Submit Your Poems
Get Your Premium Membership


See and share Beautiful Nature Photos and amazing photos of interesting places



Grief Haiku Poems | Haiku Poems About Grief

These Grief Haiku poems are examples of Haiku poems about Grief. These are the best examples of Grief Haiku poems written by international PoetrySoup poets

1234
Details | Haiku |

Lightning and Thunder

Lightning and thunder,
Vortex swirls above my head.
I cannot hear you.


Details | Haiku |

The Less I Have

the less i have of
the additional use of
the more it breaks down


Details | Haiku |

Strong Tears

Because tears are meant
To be a symbol of strength
Even in hard days.


Details | Haiku |

THE HEALING SUN

THE HEALING SUN


Painful long night passed
Tears on pillow ran many
Dreams forgot to come

Sun came through window
Found lonely suffering heart
Healing wound at once!


© Demetrios Trifiatis
    02 June 2013


Details | Haiku |

Ocean-ku

Rough, Wild, Dangerous
Sinking the Sailors and Ships
Breaking Hearts alas!


Details | Haiku |

Not fair

How cruel my heart
is!... To persist in beating
although you're gone...


Details | Haiku |

Genocide

Genocide

By Immaculata Ortner 


     We fought! But in vain!
We stretched, but our top was so high
     Our ground trembled as tears of our gods flooded our land


Details | Haiku |

haiku 11

white roses
collect diamond dew drops--
a choir sings


Details | Haiku |

Haiku 49

	
	rainy season 
	grief, white hydrangeas 
	hungry caterpillar



In part, The Haiku Society of America’s definition of a haiku reads, “Usually a haiku in English is written in three unrhymed lines of seventeen or fewer syllables.” Further, Japanese scholar Shigehisa Kuriyama states, “The 5-7-5 pattern by itself does not make a haiku.” (Gurga, p. 1). Contemporary English language haiku have departed radically from the 5-7-5 convention, including the Beat haiku of Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg, and Gary Snyder, the latter awarded the Masaoka Shiki International Haiku Grand Prize in 2004. The haiku of Robert Spiess are especially experimental.

I recommend two sources for further study of haiku: “Haiku: A Poet’s Guide,” by Lee Gurga, addresses haiku in it’s traditional form; “Haiku Poetics in Twentieth-Century Avant-Garde Poetry,” by Jeffery Johnson discusses haiku as realized by modernist poets.  

Speaking personally, it is most important for me to enjoy writing a haiku, correct form or not, and for my haiku to be enjoyed by the reader.




Details | Haiku |

Melancholy

	
	
	Melancholy
	
	rainy season 
	grief, white hydrangeas 
	hungry caterpillar


	A haikuette for “Haiku Wannabees”


1234