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Best Famous Louisa May Alcott Poems

Here is a collection of the all-time best famous Louisa May Alcott poems. This is a select list of the best famous Louisa May Alcott poetry. Reading, writing, and enjoying famous Louisa May Alcott poetry (as well as classical and contemporary poems) is a great past time. These top poems are the best examples of louisa may alcott poems.

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by Louisa May Alcott | |

From The Short Story A Christmas Dream And How It Came True

 From our happy home 
Through the world we roam 
One week in all the year, 
Making winter spring 
With the joy we bring 
For Christmas-tide is here.
Now the eastern star Shines from afar To light the poorest home; Hearts warmer grow, Gifts freely flow, For Christmas-tide has come.
Now gay trees rise Before young eyes, Abloom with tempting cheer; Blithe voices sing, And blithe bells ring, For Christmas-tide is here.
Oh, happy chime, Oh, blessed time, That draws us all so near! "Welcome, dear day," All creatures say, For Christmas-tide is here.


by Louisa May Alcott | |

From The Short Story What The Swallows Did

 Swallow, swallow, neighbor swallow, 
Starting on your autumn flight, 
Pause a moment at my window, 
Twitter softly your good-night; 
For the summer days are over, 
All your duties are well done, 
And the happy homes you builded 
Have grown empty, one by one.
Swallow, swallow, neighbor swallow, Are you ready for your flight? Are all the feather cloaks completed? Are the little caps all right? Are the young wings strong and steady For the journey through the sky? Come again in early spring-time; And till then, good-by, good-by!


by Louisa May Alcott | |

Lily-Bell and Thistledown Song I

 Awake! Awake! for the earliest gleam 
Of golden sunlight shines 
On the rippling waves, that brightly flow 
Beneath the flowering vines.
Awake! Awake! for the low, sweet chant Of the wild-birds' morning hymn Comes floating by on the fragrant air, Through the forest cool and dim; Then spread each wing, And work, and sing, Through the long, bright sunny hours; O'er the pleasant earth We journey forth, For a day among the flowers.
Awake! Awake! for the summer wind Hath bidden the blossoms unclose, Hath opened the violet's soft blue eye, And awakened the sleeping rose.
And lightly they wave on their slender stems Fragrant, and fresh, and fair, Waiting for us, as we singing come To gather our honey-dew there.
Then spread each wing, And work, and sing, Through the long, bright sunny hours; O'er the pleasant earth We journey forth, For a day among the flowers.


by Louisa May Alcott | |

Lily-Bell and Thistledown Song II

 Thistledown in prison sings:

Bright shines the summer sun,
Soft is the summer air;
Gayly the wood-birds sing,
Flowers are blooming fair.
But, deep in the dark, cold rock, Sadly I dwell, Longing for thee, dear friend, Lily-Bell! Lily-Bell! Lily-Bell replies: Through sunlight and summer air I have sought for thee long, Guided by birds and flowers, And now by thy song.
Thistledown! Thistledown! O'er hill and dell Hither to comfort thee Comes Lily-Bell.


by Louisa May Alcott | |

The Frost-King - Song 1

 We are sending you, dear flowers 
Forth alone to die, 
Where your gentle sisters may not weep 
O'er the cold graves where you lie; 
But you go to bring them fadeless life 
In the bright homes where they dwell, 
And you softly smile that't is so, 
As we sadly sing farewell.
O plead with gentle words for us, And whisper tenderly Of generous love to that cold heart, And it will answer ye; And though you fade in a dreary home, Yet loving hearts will tell Of the joy and peace that you have given: Flowers, dear flowers, farewell!


by Louisa May Alcott | |

The Frost-King - Song II

 Brighter shone the golden shadows; 
On the cool wind softly came 
The low, sweet tones of happy flowers, 
Singing little Violet's name.
'Mong the green trees was it whispered, And the bright waves bore it on To the lonely forest flowers, Where the glad news had not gone.
Thus the Frost-King lost his kingdom, And his power to harm and blight.
Violet conquered, and his cold heart Warmed with music, love, and light; And his fair home, once so dreary, Gay with lovely Elves and flowers, Brought a joy that never faded Through the long bright summer hours.
Thus, by Violet's magic power, All dark shadows passed away, And on the home of happy flowers The golden light for ever lay.
Thus the Fairy mission ended, And all Flower-Land was taught The "Power of Love," by gentle deeds That little Violet wrought.


by Louisa May Alcott | |

The Rose Family - Song II

 O lesson well and wisely taught 
Stay with me to the last, 
That all my life may better be 
For the trial that is past.
O vanity, mislead no more! Sleep, like passions, long! Wake, happy heart, and dance again To the music of my song! O summer days, flit fast away, And bring the blithesome hour When we three wanderers shall meet Safe in our household flower! O dear mamma, lament no more! Smile on us as we come, Your grief has been our punishment, Your love has led us home.