Best Famous Fairing Poems

Here is a collection of the all-time best famous Fairing poems. This is a select list of the best famous Fairing poetry. Reading, writing, and enjoying famous Fairing poetry (as well as classical and contemporary poems) is a great past time. These top poems are the best examples of fairing poems.

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Poems are below...



Written by Robert William Service | Create an image from this poem

Maids In May

 Three maids there were in meadow bright,
The eldest less then seven;
Their eyes were dancing with delight,
And innocent as Heaven.
Wild flowers they wound with tender glee, Their cheeks with rapture rosy; All radiant they smiled at me, When I besought a posy.
She gave me a columbine, And one a poppy brought me; The tiniest, with eyes ashine, A simple daisy sought me.
And as I went my sober way, I heard their careless laughter; Their hearts too happy with to-day To care for what comes after.
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That's long ago; they're gone, all three, To walk amid the shadows; Forgotten is their lyric glee In still and sunny meadows.
For Columbine loved life too well, And went adventure fairing; And sank into the pit of hell, And passed but little caring.
While Poppy was a poor man's wife, And children had a-plenty; And went, worn out with toil and strife When she was five-and-twenty.
And Daisy died while yet a child, As fragile blossoms perish, When Winter winds are harsh and wild, With none to shield and cherish.
Ah me! How fate is dark and dour To little Children of the Poor.
Written by William Shakespeare | Create an image from this poem

Sonnet CXXVII

  In the old age black was not counted fair,
Or if it were, it bore not beauty's name;
But now is black beauty's successive heir,
And beauty slander'd with a bastard shame:
For since each hand hath put on nature's power,
Fairing the foul with art's false borrow'd face,
Sweet beauty hath no name, no holy bower,
But is profaned, if not lives in disgrace.
Therefore my mistress' brows are raven black, Her eyes so suited, and they mourners seem At such who, not born fair, no beauty lack, Slandering creation with a false esteem: Yet so they mourn, becoming of their woe, That every tongue says beauty should look so.
Written by William Shakespeare | Create an image from this poem

Sonnet 127: In the old age black was not counted fair

 In the old age black was not counted fair,
Or if it were, it bore not beauty's name;
But now is black beauty's successive heir,
And beauty slandered with a bastard shame.
For since each hand hath put on nature's power, Fairing the foul with art's false borrowed face, Sweet beauty hath no name no holy bower, But is profaned, if not lives in disgrace.
Therefore my mistress' eyes are raven black, Her eyes so suited, and they mourners seem, At such who, not born fair no beauty lack, Sland'ring creation with a false esteem.
Yet so they mourn, becoming of their woe, That every tongue says beauty should look so.