Short Poetry by Popular Famous Poets

 Poet
1 William Wordsworth
2 Oscar Wilde
3 William Shakespeare
4 Emily Dickinson
5 Maya Angelou
6 Rabindranath Tagore
7 Robert Frost
8 Langston Hughes
9 Walt Whitman
10 Shel Silverstein
11 William Blake
12 Sylvia Plath
13 Pablo Neruda
14 William Butler Yeats
15 Alfred Lord Tennyson
16 Rudyard Kipling
17 Tupac Shakur
18 Edward Estlin (E E) Cummings
19 Charles Bukowski
20 Sandra Cisneros
21 Muhammad Ali
22 Alice Walker
23 Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
24 Billy Collins
25 Sarojini Naidu
26 Christina Rossetti
27 Carol Ann Duffy
28 Edgar Allan Poe
29 John Donne
30 Ralph Waldo Emerson
31 Nikki Giovanni
32 John Keats
33 Raymond Carver
34 Ogden Nash
35 Lewis Carroll
36 Thomas Hardy
37 Mark Twain
38 Spike Milligan
39 Anne Sexton
40 Carl Sandburg
41 Alexander Pushkin
42 Elizabeth Barrett Browning
43 Percy Bysshe Shelley
44 Henry David Thoreau
45 Victor Hugo
46 Roger McGough
47 Sara Teasdale
48 George (Lord) Byron
49 Gary Soto
50 Gwendolyn Brooks

Poetry Forum Areas

Introduce Yourself

New to PoetrySoup? Introduce yourself here. Tell us something about yourself.

Looking for a Poem

Can't find a poem you've read before? Looking for a poem for a special person or an occasion? Ask other member for help.

Writing Poetry

Ways to improve your poetry. Post your techniques, tips, and creative ideas how to write better.

High Critique

For poets who want unrestricted constructive criticism. This is NOT a vanity workshop. If you do not want your poem seriously critiqued, do not post here. Constructive criticism only. PLEASE Only Post One Poem a Day!!!

How do I...?

Ask PoetrySoup Members how to do something or find something on PoetrySoup.



You have an ad blocker! We understand, but...

PoetrySoup is a small privately owned website. Our means of support comes from advertising revenue. We want to keep PoetrySoup alive, make it better, and keep it free. Please support us by disabling your ad blocker on PoetrySoup. See how to enable ads while keeping your ad blocker active. Thank you!

Famous Short Longing Poems

Famous Short Longing Poems. Short Longing Poetry by Famous Poets. A collection of the all-time best Longing short poems

Other Short Poem Pages


Poems are below...


Longing | Short Famous Poems and Poets

 
by Sara Teasdale

Longing

 I am not sorry for my soul
That it must go unsatisfied,
For it can live a thousand times,
Eternity is deep and wide.
I am not sorry for my soul, But oh, my body that must go Back to a little drift of dust Without the joy it longed to know.


by Emily Dickinson

The look of thee what is it like

 The look of thee, what is it like
Hast thou a hand or Foot
Or Mansion of Identity
And what is thy Pursuit?

Thy fellows are they realms or Themes
Hast thou Delight or Fear
Or Longing -- and is that for us
Or values more severe?

Let change transfuse all other Traits
Enact all other Blame
But deign this least certificate --
That thou shalt be the same.


by Hermann Hesse

Lonesome Night

 You brothers, who are mine,
Poor people, near and far,
Longing for every star,
Dream of relief from pain,
You, stumbling dumb
At night, as pale stars break,
Lift your thin hands for some
Hope, and suffer, and wake,
Poor muddling commonplace,
You sailors who must live
Unstarred by hopelessness,
We share a single face.
Give me my welcome back.


by Charles Simic

The Partial Explanation

 Seems like a long time
Since the waiter took my order.
Grimy little luncheonette, The snow falling outside.
Seems like it has grown darker Since I last heard the kitchen door Behind my back Since I last noticed Anyone pass on the street.
A glass of ice-water Keeps me company At this table I chose myself Upon entering.
And a longing, Incredible longing To eavesdrop On the conversation Of cooks.


by Paul Laurence Dunbar

Theology

 There is a heaven, for ever, day by day, 
The upward longing of my soul doth tell me so.
There is a hell, I'm quite as sure; for pray If there were not, where would my neighbours go?


by John Greenleaf Whittier

By Their Works

 Call him not heretic whose works attest
His faith in goodness by no creed confessed.
Whatever in love's name is truly done To free the bound and lift the fallen one Is done to Christ.
Whoso in deed and word Is not against Him labours for our Lord.
When he, who, sad and weary, longing sore For love's sweet service sought the sisters' door One saw the heavenly, one the human guest But who shall say which loved the master best?


by Emily Dickinson

Go tell it -- What a Message --

 "Go tell it" -- What a Message --
To whom -- is specified --
Not murmur -- not endearment --
But simply -- we -- obeyed --
Obeyed -- a Lure -- a Longing?
Oh Nature -- none of this --
To Law -- said sweet Thermopylae
I give my dying Kiss --


by Claude McKay

The Tropics in New York

 Bananas ripe and green, and ginger-root,
Cocoa in pods and alligator pears,
And tangerines and mangoes and grape fruit,
Fit for the highest prize at parish fairs,

Set in the window, bringing memories
Of fruit-trees laden by low-singing rills,
And dewy dawns, and mystical blue skies
In benediction over nun-like hills.
My eyes grew dim, and I could no more gaze; A wave of longing through my body swept, And, hungry for the old, familiar ways, I turned aside and bowed my head and wept.


by Paul Laurence Dunbar

LOVE'S HUMILITY

As some rapt gazer on the lowly earth,
Looks up to radiant planets, ranging far,
So I, whose soul doth know thy wondrous worth
Look longing up to thee as to a star.


by Louisa May Alcott

Lily-Bell and Thistledown Song II

 Thistledown in prison sings:

Bright shines the summer sun,
Soft is the summer air;
Gayly the wood-birds sing,
Flowers are blooming fair.
But, deep in the dark, cold rock, Sadly I dwell, Longing for thee, dear friend, Lily-Bell! Lily-Bell! Lily-Bell replies: Through sunlight and summer air I have sought for thee long, Guided by birds and flowers, And now by thy song.
Thistledown! Thistledown! O'er hill and dell Hither to comfort thee Comes Lily-Bell.


by Rabindranath Tagore

Lovers Gifts XXXIX: There Is a Looker-On

 There is a looker-on who sits behind my eyes.
I seems he has seen things in ages and worlds beyond memory's shore, and those forgotten sights glisten on the grass and shiver on the leaves.
He has seen under new veils the face of the one beloved, in twilight hours of many a nameless star.
Therefore his sky seems to ache with the pain of countless meetings and partings, and a longing pervades this spring breeze, -the longing that is full of the whisper of ages without beginning.


by The Bible

Proverbs 2:1-7

If you will receive God's words
And treasure all His commands
Being attentive to godly wisdom,
He'll be your shield from harm
If you raise your voice for understanding
And cry out for godly insight
Longing for godly direction,
Each and every day of your life,
And if you seek for God's wisdom
As for treasure that is hidden
Then you will know the fear of the Lord
And have His knowledge within.

Scripture Poem © Copyright Of M.
S.
Lowndes


by William Butler Yeats

Loves Loneliness

 Old fathers, great-grandfathers,
Rise as kindred should.
If ever lover's loneliness Came where you stood, Pray that Heaven protect us That protect your blood.
The mountain throws a shadow, Thin is the moon's horn; What did we remember Under the ragged thorn? Dread has followed longing, And our hearts are torn.


by William Butler Yeats

The Wheel

 Through winter-time we call on spring,
And through the spring on summer call,
And when abounding hedges ring
Declare that winter's best of all;
And after that there s nothing good
Because the spring-time has not come -
Nor know that what disturbs our blood
Is but its longing for the tomb.


by Emily Dickinson

Longing is like the Seed

 Longing is like the Seed
That wrestles in the Ground,
Believing if it intercede
It shall at length be found.
The Hour, and the Clime -- Each Circumstance unknown, What Constancy must be achieved Before it see the Sun!


by Ezra Pound

Taking Leave of a Friend

 Blue mountains lie beyond the north wall;
Round the city's eastern side flows the white water.
Here we part, friend, once forever.
You go ten thousand miles, drifting away Like an unrooted water-grass.
Oh, the floating clouds and the thoughts of a wanderer! Oh, the sunset and the longing of an old friend! We ride away from each other, waving our hands, While our horses neigh softly, softly .
.
.
.


by Emily Dickinson

Delights Despair at setting

 Delight's Despair at setting
Is that Delight is less
Than the sufficing Longing
That so impoverish.
Enchantment's Perihelion Mistaken oft has been For the Authentic orbit Of its Anterior Sun.


by Emily Dickinson

Not any more to be lacked --

 Not any more to be lacked --
Not any more to be known --
Denizen of Significance
For a span so worn --

Even Nature herself
Has forgot it is there --
Sedulous of her Multitudes
Notwithstanding Despair --

Of the Ones that pursued it
Suing it not to go
Some have solaced the longing
To accompany --

Some -- rescinded the Wrench --
Others -- Shall I say
Plated the residue of Adz
With Monotony.


by A E Housman

When the Lad for Longing Sighs

 When the lad for longing sighs, 
Mute and dull of cheer and pale, 
If at death's own door he lies, 
Maiden, you can heal his ail.
Lovers' ills are all to buy: The wan look, the hollow tone, The hung head, the sunken eye, You can have them for your own.
Buy them, buy them: eve and morn Lovers' ills are all to sell.
Then you can lie down forlorn; But the lover will be well.


by Ahmet Yalcinkaya

Longing For You Suffices I Cannot Say Come

I cannot say come to you 
I cannot call you while I am like you
I do not call you from climates far away
before fears
if you would find me 
in gardens without nightingales
I run away
/ may be you catch me without roses
maybe you wound me /
I stand out to sea at that, it is the way
I do not look at the deep
/ may be my ship rushes to you
I come to you to climates far away /

Ahmet Yalcinkaya
© Translated by Richard Mildstone


by Rg Gregory

it was once called

 it comes like a convict
squeezing through bars
and is gone before
the promptest siren

it suddenly turns
in the ear or rides
the eye of a thought
before dissolving

i have it in a faint
taste or shudder
an ache like a spring
high in the mountains

it was once called love
and now a longing
for a song to be heard
that doesn't bear singing


by Emily Dickinson

The joy that has no stem no core

 The joy that has no stem no core,
Nor seed that we can sow,
Is edible to longing.
But ablative to show.
By fundamental palates Those products are preferred Impregnable to transit And patented by pod.


by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

THE BUYERS

 To an apple-woman's stall

Once some children nimbly ran;
Longing much to purchase all,
They with joyous haste began
Snatching up the piles there raised,
While with eager eyes they gazed
On the rosy fruit so nice;
But when they found out the price,
Down they threw the whole they'd got,
Just as if they were red hot.
* * * * * The man who gratis will his goods supply Will never find a lack of folks to buy! 1820.


by Paul Laurence Dunbar

THEOLOGY

There is a heaven, for ever, day by day,
The upward longing of my soul doth tell me so.
There is a hell, I 'm quite as sure; for pray,
If there were not, where would my neighbours go?


by Emily Dickinson

Through those old Grounds of memory

 Through those old Grounds of memory,
The sauntering alone
Is a divine intemperance
A prudent man would shun.
Of liquors that are vended 'Tis easy to beware But statutes do not meddle With the internal bar.
Pernicious as the sunset Permitting to pursue But impotent to gather, The tranquil perfidy Alloys our firmer moments With that severest gold Convenient to the longing But otherwise withheld.