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Husband Animal Poems | Husband Poems About Animal

These Husband Animal poems are examples of Husband poems about Animal. These are the best examples of Husband Animal poems written by international PoetrySoup poets

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Bob had been a lonely man ever since
His wife of fifty years had passed.
“Lord, let me join her.” he would pray.
“Let this day be my last.”

Each day, he went to the cemetery,
Just a short walk down the street.
After their talk, he would water her flowers
And hear passers-by whisper, “How sweet.”

One gray and misty morning,
He had hoped for sunnier skies
To plant fall bloomers at her graveside;
But, there, to his surprise…

Stood an old dog beside her stone;
Thin and dirty, but he struck a handsome pose.
He whined as Bob approached, as if to say,
“I could use a friend, you know.”

He sat calmly as Bob planted flowers,
Carefully sniffing each one Bob put in place.
Then, after the last one was planted,
He sniffed it; then turned and licked Bob’s face.

Bob smiled. “I had a dog when I was young…
Pal…he was a mighty good one too.
So, if you don’t mind old fella,
That’s what I’ll call you.”

Pal may have been an old dog,
But he was smart and handsome in his way;
So they made a deal, Bob would give him a meal
And a bath, if he decided to stay.

Pal loved his bath, then rolled in the grass.
He slept on a blanket in the den.
In the night, he dragged it next to Bob’s bed. 
He intended to be Bob’s best friend.

Pal was such a good dog, housebroken too;
Never made a mess or got in trouble.
He knew about newspapers, slippers and Frisbees;
And when Bob called, he ‘d come on the double.

Yes, Pal gave Bob’s life new purpose.
A special bond of friendship was cast.
And never again did Bob pray, 
“Lord, let this day be my last.”

For twelve years, the very best of friends,
Together night and day;
And so it was, until one night,
Both quietly passed away.

The next morning, an old woman,
Tears welling in her sad and lonely eyes,
Brought flowers to her husband’s grave;
But there, to her surprise….

Stood an old dog beside the stone, 
Thin an dirty, but he struck a handsome pose.
He whined as she approached, as if to say,
“I could use a friend, you know.”

He sat calmly as she took old flowers
And put fresh ones in their place. 
He carefully sniffed the fresh ones,
Then turned and licked her face.

She smiled.  “I had a dog when I was young...
a good one too.  His name was Pal.”

Copyright © Robert Candler

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True Love

True Love

The English language does not serve up justice to the word ‘Love’.
It allows for an unrestricted usage relative to the object of our affection.
“I love my house, and I love my car; I love my dog, and I love my cat”.

If the equity in my house rises high enough, I will sell it and buy a better one.
If my car no longer performs or I desire to have a new one, I’ll sell or trade it.
My dog stands by me, and he’s my best friend.  My cat is quiet and very comforting.

“I love my teachers, and I love my preachers: I love my parents and my siblings”.
I love my job, and I love my blue suede shoes; I love my friends and my enemies”.
I tell you, there is no end to the things that I love without much distinction.

I love my husband; I love my wife; Now hold on! This is where the red flag must fall.
This is where the defining line of true love is drawn in the sand, and here, I take my stand. There are obviously hidden meanings when it comes to “Love” in the English language.

Why did the English not confer more with the Greeks in matters of the “Love Word”?
Would my wife not be much more appreciative of a  “Love Word” from me if she knew that my choice of words was different from, let’s say those used to describe my affinity for a professional football team?  I think yes.

Anyway, I do “LOVE” my wife far more and far longer than I ‘love’ the raise I received on my job.  English is the only language I know.  So I am stuck with loving the coffee she made for me, and LOVING her with the same word.

The Greeks seemed to have had a better idea.  In the Greek, there are at least three words for “Love”.  Those words are very relevant at this point.  Phileo, Eros, and Agape express three distinct meanings of “Love”.   Phileo love is a brotherly love from which we get the English word Philadelphia.  Eros is a romantic love from which we get the word Erotic.  In Christian theology, Agape is the divine love, or God’s love for mankind.

And now a final word, especially to all of us who are married.  Here is one way to clear everything up and cover all the bases of love.  Herein lies a way to not just hit a home run, but a grand slam. Say these words to your spouse:  “Honey, let me count the ways that I love thee; my dear, believe me when I say, I love thee in the English, and I love thee in the Greek;  I Phileo you, because you are my best friend; I Eros you, because you are my only lover; and I Agape you with a love so divine. 09292015 (contest )

Copyright © curtis johnson

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The Fanatical Dog Lover

The Fanatical Dog Lover

By Elton Camp

Dog ownership has much to commend
Fido can be a companion and friend

From his master, he will never swerve
Giving love even when it’s not deserved

This isn’t written, canines to condemn
But to rebuke any too devoted to them

Sue is one of those about whom I write
Her several dogs are a shame and a fright

Her husband works to get what they need
She spends far too much buying dog feed

Their veterinary bills are a major expense
It makes her husband wish he were hence

Sue tells him that her dogs are her delight
To begrudge spending on them isn’t right

Plus, she thinks that he shouldn’t care
That the house is rife with dog hair

On their bed, Sue lets the dogs sleep
But poor hubby mustn’t say a peep

And just as she’s done many times before
Sue finds there is room for just one more

For in the classified an ad does say
“To a good home, a dog to give away”

Her husband gives out a disgusted shout
Packs his bags and angrily moves out

Sue says, “To do that there is no excuse.
For one who hates dogs, I have no use.”

Before the poor fellow finally re-wed
He decreed, “No dogs in house or bed!”

Copyright © Elton Camp