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Marble Halls

Jones R Ayuwo Avatar  Send Soup Mail  Block poet from commenting on your poetry

Below is the poem entitled Marble Halls which was written by poet Jones R Ayuwo. Please feel free to comment on this poem. However, please remember, PoetrySoup is a place of encouragement and growth.

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Marble Halls

I dreamed I dwelt in marble halls,
With servants and helps and slaves and all.
Silver cutlery, mahogany furniture and cedar floors,
I dreamed that man and beast both great and small
Knelt before me, swearing allegiance while a kissin’
My fingers so. That I would wake to the sound 
Of harps and flutes and lyres too. That work 
And pain were as alien to me as a red sun.
I dreamed that Ulysses’ flower grew on red
Tapestries hanging from the crystal roof.
That ariels and sprites and mermaids and hobbits
Attended to me and served me meals as a habit.
I drank from crystal ponds and swam in
Waters with all kinds of fish. Oh what pretty fins!

 But then I saw him! Standing guard at
The gate. Paying me no mind like I were a dusty old hat!
What insolence. Why doesn’t he look at me?
Who does he think he is? Thinks he that he
And his lowly assignments mean more to the land 
Than the princess of the marble halls and her hand
Littered with jewels from the treasures of Blackbeard himself?!
I could have him killed for no reason!
Could send him to Davy Jones’ locker any season!
Oh but I won’t. Oh but I can’t. My heart beats
At the sight of him; what shoulders ever graced man
Since Hercules, or chests like drums to beat!
A face like one of the statues of Perseus himself.
Oh that face, it graces my eyes daily and yet 
I am powerless to do a thing. Oh Gibbet,
Even in my dreams you torment me still.  

A tap and a shove, I think I dream still,
But here stands Gibbet in suit and tie;
At last it’s the aisle our nuptial knots to tie.
He stretches his awesome arms, and opens his lovely mouth
And says;
“I pay you not to sit and stare
Now pick your broom and this filth clear!”
I scramble and dash for my broom and cloth
Oh I did it again; sleeping on duty!      

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