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Food Narrative Poems | Narrative Poems About Food

These Food Narrative poems are examples of Narrative poems about Food. These are the best examples of Food Narrative poems written by international PoetrySoup poets

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The Dog and the Rabbit

The dog seen a rabbit and how he did chase
to catch that little critter and boy what a race

But one thing that rabbit knew as he ran away
he was not going to be lunch for that dog today

Around the tree and  into the bushes he went
the dog was right after that little rabbit's scent

the dog was so busy that he never did see
that big old  hornet nest  way up in the tree

running and barking and making a sound
made all the hornets start buzzing around

They all made a dive and together they flew
when they  hit the dog he knew he was through

He made up his mind right there and then
he would never go chasing that rabbit again


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EGGS, EXPIRED

Morning light fills in the details
hidden by last night's new moon.
His pillow bears no dent, seems colder 
than the draft that she needs to find
and fix, soon, before winter sets in.

It means going into the workshop,
poking through sticky, old drawers,
a territory that was never truly hers.
She must find the caulking gun and try
not to stare at that festooned hat,
the once well-cared for fishing gear 
robed in cobwebs, a calendar unturned,
bowling trophies, an empty chair,
one model schooner never finished.

She pours a mug of coffee, though she 
prefers tea, slowly steeped in a proper
pot, loose leaf oolong, nicely cozied.
His mug is too large, too practical, too grey,
and her small hand is more familiar with 
English bone china, roses and ribbons,
the romantic pattern of their days.

There is a slight dip in the kitchen floor
as though he is still standing by the stove,
as though the tiles hold onto him, too.
Thirty years of omelets, his way-
polish sausage, spanish onion,
over cooked, over salted. 

She expects to hear
the whisk, his voice, laughter.

Weekends they'd shop at the market,
Farm fresh eggs, he'd said, were best,
worth the trip and he'd indulge her
love of something sweet or 
surprise her with marmalade,
clover honey in tiny jars.

She opens the fridge door, takes out the
cream and settles for toast with jam,
thinks about canceling his subscription
to Sports Illustrated, Rod and Reel,
but decides to wait until tomorrow.

She sees the egg carton, reads:
brown. free run. flax fed.
Some chickens just have it good,
he'd said. Oh, he'd said that often.

She stills and her shell breaks
as she notes the best before date...

Two months have passed since
her world expired.


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THANKSGIVING TURKEY

They organized a church bazaar,
To raise money for the poor.
A booth for selling chances
Was set up, outside the door.

When I bought the raffle ticket, 
My reasoning was murky,
And I could only just believe it,
When I won that doggone turkey.

Now, the kids were all excited
When we brought the critter home.
So we placed him in the barnyard, 
Where he'd have lots of room to roam.

Since the date was late October,
I'm quite sure you understand,
That to have him for Thanksgiving
Was my awe inspiring plan.

Well, the turkey was no birdbrain,
As I was very soon to find.
That bird knew what I was thinking;
Why, I declare, he read my mind. 

I let the children care for him,
To my most profound regret--
He turned on his charming manner,
And, quickly, he became their pet.

But that fact did not deter me,
I told myself it didn't matter.
I was dead set and determined
To see that gobbler on a platter.

When the kids perceived my purpose,
They turned on the tears and pleas.
Then, the wife joined in their chorus,
And that brought me to my knees.

So I told my grieving family
They could dry up, and relax.
I concealed my disappointment--
Went and put away the axe.

Came the dinner of Thanksgiving,
Not a sad face could be found.
And our live Thanksgiving turkey
Was the gladdest bird around. 

We gathered around the table,
And I humbly asked the blessing--
While Tom gobbled down his corn, outside,
We had hotdogs and dressing. 


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BUTIKING PASAS

Butiking Pasas


Sa kisame ng bahay, itong si Butiking Pasas
Ay minsang nakipaglaro sa kanyang mga KAIBIGAN
Kanyang inaliw, mga pakpak na kumikinang, pumapagaspas
Binola ang bawat lipad na kay panglaw
Habang sa isip, may nabubuo’t nakaambang kalokohan
Tila naiinggit sa kanilang kakayahan

Nang hindi na sila nakatingin, tumalikod lang saglit
Nagsimula ng ibuka kanyang mapinsalang bunganga’t bibig
Nilantad matatalas na dila, na may malaasidong laway
Na tutunaw unti-unit sa kanilang katauhan

At sa isang kisap mata, dila’y pumulupot, sumalaksak, 
Nilunok, nilamon sila ng buong-buo, walang kamalay-malay 
Sila’y kinitil, nalinlang ng mga matatalim na SALITA,
Kawawang mga KAIBIGAN…
Kanilang magagandang LAMANG LOOB…
Tuluyan ng nawasak, nalusaw


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Tradition

Within these walls…
Fragrant aura of comfort
Freshly washed baby hair and sweet breath;
Passed around in soft pink pajamas
Laughter and wit from older minds;
Even though the stories are well used
Awkward ramblings of youngsters;
Still testing their wings
Warm delicious wafts of seasoned meat
And sugared pies
From a kitchen full of women;
Sharing recipes and secrets while sipping Chardonnay
Rambunctious giggles from upstairs;
Playing children’s games in pretty clothes
While piles of coats, hats, and purses
Sleep soundly on the guest room bed;
Along with one gray tabby cat
Crisp fallen leaves dance with shimmering snowflakes,
The first of the season
In a chilly November breeze
Just outside the door;
Painted a vibrant red
Illuminated by glowing amber post lamps;
Stalwart sentinels for our
Tradition… 
Within these wonderful walls


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It Takes A Whole Village to Raise a Child: The Farmer

It Takes A Whole Village to Raise a Child: The Farmer

It has been said that it takes a whole village
To raise a child; How does a farmer help
Families raise the children?

Farmers live near the village; and together,
Everyone helps raise the children.
How do they help?

The farmers near the village grow food to sell.
They plant, tend, and harvest vegetable crops.
Veggies: lettuce, beets, cucumber, and tomatoes
Collard greens, cabbage, onions, and potatoes
Green beans, artichoke, peanuts, the list and work
Goes on and on and on— 
Farmers hire many workers to harvest their many crops.
Products are then, sold and sent to many vendors.
Although there are still some independent farmers,
Some farmers, like those in olden days, grow on rural farms.
Families, men, women, and children working together,
Using hoes, beasts of burden and hand plows to work the soil.
Children helping along side watching adult examples—
However, these days, big agriculture businesses own farms. 
They use huge machinery to operate their many acres.
Food producing farms: planting and harvesting to feed masses.
Their products, like smaller independent farmers’ products,
Are sent to markets in their homelands and abroad.
In the process of providing food and cotton for people,
Agriculture businesses and farmers alike set examples.
Good or bad, the children watch wide eyed
And ears perked!


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A Burger And A Fry

What was better than pumpkin
pie stuffed in my eye? Nothing
more than a burger and a fry..
That's why I wonder why? 
If pancakes are great at 
breakfest time? A sandwich
is great at lunchtime? 
A spaghetti a great meal at 
dinner time? But what was 
better than just old fashion
ham on rye? Nothing more
than a burger and a fry..

Lunchtime Poetry by Kim Robin Edwards
Copyright 2010,2014..All rights reserved.


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Shake, Rattle and Roll - Big Joe Turner

Third verse:
I'm like a one-eyed cat peepin' in a seafood sto'
I'm like a one-eyed cat peepin' in a seafood sto'
Well I can look at you and tell you ain' no child no mo'
***************************************************************
A few interpretations for this visually challanged and rather paranoid creature:

Still makes me hungry just don't LOOK good as it used to or
Still smells good, just ain't sure what I'm SMELLIN' no more or
Don't LOOK good as it used to, Don't SMELL good as it used to and
Definitely don't TASTE good as it used to or...

I was born that way, so what? or
Used to have two, now I only got one and
That's all you need to peep with anyways and
I think that's all you got left too so...

Let's put our eyes together on this thing and
Let's sneak over there and tom-peep that hole and
You peep on the women seafood and tell me about it and
I'll peep on the men seafood and tell you about it and...

Wait a minute here, something's not...
No, no I'm not gay! I swear I'm not!
I know by the above verse it might appear that way but
I swear to god! I swear to god I never...

Alright now, this has gone JUST ABOUT FAR ENOUGH and
You can't hardly tell them apart anyway and
The men don't even have one...they just kinda sprinkle, you know and
The rest just...How do I know? Well I-uh...read it somewhere and...

Oh, just kiss my big you-know-what! and
Wait!...I-I mean...if you're a FEMALE fish you can or a lady uh...
Oyster? Or girl crab or ..Hey, stop that!...Ow!
I didn't say...Ouch! Why you!...(Sigh) let's try this again, shall we?
*****************************************************************
Sorry folks...Just had to get this out of my system...Hope you think it's funny and
What?... WELL!! Kiss my-my uh...Elbow!...yeah, that's it! My elbow...
*****************************************************************
Bill Haley and the Comets became rich and famous for doing a 'sanitized' version of this song in 1954... Big Joe's original was considered too suggestive and sexual for white audiences...

Second verse for example:
'Way you wear those dresses, the sun come shinin' thru
Way you wear those dresses, the sun come shinin' thru
I can't believe my eyes all that mess belong to you'

(In 'proper' English: THE way you wear those dresses) 




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Canning Days Back Home

Germ-free Mason jars, hot from the pot of boiling water, gurgling on the cast iron wood stove, stood ready to receive the fruits and vegetables, fresh from the fields and orchards. Lids and sealing rings locked in the freshness. Mama, in her apron skillfully flavored the veggies as she prepared for meals months ahead. The old pressure cooker hissed as it played its part in preserving the bounty of the family farm. Preserves, jams and jellies, sealed in wax, filled the cupboard just waiting for future hot buttered biscuits. 

Peeling, dicing, chopping, pickling were all part of the process that brought kin from far away to socialize and join in preserving food for times when the land rested and awaited the start of a new season. 

Outside, Sauerkraut (layer of shredded cabbage, layer of salt,) repeated and compressed, awaiting fermentation filled the depth of a Crock on the front porch.

These glimpses of the times that are all but gone will remain with me forever. Life was tough at times but love was the balm that treated the abrasions of near poverty. And the tender touch of those who came for “Canning Days” was felt until the last jar was consumed. God’s bounty awaited, and next year’s promises stood always before us.



Written by: John Posey 10/21/13
Inspired by Canning Colors, 
A poem by Donna Jones


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Summer Fun

I remember back when times were simple. You could have your milk
delivered to your door. One of my favorite memories was waiting for the
Helm’s bakery livery to drive slowly down our street, alerting us with his
musical whistle. Specially built Chevy suburban panel wagon’s, bright
and shiny yellow, contained the most heavenly scents of do-nuts and
cinnamon swirls, rolls and breads to delight the most discerning. Our driver,
we called by name, would stop, get out of his seat and come to the back to
open double doors to the smiling faces, of usually about three or four neighbor
kids besides my sister and myself. The most difficult part was trying to decide
what delicious pastry we would put on our monthly tab. Fine wooden drawers
with glass windows let colorful do-nuts peek through. We would get our usual loaf
of potato bread mom would tell us to buy, but then, quite often we were treated to
a glazed jelly do-nut or a chocolate covered cream filled éclair. Mmmmm my taste
buds tingle at the fond memories. Those succulent delights would be out of the bag
and into our mouths before we hit the front door. By the time we got inside all that
would be left would be little pieces of sticky wax paper and our gooey little hands.
As I recall those happy memories of the late ‘50’s, my only regret is that I am sorry my
children were not given the thrill of hearing “Here comes the Helmsman”, let’s beat feet!

© September 12, 2012


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WHAT?

WHAT?

Thanksgiving’s on the way
This had crossed my mind
But what?
While shopping the mall yesterday I came on this display –
Who could miss it? – 
Shelves and shelves full of teddy bears    nutcrackers
    dolls    delicate ornaments    and then!
    this big open square rimmed with the most perfect 
    synthetic trees one might imagine – silver trees    green                      
    trees    blue trees    even a red tree
    all decorated magnificently 
In the middle    exactly in the middle of the square – a stage          
    an empty throne    and this short    white slat-fence              
    enclosing the whole
I shook my head
What happened to Thanksgiving?
Who the hell is thinking about Thanksgiving?
    certainly not the merchants!
Well    I wandered down the aisle toward the food court    
    and    guess what?
I come across a pen with a real live turkey strutting around
Seems I was wrong about the merchants
So?    To top it off – in the food court    at one of the tables
   there sits a man in suspenders     white tee shirt    red   
   trousers   red coat draped across the back of the chair    a 
   phony white beard    red cap lying on the table
He is one ugly    bony faced    misshapen human being
Santa’s on lunch break    gravy and partly chewed food
   spilled down his chin    bald head red as a beet
I can’t help staring at him    totally freaked
He looks my way    smiles
“Gobble    gobble”    says St. Nick


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Corny Dog Man

I am Corny Dog Man,
the fave Super Hero in all the land.
My main mission is to hand out free
cornmeal-batter covered foot long
hot dogs skewered on a stick
to every hungry girl and boy
in the whole wide blessed world.
My sidekick Honey Mustard Girl
is always right by my side
with the sweet tasty dip
for more added enjoyment
for all of my myriad of kiddie fans.
Never fear kiddos, I’ll be there to
make sure one and all will receive at
least one yummy to the tummy meal
before I fly back to Junk Food Paradise to
refill my Biggie Boy Backpack with many more
foot long corny dogs for your eating pleasure.


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Bread Basket of the World

the quiet of the spring day was broken by the noise and shouts in the fields belching smoke the great iron beast dropping its sharp blades into the soil took large bites into the soft belly of the earth warm and moist the soil yielded to the blades as the monster moved quickly forward leaving straight lines of soil like long ribbons behind following was yet another of the beasts smoothing the rows and carefully planting seeds into the long ribbons of soil the season of planting had begun and another year awaited for the time when the soil would give up the long awaited harvest of its crops the call of that grand lady welcoming all to our shores with her message: "bring me your hungry and tired, and we will care for them", was being answered America's feeding of the world's hungry had begun, and the great food basket of the country was about to be filled the first tender shoots began to appear - small and fragile at first - and then with the aid of a soft rain grew stronger and taller looking over the fields the long green ribbons of the manna of the soil - soybeans, corn, sugarcane and the once king of them all, cotton, now reduced to a lowly position due to cost and price - all were about to fill the breadbasket of the world the great crops of the South all in one of many fields spread out as far as the eye could see great green ribbons - swaying in the soft summer breeze majestically saying to the world that the time would soon be near to provide a filling of the baskets of the world another season, another planting, another feeding - the busy cycle had begun as had been done since the earliest days of the nation corn planter, bean puller, cane cutter and cotton picker of the world, the great smoke belching, iron monsters of the fields had begun their work. rest would not be an option until the work was done and the plates of the world filled with the products from these southern fields


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Chop sticks

There in a land foreign
Folks did not give us forks
Instead they said...
 "chop the food with sticks" 

The sticks stuck to my hands...
l could not eat
From across the table a voice said ...
"well then, use your hands instead"


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A Very Fine Line - The Restaurant

I just walked past the restaurant
A terrific place I used to go
Early in the evening hours
Of a chilly and recent past night
The fullness of the moon cast a memory
Reminders of my having traveled to these places so often
beneath its comfortable glow.

Places like this I used to dine
In what seems like so many moons ago
Could it have really just have been
Only seemingly late last year?
And then I realized I was outside a window

On the outside looking in
I am on the outside looking in
Of a place where I might or could have been
Tonight or any other evening
And I had been here oh so recently
Only a very short year ago.

Today the price of entry to this place
Is way beyond my meager means.
I recollected that being seen here
Had been so important to me
Now it is the last thought I hold dear.

I saw the fancy tables
of where I used to dine
With only the finest crystal
That held the finest wines.

I saw romantic candles
Flickering and burning bright
I saw tables surrounded with beaming faces
Flushed and filled with anticipatory delight
Anticipation of the wondrous delicacies
They would all soon have and behold.

I saw the sommelier pouring wine
Bottles and endless bottles
Of all the nectars considered to be in vogue
Every one of their prices
Deemed them to taste like liquid gold.

All drinks designed to compliment
The amazing and stylish cuisines
Posh dinners were arriving quickly
Looking as though from magazines
Arranged and prepared with minute details
Nothing ever missing, nothing out of place
Happiness was everywhere.
Joy radiated from every face.

And as the November wind
Begins to blow
I turned my head to go
To walk toward my empty street
My scarf wrapped tightly against the night.
Striding ever more quickly
Trying to beat the wind and cold
I had some thoughts and revelations
About that what I had just seen.

About those who have never been waited upon
Never in their whole lives
And about those who dine within those walls
Whose thoughts have never even considered
That they could end up on the outside looking in.

I who now know for certain
That it is such a very thin line
Between being poor and living fine.

And now I have to wonder
If being there had been some sort of sin
And now that is now the reason
I am on the outside
On the outside looking in
To The Restaurant.

(November 15, 2010 Wausau, Wisconsin)

(c) Copyright 2010 by Christine A Kysely, All Rights Reserved 


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Biscuits

Tall Aunt Euvela Made biscuits for our dinner It was requested of the crowd How many biscuits are required? My daddy said, "I always eat two." Uncle Troy said, " You won't eat two of Euvela's." When dinner was eaten, All the dishes washed. Uncle Troy said," Morgan, two you stopped short of." Daddy said, "Troy, you was right those biscuits were as big as plate." He continued, "No one could eat two of Euvela's biscuits." That woman had those big hands with long fingers to match her six foot height..


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O B E S I T Y

O B E S I T Y Before forbidden words dawn to confess Come... Uncoil your taste-buds for me Entrust you health fully to thee Yours truly, FOOD ___________________________________ Enamored beyond possible reproach I opened my mouth for crumbs of tasty Crumbs later become spoonfuls Spoonfuls turned to one, two, three plateful Appetite feast in crescendo of daily treats Boosting my body: front and rear - pound per pound My clothes then groan: a cri de couer Yet, desirous mouth craved for more and more Eating up to the crust and core of everything Months passed, Bigger! BIGGER, I come to be. 'Til even walking and standing, I can't do My room - my only day and night intimate boo My children, I robbed tardily of their joys As their focus and attention divided by two Fats stored everywhere on my bod Gradually they are killing me - stealing my breaths An oxygen via prongs must be on beside to help me breathe My back an archipelago of aching ulcer... Comestibles become my sweetest agony Breaking me and my dignity so gently Obesity then my heavy tumbling story © O. E. Guillermo 10:51pm, Oct. 17, 2014


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Christmas Eve from Mouse's Viewpoint

It’s Christmas Eve and through the house There creeps a curious little mouse. He climbs into the big arm chair And finds the cookies waiting there. He only takes the smallest bite. Santa will find his treat tonight. He gazes with wonder at the tree And the bright wrapped gifts left there to be A mystery tale to tell his spouse, When he gets home, this curious mouse. What an adventure it has been, He has drunk of some spilled over gin, That had been left upon the table. His wife will think it is a fable He has concocted to amuse her. She is home-bound, we must excuse her. He once came home all out of breath To say he had been scared to death By a huge rat with fluffy tail. She noticed he was very pale. “While I was nibbling off some cheese To bring to you, my love, to please. He almost had me in his paws. I’m sure he wasn’t Santa Claus”. But this night is so very quiet. He spies some fruitcake, has to try it. It reminds him of that sip of gin And wonders if his head will spin. He hears a noise, runs for his life, Carrying fruitcake for his wife. Christmas morning, spread before their eyes For the baby mice, a grand surprise. Their mama had fixed a Christmas meal From food their dad managed to steal. A bit of butter, a glob of jam And a fairly good-sized piece of ham. Bread crumbs saved from other forays. They had enough to eat for days. Those little mice would never waste it. If they didn’t like it they’d still taste it. This food their mamma set before them, Their dad risked his life to get it for them.


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Left Alone

I am Canine lupus familiaris
Known as dog
Man’s best friend
Someone to fetch 
Someone to catch with
Someone to walk 
Since I cannot speak
I watch and listen 
I also watch my master drink sour water from cans
As he and his friends laugh
Their shrill laughter becoming louder and louder
Their voices hurting my ears until I leave the room.

One week master was excited
The phone rang constantly 
A jarring message
A three day weekend
More sour water
More loud noise
Then suddenly I was left alone
Quickly and firmly
The door closed to me
At first I was glad for the silence
My eyes grew accustomed to the dark
Hungry, I searched the house
Found food and some water
I could smell the bags of dog food in the pantry
But it was no use
I couldn’t unlock the door
But I was brave
I didn’t panic
I made do with what I had
I conserved what little food was left in my doggie bowl
I drank water only when needed
I pooped in the bathroom
Like my Master always did
But it wasn’t enough
By the third day the water was gone
The doggie bowl empty.

When the door opened three days later
Master walked in
Sour water on his breathe
Short angry hissing words escaped his lips
When he found me
Alone and hungry
Rubbing his face
More short words followed
Anger directed at himself for neglecting me
Then he hugged me
Suddenly there was water
There was food
Looking up at him
My eyes told him
My father was the Wolf
From the frozen North
My mother the She Wolf
Who ruled the forest
And guarded the wolf dens
I came from strong genes
I learned how to survive.


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Shameless

Curry. Cumin. Saffron.
Mmmm, the hallways always smell of spice,
her seventy-year-old body perfecting the rhythm of movement
from icebox to oven in her efficiency kitchenette.
Tangerine wall paint cracks and mixes carelessly 
with bits of spice yet lingering in the air; it
follows her, this aroma that eats the eater, 
dancing around her skirts
like faeries honoring their faerie queen.
She knows this, and smiles at the sliver of sun peeking through her window.

Down the corridor
people begin their ritual of recognition, then sniffing,
and finally a smile that reveals anticipation. 
No one goes hungry inside Apartment A6 and everyone has seconds.  
Lunch and dinner, breakfast too 
if a body is moving about as dawn surfaces. 
Though small, her main floor seems to expand
beyond the boundaries of walls,
everyone cross-legged and eager to devour dishes 
few could pronounce and none could forget.

A legend among the two hundred desperate palates;
today, however, souls wander lost through the hallways 
because the lucky have snaked their way into heaven
and left the masses to a barren, tasteless fate.
As the onions, okra and potatoes, flavored
with a hint of saffron and even less ginger,
entice bodies five deep and ten across,
our greedy fingers and mouths offer no thoughts of others
going without while dripping sauce falls onto our legs
and Berndi seems content with the pleasure she’s wrought.



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Laundry

He glances through the curtains as she leaves.

And he knew she was going with him instead.

Desperately he washes his soul of her but its for naught.

And  he hangs each feeling on the line and the cool breeze.

She walks to the corner and gets into his car and flips her hair.

He always loved the way she flipped her hair and the body after a drink.

Her body would glisten with the sweat of his thrust and the bite on his shoulder.

The car pulls away and he watches the lights drive off with his heart and the bite.

The laundry machine moves like her and shudders and vibrates.

But she will return with food from the Chinaman.

Chinese food was how he knew.

She never ate Chinese food except afterwards.

The clothes lay fluttering in the night air as his heart dried.

And she came home with egg rolls and the feint smell of polo.


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Thanksgiving Is Just That

It's funny how we associate things.  They become one with each other.  Who can imagine an Easter without the bunny, or losing a tooth and not being paid a visit by the tooth fairy.  And Christmas would be unthinkable without Santa.  So that is why, I guess, that I still remember one particular Thanksgiving from my youth.

Back then, turkeys at the market were fresh, not frozen and encased in plastic as they are today.  They also represented an extra expense on an already tight food budget.  So my mother made arrangements with the market manager to set up a layaway of sorts, paying some each week, and they promised to hold one for her.

I remember when, on the afternoon before Thanksgiving day, she sent me over to the grocer to pick up the turkey.  I jumped on my bike and rode downtown to Converse Market.  Walking up to the door, I found it locked.  Shading my eyes, I pressed my nose against the window and saw that all the lights were off.  Turns out they had closed early that day to give their employees a little more time to spend with their families.

When I returned home and told my mother what had happened, the look on her face was one of devastation.  What would Thanksgiving be without a turkey?  I thought my dad would be mad, but instead he just said “we've got food in the house don't we”?  And we did.

So, although the letdown of a Thanksgiving without the traditional bird could have been a disaster,  on that particular day, we chose instead to give thanks for what we had, and, as a family, dived into our pork chops with all the fixings.


11/19/2011


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It Takes A Whole Village to Raise a Child: The Truckers

The Truckers:
It has been said that it takes a whole village
To raise a child; How does the village help
Families raise the children?

Truckers live in the village; and together, they,
Along with everyone else helps raise the children.
How do they help?

The truckers transport the goods that merchants
Need so the merchants can sell the things 
That folks need to be smart, strong, healthy,
Entertained, clothed, and happy.
They work around the world…endlessly. 
Delivering products. Through towns and cities
Driving here, driving there; delivering goods.
Back in the times of the horse and carriages,
The “truckers” used horses or pushed handcarts.
If someone had an extra hog to trade or
Crops to sell, they usually bought directly.
The farmers or someone else in the village
Helped deliver the things that needed to be delivered.
Together, people worked, struggled, and helped
One another.  Children were responsible. 
Their help was needed for survival…appreciated.
Everyone in the village helped to raise the children.
Even the children helped with the younger.
People interacted, closely.  Thus, they helped raise the children. 
Today, men and women still help raise the village children.
The children watch truckers on the road.
Driving, passing, changing lanes, shopping in shops
They set examples, good or bad.
And children watch wide eyed with ears perked!

© Dane Ann Smith-Johnsen
March 19, 2010
Poetic form:  Free Verse

© Dane Ann Smith-Johnsen
March 19, 2010
Poetic form:  Free Verse


Details | Narrative | |

a purple planet

One night and one
sound
one place in a crowd
too many flowers
no room for a frown
places are higher
the World and the news
people and places
a distance for spaces
a planet with wastelands
a future with grape lands
cloudy with rooms
more flowers and brooms
jewels and the bunnies
bracelets for no money
a panther and the day light
a creature and the new sights
blue wars that go around the moon
makes prettier roses
and more waters bloom


Details | Narrative | |

Making money off the church contest

At the end of every service each Sunday afternoon,
While walking out the back doors many sing a special tune,

Tables are set up with food and toiletries on top,
It becomes like a free food store or a gift shop,

Some Sundays there is bread, cakes and different brands of cereal,
Other times there are candles, clothes and cosmetic material,

Whatever the blessing, it is open to anyone from the congregation,
This is just an extra, not the church’s obligation

Now some people who attend are very poor, while others just have hard weeks,
Even if you’re wealthy you’re more than welcome to take a peek.

One Sunday there were boxes of sweet scented candles
I watched as a woman took more than she could handle

I offered to help her bring the boxes to her car
I knew that she had parked very far

When I got to her trunk what I did see, were ten boxes, each holding about twenty!
At first I laughed and found it kind of funny

“You must enjoy lighting candles" I said, she said "no it’s all for money"
My eyes opened wide and I asked her to clarify,
She proceeded to tell me everything she gets free, she puts on the internet for others to buy,

Now I ask you is she a genius or a criminal?
Is this something that should be viewed as minimal?

This is like Robin Hood stealing from the poor to make himself rich,
I don’t think that I am wrong for seeing a serious glitch,

The stuff that’s supplied is to help  people that are struggling,
Yet this lady thinks its ok that she is smuggling,

That was the last box I ever offered to carry,
I hope that these act's of hers will somehow tarry.

By: Sabina Nicole
Contest:
Genius or criminal " True Story"