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Food Narrative Poems | Narrative Poems About Food

These Food Narrative poems are examples of Narrative poems about Food. These are the best examples of Food Narrative poems written by international PoetrySoup poets

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Details | Narrative |

The Dog and the Rabbit

The dog seen a rabbit and how he did chase
to catch that little critter and boy what a race

But one thing that rabbit knew as he ran away
he was not going to be lunch for that dog today

Around the tree and  into the bushes he went
the dog was right after that little rabbit's scent

the dog was so busy that he never did see
that big old  hornet nest  way up in the tree

running and barking and making a sound
made all the hornets start buzzing around

They all made a dive and together they flew
when they  hit the dog he knew he was through

He made up his mind right there and then
he would never go chasing that rabbit again


Details | Narrative |

EGGS, EXPIRED

Morning light fills in the details
hidden by last night's new moon.
His pillow bears no dent, seems colder 
than the draft that she needs to find
and fix, soon, before winter sets in.

It means going into the workshop,
poking through sticky, old drawers,
a territory that was never truly hers.
She must find the caulking gun and try
not to stare at that festooned hat,
the once well-cared for fishing gear 
robed in cobwebs, a calendar unturned,
bowling trophies, an empty chair,
one model schooner never finished.

She pours a mug of coffee, though she 
prefers tea, slowly steeped in a proper
pot, loose leaf oolong, nicely cozied.
His mug is too large, too practical, too grey,
and her small hand is more familiar with 
English bone china, roses and ribbons,
the romantic pattern of their days.

There is a slight dip in the kitchen floor
as though he is still standing by the stove,
as though the tiles hold onto him, too.
Thirty years of omelets, his way-
polish sausage, spanish onion,
over cooked, over salted. 

She expects to hear
the whisk, his voice, laughter.

Weekends they'd shop at the market,
Farm fresh eggs, he'd said, were best,
worth the trip and he'd indulge her
love of something sweet or 
surprise her with marmalade,
clover honey in tiny jars.

She opens the fridge door, takes out the
cream and settles for toast with jam,
thinks about canceling his subscription
to Sports Illustrated, Rod and Reel,
but decides to wait until tomorrow.

She sees the egg carton, reads:
brown. free run. flax fed.
Some chickens just have it good,
he'd said. Oh, he'd said that often.

She stills and her shell breaks
as she notes the best before date...

Two months have passed since
her world expired.


Details | Narrative |

THANKSGIVING TURKEY

They organized a church bazaar,
To raise money for the poor.
A booth for selling chances
Was set up, outside the door.

When I bought the raffle ticket, 
My reasoning was murky,
And I could only just believe it,
When I won that doggone turkey.

Now, the kids were all excited
When we brought the critter home.
So we placed him in the barnyard, 
Where he'd have lots of room to roam.

Since the date was late October,
I'm quite sure you understand,
That to have him for Thanksgiving
Was my awe inspiring plan.

Well, the turkey was no birdbrain,
As I was very soon to find.
That bird knew what I was thinking;
Why, I declare, he read my mind. 

I let the children care for him,
To my most profound regret--
He turned on his charming manner,
And, quickly, he became their pet.

But that fact did not deter me,
I told myself it didn't matter.
I was dead set and determined
To see that gobbler on a platter.

When the kids perceived my purpose,
They turned on the tears and pleas.
Then, the wife joined in their chorus,
And that brought me to my knees.

So I told my grieving family
They could dry up, and relax.
I concealed my disappointment--
Went and put away the axe.

Came the dinner of Thanksgiving,
Not a sad face could be found.
And our live Thanksgiving turkey
Was the gladdest bird around. 

We gathered around the table,
And I humbly asked the blessing--
While Tom gobbled down his corn, outside,
We had hotdogs and dressing. 


Details | Narrative |

Tradition

Within these walls…
Fragrant aura of comfort
Freshly washed baby hair and sweet breath;
Passed around in soft pink pajamas
Laughter and wit from older minds;
Even though the stories are well used
Awkward ramblings of youngsters;
Still testing their wings
Warm delicious wafts of seasoned meat
And sugared pies
From a kitchen full of women;
Sharing recipes and secrets while sipping Chardonnay
Rambunctious giggles from upstairs;
Playing children’s games in pretty clothes
While piles of coats, hats, and purses
Sleep soundly on the guest room bed;
Along with one gray tabby cat
Crisp fallen leaves dance with shimmering snowflakes,
The first of the season
In a chilly November breeze
Just outside the door;
Painted a vibrant red
Illuminated by glowing amber post lamps;
Stalwart sentinels for our
Tradition… 
Within these wonderful walls


Details | Narrative |

It Takes A Whole Village to Raise a Child: The Farmer

It Takes A Whole Village to Raise a Child: The Farmer

It has been said that it takes a whole village
To raise a child; How does a farmer help
Families raise the children?

Farmers live near the village; and together,
Everyone helps raise the children.
How do they help?

The farmers near the village grow food to sell.
They plant, tend, and harvest vegetable crops.
Veggies: lettuce, beets, cucumber, and tomatoes
Collard greens, cabbage, onions, and potatoes
Green beans, artichoke, peanuts, the list and work
Goes on and on and on— 
Farmers hire many workers to harvest their many crops.
Products are then, sold and sent to many vendors.
Although there are still some independent farmers,
Some farmers, like those in olden days, grow on rural farms.
Families, men, women, and children working together,
Using hoes, beasts of burden and hand plows to work the soil.
Children helping along side watching adult examples—
However, these days, big agriculture businesses own farms. 
They use huge machinery to operate their many acres.
Food producing farms: planting and harvesting to feed masses.
Their products, like smaller independent farmers’ products,
Are sent to markets in their homelands and abroad.
In the process of providing food and cotton for people,
Agriculture businesses and farmers alike set examples.
Good or bad, the children watch wide eyed
And ears perked!


Details | Narrative |

Shake, Rattle and Roll - Big Joe Turner

Third verse:
I'm like a one-eyed cat peepin' in a seafood sto'
I'm like a one-eyed cat peepin' in a seafood sto'
Well I can look at you and tell you ain' no child no mo'
***************************************************************
A few interpretations for this visually challanged and rather paranoid creature:

Still makes me hungry just don't LOOK good as it used to or
Still smells good, just ain't sure what I'm SMELLIN' no more or
Don't LOOK good as it used to, Don't SMELL good as it used to and
Definitely don't TASTE good as it used to or...

I was born that way, so what? or
Used to have two, now I only got one and
That's all you need to peep with anyways and
I think that's all you got left too so...

Let's put our eyes together on this thing and
Let's sneak over there and tom-peep that hole and
You peep on the women seafood and tell me about it and
I'll peep on the men seafood and tell you about it and...

Wait a minute here, something's not...
No, no I'm not gay! I swear I'm not!
I know by the above verse it might appear that way but
I swear to god! I swear to god I never...

Alright now, this has gone JUST ABOUT FAR ENOUGH and
You can't hardly tell them apart anyway and
The men don't even have one...they just kinda sprinkle, you know and
The rest just...How do I know? Well I-uh...read it somewhere and...

Oh, just kiss my big you-know-what! and
Wait!...I-I mean...if you're a FEMALE fish you can or a lady uh...
Oyster? Or girl crab or ..Hey, stop that!...Ow!
I didn't say...Ouch! Why you!...(Sigh) let's try this again, shall we?
*****************************************************************
Sorry folks...Just had to get this out of my system...Hope you think it's funny and
What?... WELL!! Kiss my-my uh...Elbow!...yeah, that's it! My elbow...
*****************************************************************
Bill Haley and the Comets became rich and famous for doing a 'sanitized' version of this song in 1954... Big Joe's original was considered too suggestive and sexual for white audiences...

Second verse for example:
'Way you wear those dresses, the sun come shinin' thru
Way you wear those dresses, the sun come shinin' thru
I can't believe my eyes all that mess belong to you'

(In 'proper' English: THE way you wear those dresses) 




Details | Narrative |

Canning Days Back Home

Germ-free Mason jars, hot from the pot of boiling water, gurgling on the cast iron wood stove, stood ready to receive the fruits and vegetables, fresh from the fields and orchards. Lids and sealing rings locked in the freshness. Mama, in her apron skillfully flavored the veggies as she prepared for meals months ahead. The old pressure cooker hissed as it played its part in preserving the bounty of the family farm. Preserves, jams and jellies, sealed in wax, filled the cupboard just waiting for future hot buttered biscuits. 

Peeling, dicing, chopping, pickling were all part of the process that brought kin from far away to socialize and join in preserving food for times when the land rested and awaited the start of a new season. 

Outside, Sauerkraut (layer of shredded cabbage, layer of salt,) repeated and compressed, awaiting fermentation filled the depth of a Crock on the front porch.

These glimpses of the times that are all but gone will remain with me forever. Life was tough at times but love was the balm that treated the abrasions of near poverty. And the tender touch of those who came for “Canning Days” was felt until the last jar was consumed. God’s bounty awaited, and next year’s promises stood always before us.



Written by: John Posey 10/21/13
Inspired by Canning Colors, 
A poem by Donna Jones


Details | Narrative |

WHAT?

WHAT?

Thanksgiving’s on the way
This had crossed my mind
But what?
While shopping the mall yesterday I came on this display –
Who could miss it? – 
Shelves and shelves full of teddy bears    nutcrackers
    dolls    delicate ornaments    and then!
    this big open square rimmed with the most perfect 
    synthetic trees one might imagine – silver trees    green                      
    trees    blue trees    even a red tree
    all decorated magnificently 
In the middle    exactly in the middle of the square – a stage          
    an empty throne    and this short    white slat-fence              
    enclosing the whole
I shook my head
What happened to Thanksgiving?
Who the hell is thinking about Thanksgiving?
    certainly not the merchants!
Well    I wandered down the aisle toward the food court    
    and    guess what?
I come across a pen with a real live turkey strutting around
Seems I was wrong about the merchants
So?    To top it off – in the food court    at one of the tables
   there sits a man in suspenders     white tee shirt    red   
   trousers   red coat draped across the back of the chair    a 
   phony white beard    red cap lying on the table
He is one ugly    bony faced    misshapen human being
Santa’s on lunch break    gravy and partly chewed food
   spilled down his chin    bald head red as a beet
I can’t help staring at him    totally freaked
He looks my way    smiles
“Gobble    gobble”    says St. Nick


Details | Narrative |

The Hunter--Part Two

He already knows something is wrong, but he doesn't know what or where. He studies my direction hard, but I'm just a clump of dead wood. A mosquito lands under my eye. Oh, the torture! Don't twitch, Caleb ... don't you dare twitch! Forty yards now ... not quite close enough for a sure kill ... closer now ... thirty yards. I wait for him to turn his head away from me, and raise my bow. But I can't draw, not yet. He's looking at me again. A squirrel catches his attention for a moment ... just enough ... and I slowly draw back. The wood of my longbow creaks a bit at its limit, and his eyes dart to me. No, clever old buck ... I'm just the wind in a tree. He's nervous, but I can't loose the arrow while he's looking at me. He'll dodge it for sure. My fingers ache ... white as dead flesh under the pressure I'm holding back. He looks away, and my arrow flies. The twang is enough warning for him to duck ... he's so fast! But I'm crafty too, and I knew he would duck, so I aimed low. The arrow enters behind his front shoulder, passing through his heart and out the other side. Still, he runs for nearly four hundred yards before his legs give out and he falls. His last breaths are leaving him when I reach the scene, and I mercifully put an end to it with a well placed knife blade. I go to my knees beside him and stroke his coat, in awe of the creature before me. I thank him for his death and meat. I didn't enjoy killing him, not for a moment, but I'm hungry ... and that's the way of it. His blood tastes metallic and hot as I take a bite of his freshly stopped heart, like my ancestors did. I run bloody fingers across my eye, so I might wear his mark and remember his sacrifice. And while I pack his body out to be taken home and shared, to give life back, the other animals will know who I am and what I came for. I am the hunter, neither wasteful nor cruel. I know what feeds my body, and where the life comes from. I saw the life before it was given, and took it as well. One day my own death will come, and the worms will hunt me, giving me back to the plants. Deer will pass, and I pray that I might feed them, just as they have fed me. I am the hunter.


Details | Narrative |

Summer Fun

I remember back when times were simple. You could have your milk
delivered to your door. One of my favorite memories was waiting for the
Helm’s bakery livery to drive slowly down our street, alerting us with his
musical whistle. Specially built Chevy suburban panel wagon’s, bright
and shiny yellow, contained the most heavenly scents of do-nuts and
cinnamon swirls, rolls and breads to delight the most discerning. Our driver,
we called by name, would stop, get out of his seat and come to the back to
open double doors to the smiling faces, of usually about three or four neighbor
kids besides my sister and myself. The most difficult part was trying to decide
what delicious pastry we would put on our monthly tab. Fine wooden drawers
with glass windows let colorful do-nuts peek through. We would get our usual loaf
of potato bread mom would tell us to buy, but then, quite often we were treated to
a glazed jelly do-nut or a chocolate covered cream filled éclair. Mmmmm my taste
buds tingle at the fond memories. Those succulent delights would be out of the bag
and into our mouths before we hit the front door. By the time we got inside all that
would be left would be little pieces of sticky wax paper and our gooey little hands.
As I recall those happy memories of the late ‘50’s, my only regret is that I am sorry my
children were not given the thrill of hearing “Here comes the Helmsman”, let’s beat feet!

© September 12, 2012


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