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Best Famous Stephen Crane Poems

Here is a collection of the all-time best famous Stephen Crane poems. This is a select list of the best famous Stephen Crane poetry. Reading, writing, and enjoying famous Stephen Crane poetry (as well as classical and contemporary poems) is a great past time. These top poems are the best examples of stephen crane poems.

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by Stephen Crane |

Blustering God

 i

Blustering God,
Stamping across the sky
With loud swagger,
I fear You not.
No, though from Your highest heaven You plunge Your spear at my heart, I fear You not.
No, not if the blow Is as the lightning blasting a tree, I fear You not, puffing braggart.
ii If Thou canst see into my heart That I fear Thee not, Thou wilt see why I fear Thee not, And why it is right.
So threaten not, Thou, with Thy bloody spears, Else Thy sublime ears shall hear curses.
iii Withal, there is One whom I fear: I fear to see grief upon that face.
Perchance, friend, He is not your God; If so, spit upon Him.
By it you will do no profanity.
But I -- Ah, sooner would I die Than see tears in those eyes of my soul.


by Stephen Crane |

In the desert

 In the desert
I saw a creature, naked, bestial,
Who, squatting upon the ground,
Held his heart in his hands,
And ate of it.
I said: "Is it good, friend?" "It is bitter - bitter," he answered; "But I like it Because it is bitter, And because it is my heart.
"


by Stephen Crane |

Tell brave deeds of war.

 "Tell brave deeds of war.
" Then they recounted tales, -- "There were stern stands And bitter runs for glory.
" Ah, I think there were braver deeds.


by Stephen Crane |

Two or three angels

 Two or three angels
Came near to the earth.
They saw a fat church.
Little black streams of people Came and went in continually.
And the angels were puzzled To know why the people went thus, And why they stayed so long within.


by Stephen Crane |

The wayfarer

 The wayfarer,
Perceiving the pathway to truth,
Was struck with astonishment.
It was thickly grown with weeds.
"Ha," he said, "I see that none has passed here In a long time.
" Later he saw that each weed Was a singular knife.
"Well," he mumbled at last, "Doubtless there are other roads.
"


by Stephen Crane |

Supposing that I should have the courage

 Supposing that I should have the courage
To let a red sword of virtue
Plunge into my heart,
Letting to the weeds of the ground
My sinful blood,
What can you offer me?
A gardened castle?
A flowery kingdom?

What? A hope?
Then hence with your red sword of virtue.


by Stephen Crane |

Once a man clambering to the housetops

 Once a man clambering to the housetops
Appealed to the heavens.
With strong voice he called to the deaf spheres; A warrior's shout he raised to the suns.
Lo, at last, there was a dot on the clouds, And -- at last and at last -- -- God -- the sky was filled with armies.


by Stephen Crane |

The chatter of a death-demon from a tree-top

 The chatter of a death-demon from a tree-top

Blood -- blood and torn grass --
Had marked the rise of his agony --
This lone hunter.
The grey-green woods impassive Had watched the threshing of his limbs.
A canoe with flashing paddle, A girl with soft searching eyes, A call: "John!" .
.
.
.
.
Come, arise, hunter! Can you not hear? The chatter of a death-demon from a tree-top.


by Stephen Crane |

A man toiled on a burning road

 A man toiled on a burning road,
Never resting.
Once he saw a fat, stupid ass Grinning at him from a green place.
The man cried out in rage, "Ah! Do not deride me, fool! I know you -- All day stuffing your belly, Burying your heart In grass and tender sprouts: It will not suffice you.
" But the ass only grinned at him from the green place.


by Stephen Crane |

I stood upon a highway

 I stood upon a highway,
And, behold, there came
Many strange peddlers.
To me each one made gestures, Holding forth little images, saying, "This is my pattern of God.
Now this is the God I prefer.
" But I said, "Hence! Leave me with mine own, And take you yours away; I can't buy of your patterns of God, The little gods you may rightly prefer.
"