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Poetry Terms Beginning With 'K'

Poetry Terms - k. This is a comprehensive resource of poetry terms beginning with the letter k.


Poetry Terminology by Letter


Keatsian

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Definition

In the manner/style of John Keats. See also negative capability and mansion of many apartments.


Kenning

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Definition

In literature, a kenning is a compound poetic phrase, a figure of speech, substituted for the usual name of a person or thing. Kennings work in much the same way as epithets and verbal formulae, and were commonly inserted into Old English poetic lines. In its simplest form, it comprises two terms, one of which (the 'base word'), is made to relate to the other to convey a meaning neither has alone.


Kimo

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Definition

A post-Haiku poetic form , consisting of three lines of 10, 7, and 6 syllables. This form of poetry was invented in Israel.


Kinetic Poetry

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Definition

Poetry which gains momentum from the careful layout of the letters/words/lines on the page. See concrete poetry.


Kit-Cat Club

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Definition

18th century literary club whose members included: Joseph Addison, Richard Steele, William Congreve, Sir John Vanbrugh and Sir Samuel Garth. They met at the house of a pastry cook called Christopher Kat (or Cat) in Shire Lane, London. Many of the members had their portraits painted by Sir Godfrey Kneller.


Kitsch

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Definition

Pretentious, low-quality work which is 'thrown together'.


Kwansaba

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Definition

The Kwansaba is a non-rhyming form that consists of seven lines of seven words per line and each word can not include more than seven letters unless it's a proper noun. It's based on Kwanzaa, the African American holiday that celebrates seven principles.


Kyrielle

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Definition

A kyrielle is written in rhyming couplets or quatrains. It uses the phrase "Lord have mercy", or a variant on it, as a refrain as the second line of the couplet or last line of the quatrain. In less strict usage, other phrases like "O God, be merciful to me", and sometimes single words, are used as the refrain.