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Rudyard Kipling Short Poems

Famous Short Rudyard Kipling Poems. Short poetry by famous poet Rudyard Kipling. A collection of the all-time best Rudyard Kipling short poems


by Rudyard Kipling
 You must n't swim till you're six weeks old,
 Or your head will be sunk by your heels;
 And summer gales and Killer Whales
 Are bad for baby seals.
Are bad for baby seals, dear rat, As bad as bad can be; But splash and grow strong, And you can't be wrong, Child of the Open Sea!



by Rudyard Kipling
 Oh! hush thee, my baby, the night is behind us
And black are the waters that sparkled so green.
The moon, O'er the combers, looks downward to find us At rest in the hollows that rustle between.
Where billow meets billow, there soft by the pillow.
Oh, weary wee flipperling, curl at thy ease! The storm shall not wake thee, no shark shall overtake thee Asleep in the storm of slow-swinging seas.

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by Rudyard Kipling
 Unto whose use the pregnant suns are poised,
With idiot moons and stars retracting stars?
Creep thou between -- thy coming's all unnoised.
Heaven hath her high, as Earth her baser, wars.
Heir to these tumults, this affright, that fray (By Adam's, fathers', own, sin bound alway); Peer up, draw out thy horoscope and say Which planet mends thy threadbare fate, or mars.

by Rudyard Kipling
 If I were hanged on the highest hill,
Mother o' mine, O mother o' mine!
I know whose love would follow me still,
Mother o' mine, O mother o' mine!

If I were drowned in the deepest sea,
Mother o' mine, O mother o' mine!
I know whose tears would come down to me,
Mother o' mine, O mother o' mine!

If I were damned of body and soul,
I know whose prayers would make me whole,
Mother o' mine, O mother o' mine!

by Rudyard Kipling
 "THE WOMAN IN HIS LIFE"
I have done mostly what most men do,
And pushed it out of my mind;
But I can't forget, if I wanted to,
Four-Feet trotting behind.
Day after day, the whole day through -- Wherever my road inclined -- Four-feet said, "I am coming with you!" And trotted along behind.
Now I must go by some other round, -- Which I shall never find -- Somewhere that does not carry the sound Of Four-Feet trotting behind.

by Rudyard Kipling
 The ships destroy us above
 And ensnare us beneath.
We arise, we lie down, and we In the belly of Death.
The ships have a thousand eyes To mark where we come .
.
.
But the mirth of a seaport dies When our blow gets home.

by Rudyard Kipling
 To-day, across our fathers' graves,
 The astonished years reveal
The remnant of that desperate host
 Which cleansed our East with steel.
Hail and farewell! We greet you here, With tears that none will scorn-- O Keepers of the House of old, Or ever we were born! One service more we dare to ask-- Pray for us, heroes, pray, That when Fate lays on us our task We do not shame the Day!

by Rudyard Kipling
 When 'Omer smote 'is bloomin' lyre,
 He'd 'eard men sing by land an' sea;
An' what he thought 'e might require,
 'E went an' took -- the same as me!

The market-girls an' fishermen,
 The shepherds an' the sailors, too,
They 'eard old songs turn up again,
 But kep' it quiet -- same as you!

They knew 'e stole; 'e knew they knowed.
They didn't tell, nor make a fuss, But winked at 'Omer down the road, An' 'e winked back -- the same as us!

by Rudyard Kipling
 I have eaten your bread and salt.
I have drunk your water and wine.
In deaths ye died I have watched beside, And the lives ye led were mine.
Was there aught that I did not share In vigil or toil or ease, -- One joy or woe that I did not know, Dear hearts across the seas? I have written the tale of our life For a sheltered people's mirth, In jesting guise -- but ye are wise, And ye know what the jest is worth.

by Rudyard Kipling
 I have made for you a song
 And it may be right or wrong,
But only you can tell me if it's true.
I have tried for to explain Both your pleasure and your pain, And, Thomas, here's my best respects to you! O there'll surely come a day When they'll give you all your pay, And treat you as a Christian ought to do; So, until that day comes round, Heaven keep you safe and sound, And, Thomas, here's my best respects to you!

by Rudyard Kipling
 'Less you want your toes trod of you'd better get back at once,
For the bullocks are walking two by two,
The byles are walking two by two, 
And the elephants bring the guns.
Ho! Yuss! Great-big-long-black-forty-pounder guns.
Jiggery-jolty to and fro, Each as big as a launch in tow -- Blind-dumb-broad-breeched--beggars o' battering-guns! My Lord the Elephant.

by Rudyard Kipling
 1923

Man dies too soon, beside his works half-planned.
His days are counted and reprieve is vain: Who shall entreat with Death to stay his hand; Or cloke the shameful nakedness of pain? Send here the bold, the seekers of the way-- The passionless, the unshakeable of soul, Who serve the inmost mysteries of man's clay, And ask no more than leave to make them whole.

by Rudyard Kipling
 I have made for you a song,
 And it may be right or wrong,
But only you can tell me if it's true;
 I have tried for to explain
 Both your pleasure and your pain,
And, Thomas, here's my best respects to you!

 O there'll surely come a day
 When they'll give you all your pay,
And treat you as a Christian ought to do;
 So, until that day comes round,
 Heaven keep you safe and sound,
And, Thomas, here's my best respects to you!