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Perfect Rhyme Explained

Written by: Suzette Richards

Perfect rhyme can be classified according to the number of syllables included in the rhyme, which is dictated by the location of the final stressed syllable.

· Single: A rhyme in which the stress is on the final syllable of the words (rhyme/sublime).

· Double: A rhyme in which the stress is on the penultimate (second from last) syllable of the words (picky/tricky).

· Dactylic: A rhyme in which the stress is on the ante-penultimate (third from last) syllable (cacophonies/Aristophanes).

 

Although all three syllables match in the final words in lines 1, 2 & 3 of the following Limerick, For no Rhyme or Reason, double perfect rhyme was used in these lines as the STRESSED SYLLABLE (‘e’) is the penultimate syllable in these three words respectively: Protector/prospector/projector.

Lines 3 & 4: diamonds/bonds: This is NOT an example of a perfect rhyme as the stressed syllables fall differently in these two words: ‘i’ and ‘o’ respectively.

 

 

 FOR NO RHYME OR REASON

 

There was a green Public Protector

who fancied herself as prospector.

‘Digging for diamonds’

and Reserve Bank bonds—

this country’s junk status projector!