The minstrel and the rubbish

Written by: Vassilis Comporozos

The minstrel and the rubbish
	To a homeless in N.Y., who had a guitar to keep him company
                   
                                      But he that is greatest among you shall be your servant. 
                                                                                                   (Matthew, 23, 11)
The rubbish was blown aside
by the arid marching of the wind
leaving the whole street clear
for the minstrel who was crooning
his latest composition
to the street’s dream-recipients,

while the voltage of the wind
was going down at intervals
under the burden 
of the unexpected stave.

The night was watchful 
- you’d say she dreaded –
lest she bumped into the chords
and crush their solitary waving.
Breastfeeding music the minstrel
was opening up new pathways
to the question marks
of his melodies.

Me, what was I then
I still haven’t found.
Wind, rubbish, onlooker
or something else?

The minstrel ’s mute audience,
the rubbish, transcended its nature
at Time’s attendance register

and, after all, it would not
have always been rubbish
and some of it would have had
its own illustrious past, too,
and it must have known
what it means to have
eyes that leave Love
as a map to find them back
and warmth that has left,
as a memorial,
its fleeting past,
with Hope
as its one and only stamp.

All alone the minstrel,
homeless with his homeless guitar
housed his trivial dreams,
under the yoke 
of the obese city’s wind,

in his Heavenly Melodies. 
(translated by the original ‘O ???a??d?? ?a? ta s???p?da’, by the poet,  from his book of the same title.)