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Wallace Stevens Short Poems

Famous Short Wallace Stevens Poems. Short poetry by famous poet Wallace Stevens. A collection of the all-time best Wallace Stevens short poems


by Wallace Stevens
The houses are haunted
By white night-gowns.
None are green, Or purple with green rings, Or green with yellow rings, Or yellow with blue rings.
None of them are strange, With socks of lace And beaded ceintures.
People are not going To dream of baboons and periwinkles.
Only, here and there, an old sailor, Drunk and asleep in his boots, Catches tigers In red weather.



by Wallace Stevens
As the immense dew of Florida
Brings forth
The big-finned palm
And green vine angering for life,

As the immense dew of Florida
Brings forth hymn and hymn
From the beholder,
Beholding all these green sides
And gold sides of green sides,

And blessed mornings,
Meet for the eye of the young alligator,
And lightning colors
So, in me, comes flinging
Forms, flames, and the flakes of flames.

by Wallace Stevens
I placed a jar in Tennessee, 
And round it was, upon a hill.
It made the slovenly wilderness Surround that hill.
The wilderness rose up to it, And sprawled around, no longer wild.
The jar was round upon the ground And tall and of a port in air.
It took dominion every where.
The jar was gray and bare.
It did not give of bird or bush, Like nothing else in Tennessee.

by Wallace Stevens
Hi! The creator too is blind,
Struggling toward his harmonious whole,
Rejecting intermediate parts,
Horrors and falsities and wrongs;
Incapable master of all force,
Too vague idealist, overwhelmed
By an afflatus that persists.
For this, then, we endure brief lives, The evanescent symmetries From that meticulous potter's thumb.

by Wallace Stevens
Although you sit in a room that is gray, 
Except for the silver 
Of the straw-paper, 
And pick 
At your pale white gown; 
Or lift one of the green beads 
Of your necklace, 
To let it fall; 
Or gaze at your green fan 
Printed with the red branches of a red willow; 
Or, with one finger, 
Move the leaf in the bowl-- 
The leaf that has fallen from the branches of the forsythia 
Beside you.
.
.
What is all this? I know how furiously your heart is beating.

by Wallace Stevens
 Although you sit in a room that is gray,
Except for the silver
Of the straw-paper,
And pick
At your pale white gown;
Or lift one of the green beads
Of your necklace,
To let it fall;
Or gaze at your green fan
Printed with the red branches of a red willow;
Or, with one finger,
Move the leaf in the bowl--
The leaf that has fallen from the branches of the forsythia
Beside you.
.
.
What is all this? I know how furiously your heart is beating.

by Wallace Stevens
Chieftain Iffucan of Azcan in caftan
Of tan with henna hackles, halt!

Damned universal cock, as if the sun
Was blackamoor to bear your blazing tail.
Fat! Fat! Fat! Fat! I am the personal.
Your world is you.
I am my world.
You ten-foot poet among inchlings.
Fat! Begone! An inchling bristles in these pines, Bristles, and points their Appalachian tangs, And fears not portly Azcan nor his hoos.



by Wallace Stevens
 The houses are haunted
By white night-gowns.
None are green, Or purple with green rings, Or green with yellow rings, Or yellow with blue rings.
None of them are strange, With socks of lace And beaded ceintures.
People are not going To dream of baboons and periwinkles.
Only, here and there, an old sailor, Drunk and asleep in his boots, Catches Tigers In red weather.

Tattoo  Create an image from this poem
by Wallace Stevens
 The light is like a spider.
It crawls over the water.
It crawls over the edges of the snow.
It crawls under your eyelids And spreads its webs there-- Its two webs.
The webs of your eyes Are fastened To the flesh and bones of you As to rafters or grass.
There are filaments of your eyes On the surface of the water And in the edges of the snow.

by Wallace Stevens
 My candle burned alone in an immense valley.
Beams of the huge night converged upon it, Until the wind blew.
The beams of the huge night Converged upon its image, Until the wind blew.

by Dejan Stojanovic
The sea was the house and the world was the nave 
You were the sea and you were the nave 

The nave was stormy, the sea was calm 
While the house was waiting for the world 

To come in by the navy of the sea 
The sea was a nave, the world was a house 

You were the nave in the sea— 
The house and the world 

The world was the navy in the sea 
And the sea was the house 


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