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Haggis and Drinks Mi Luve (Mythology)

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Below is the poem entitled Haggis and Drinks Mi Luve (Mythology) which was written by poet Joseph Spence Sr. Please feel free to comment on this poem. However, please remember, PoetrySoup is a place of encouragement and growth.

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Haggis and Drinks Mi Luve (Mythology)

Let’s hve haggis and drinks mi luve
Find de bes ina de ole land 
Lay yu head on mi chest mi luve
Whilst wi dance musik wid de band

Dance wid de band in de Highlands
Backyard jig good fer de ole soul
Tickle mi nose with yu gold locks
Tigether wi bade ead to toe’s sole

Call Fionn mi Luve with his jug
Nice poems he read at de gate
Summon the Clooties with a mug
Aye, they will cum and bles dis date

We’ll sail de river on Loch Ness
Kelpies will protect our flanks
Goddess Scotia says we bless
Oh mi chamin' sweet Sidhe, tanks

Aye! Mi sweet luve; Boobrie will fly
He will fetch up the Salmon Ring
And a knot cross de land we tye
Red Caps our guard til cum de spring

Then wid haggis and drinks mi luve
Goddesses'pipes blow dem great songs
In the grey mist we skip and dance
Then like Boobrie we fly with doves

Scottish Mythical Legends:

1. Fionn is a Scottish magician, warrior and poet
2. Clootie is a Scottish name for the devil.  The name originated from the word cloot, which  
    mean a division in the cleft hoof of an animal.
3. Kelpie is a Scottish water devil who lurks in lakes and rivers and drowns its victims.
4. Scotia is a goddess normally portrayed as an old hag with the tusks of a wild boar
5. Sidhe (Shee) is the Gaelic name for fairies in the Highlands of Scotland and also Ireland. 
6. Boodrie is a wonderful water-bird from the Highlands.  It haunts and protects the lakes  
    and wells.
7. Red Cap is a sort of short, stocky old guy with long gray hair and claws instead of hands 
    and fingers. He lives on the Scottish border and guard the ancient ruins of castles




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  1. Date: 7/18/2010 6:54:00 AM
    Awesome Scottish ballad, Joseph! Great write and well penned! Thank you for your recent comments and if you'd like have a look at my facebook albums. Have a nice week...Gert

  1. Date: 7/15/2010 12:57:00 PM
    Congratulations on your winning poem in Tirzah's Contest, Joe! Thanks also for this very interesting story and lesson about Scottish Mythical Legends! Peace, lvoe,Audrey

  1. Date: 7/11/2010 11:20:00 PM
    a very interesting myth. clootie is a cool name as well, strange sounding for the devil too. keep the mythology in your wirtes.(: ~Always&Forever Lynette

  1. Date: 7/8/2010 4:16:00 PM
    So cool Joseph.. so enjoyable to read and learn from your footnotes.. great job with the word play and phonetics .. luv it.. thankxxx for your always sweet and tender comments on my poetry reads.. leaving the island tomorrow for the 17 hour flight home.. miss my family and pets.. oh my babies.. see ya soon.. with luv.. .

  1. Date: 7/6/2010 8:49:00 PM
    Hey great way to tell the tale, complete with the dialect and a glossay of the interesting names!Very creative. Congratulations, Joseph!

  1. Date: 7/6/2010 4:56:00 AM
    Congratulations Joseph on your win in Tirzah Conway's contest "Fantasy". Love, Carol

  1. Date: 7/5/2010 3:48:00 PM
    This was a very interesting piece, I learned quite a bit about Scottish and Irish mythology that I had never heard before~ Congrat's on your HM in my contest!~Tirzah~

  1. Date: 7/4/2010 10:39:00 AM
    Loved this piece here.. I'm new so have mercy and I hope you have an open mind my styles pretty different. Enjoy ya day

  1. Date: 7/4/2010 8:39:00 AM
    holy bat words here joe this is awesome hope you put this in your next book also hope you are having mango on this 4th hey brother go to reverbnation and check out my new song its called what I love About You it rocks for the Lord even on clarksville charts at 160 so ya maybe now some greenbacks will flow this way to upper midwest hugs

  1. Date: 7/3/2010 6:35:00 PM
    this was just so awesome to read aloud, John! I so enjoyed this---and I think I hear bagpipes in the distance too ;) --wish you all the best with this very unique write! --nikko :)

  1. Date: 7/3/2010 6:00:00 AM
    I love this poem,Its magical and beautiful!Scotland is really the place of faries,castles,musik and glens,Ow how I love it and your verses,Outsanding!C

  1. Date: 7/3/2010 4:15:00 AM
    Hell of a yarn Mr. Spence ! And great Info ! It makes the art so much more enjoyable to read ....Again.....james

  1. Date: 7/3/2010 12:26:00 AM
    Love the yard chat. Takes me back home.

  1. Date: 7/3/2010 12:06:00 AM
    Amazing and very brilliant i have never read such an interesting ballad on things, and mysterious know things to the world. thanks for such a wonderful poem,..p.d.

  1. Date: 7/2/2010 5:18:00 PM
    ... Joe, I love legend a lot ... indeed, I'm into oral literary scholarship ... to do more on my Scottish weird sphere could be tempting now that a friend is there for me ... let's look forward ... I feel like a captive unto your verse! keep fit! Canny

  1. Date: 7/2/2010 5:02:00 PM
    Very informative and learned a lot of Scottish legends

  1. Date: 7/2/2010 5:00:00 PM
    You have brought me to you with this gem of a write Jospeh. You have certainly done your homework. It's been an absolute joy to read >> James

  1. Date: 7/2/2010 4:34:00 PM
    Outstanding, Joseph! I learned a lot about Scottish mythology from your footnotes at the end, but even without them, the poem reads so well. Truly a joy! I'll send a message to James Fraser (the Highlander) and be sure he sees this. You capture the dialect perfectly. Love, Carolyn

  1. Date: 7/2/2010 4:23:00 PM
    Captiviting tale..Great rhythm...Thanks for the info of the old Scottish yarns..Sara

  1. Date: 7/2/2010 4:18:00 PM
    very informative poem, I enjoyed the dialect of the scottish.