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Best Famous Lewis Carroll Poems

Here is a collection of the all-time best famous Lewis Carroll poems. This is a select list of the best famous Lewis Carroll poetry. Reading, writing, and enjoying famous Lewis Carroll poetry (as well as classical and contemporary poems) is a great past time. These top poems are the best examples of lewis carroll poems.

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by Lewis Carroll | |

Theme with Variations

 I never loved a dear Gazelle-- 
Nor anything that cost me much: 
High prices profit those who sell, 
But why should I be fond of such? 
To glad me with his soft black eye 
My son comes trotting home from school; 
He's had a fight but can't tell why-- 
He always was a little fool! 

But, when he came to know me well, 
He kicked me out, her testy Sire: 
And when I stained my hair, that Belle 
Might note the change and this admire 

And love me, it was sure to dye 
A muddy green, or staring blue: 
Whilst one might trace, with half an eye, 
The still triumphant carrot through


by Lewis Carroll | |

Hiawathas photographing ( Part IV)

 Next to him the eldest daughter:
She suggested very little
Only asked if he would take her
With her look of 'passive beauty-'



Her idea of passive beauty
Was a squinting of the left-eye,
Was a drooping of the right-eye,
Was a smile that went up Sideways
To the corner of the nostrils.
Hiawatha, when she asked him Took no notice of the question Looked as if he hadn't heared it; But, when pointedly appealed to, Smiled in his peculiar manner, Coughed and said it 'didn't matter,' Bit his lip and changed the subject.
Nor in this was he mistaken, As the picture failed completely.
So in turn the other sisters.


by Lewis Carroll | |

Punctuality

 Man Naturally loves delay,
And to procrastinate;
Business put off from day to day
Is always done to late.
Let ever hour be in its place Firm fixed, nor loosely shift, And well enjoy the vacant space, As though a birthday gift.
And when the hour arrives, be there, Where'er that "there" may be; Uncleanly hands or ruffled hair Let no one ever see.
If dinner at "half-past" be placed, At "half-past" then be dressed.
If at a "quarter-past" make haste To be down with the rest Better to be before you time, Than e're to be behind; To open the door while strikes the chime, That shows a punctual mind.
Moral: Let punctuality and care Seize every flitting hour, So shalt thou cull a floweret fair, E'en from a fading flower


by Lewis Carroll | |

Hiawathas photographing ( Part I )

 FROM his shoulder Hiawatha 
Took the camera of rosewood, 
Made of sliding, folding rosewood; 
Neatly put it all together.
In its case it lay compactly, Folded into nearly nothing; But he opened out the hinges, Pushed and pulled the joints and hinges, Till it looked all squares and oblongs, Like a complicated figure In the Second Book of Euclid.
This he perched upon a tripod - Crouched beneath its dusky cover - Stretched his hand, enforcing silence - Said "Be motionless, I beg you!" Mystic, awful was the process.
All the family in order Sat before him for their pictures: Each in turn, as he was taken, Volunteered his own suggestions, His ingenious suggestions.


by Lewis Carroll | |

Photography Extraordinary

 The Milk-and-Water School 
Alas! she would not hear my prayer!
Yet it were rash to tear my hair;
Disfigured, I should be less fair.
She was unwise, I may say blind; Once she was lovingly inclined; Some circumstance has changed her mind.
The Strong-Minded or Matter-of-Fact School Well! so my offer was no go! She might do worse, I told her so; She was a fool to answer "No".
However, things are as they stood; Nor would I have her if I could, For there are plenty more as good.
The Spasmodic or German School Firebrands and Daggers! hope hath fled! To atoms dash the doubly dead! My brain is fire--my heart is lead! Her soul is flint, and what am I? Scorch'd by her fierce, relentless eye, Nothingness is my destiny!


by Lewis Carroll | |

Dedication

 Inscribed to a Dear Child:
In Memory of Golden Summer Hours
And Whispers of a Summer Sea 


Girt with a boyish garb for boyish task,
Eager she wields her spade: yet loves as well
Rest on a friendly knee, intent to ask
The tale he loves to tell.
Rude spirits of the seething outer strife, Unmeet to read her pure and simple spright, Deem if you list, such hours a waste of life, Empty of all delight! Chat on, sweet Maid, and rescue from annoy Hearts that by wiser talk are unbeguiled.
Ah, happy he who owns that tenderest joy, The heart-love of a child!


by Lewis Carroll | |

Madrigal

 (To Miss May Forshall.
) HE shouts amain, he shouts again, (Her brother, fierce, as bluff King Hal), "I tell you flat, I shall do that!" She softly whispers " 'May' for 'shall'!" He wistful sighed one eventide (Her friend, that made this Madrigal), "And shall I kiss you, pretty Miss!" Smiling she answered " 'May' for 'shall'!" With eager eyes my reader cries, "Your friend must be indeed a val- -uable child, so sweet, so mild! What do you call her?" "May For shall.
"


by Lewis Carroll | |

Ye Carpette Knyghte

 I have a horse - a ryghte good horse -
Ne doe Y envye those
Who scoure ye playne yn headye course
Tyll soddayne on theyre nose
They lyghte wyth unexpected force
Yt ys - a horse of clothes.
I have a saddel - "Say'st thou soe? Wyth styrruppes, Knyghte, to boote?" I sayde not that - I answere "Noe" - Yt lacketh such, I woote: Yt ys a mutton-saddel, loe! Parte of ye fleecye brute.
I have a bytte - a ryghte good bytte - As shall bee seene yn tyme.
Ye jawe of horse yt wyll not fytte; Yts use ys more sublyme.
Fayre Syr, how deemest thou of yt? Yt ys - thys bytte of rhyme.


by Lewis Carroll | |

A Game of Fives

 Five little girls, of Five, Four, Three, Two, One:
Rolling on the hearthrug, full of tricks and fun.
Five rosy girls, in years from Ten to Six: Sitting down to lessons - no more time for tricks.
Five growing girls, from Fifteen to Eleven: Music, Drawing, Languages, and food enough for seven! Five winsome girls, from Twenty to Sixteen: Each young man that calls, I say "Now tell me which you MEAN!" Five dashing girls, the youngest Twenty-one: But, if nobody proposes, what is there to be done? Five showy girls - but Thirty is an age When girls may be ENGAGING, but they somehow don't ENGAGE.
Five dressy girls, of Thirty-one or more: So gracious to the shy young men they snubbed so much before! Five PASSE girls - Their age? Well, never mind! We jog along together, like the rest of human kind: But the quondam "careless bachelor" begins to think he knows The answer to that ancient problem "how the money goes"!


by Lewis Carroll | |

Epilogue to Through the Looking Glass

 A boat, beneath a sunny sky
Lingering onward dreamily
In an evening of July --

Children three that nestle near,
Eager eye and willing ear
Pleased a simple tale to hear --

Long has paled that sunny sky:
Echoes fade and memories die:
Autumn frosts have slain July.
Still she haunts me, phantomwise Alice moving under skies Never seen by waking eyes.
Children yet, the tale to hear, Eager eye and willing ear, Lovingly shall nestle near.
In a Wonderland they lie, Dreaming as the days go by, Dreaming as the summers die: Ever drifting down the stream -- Lingering in the golden gleam -- Life what is it but a dream?


by Lewis Carroll | |

Echoes

 Lady Clara Vere de Vere
Was eight years old, she said:
Every ringlet, lightly shaken, ran itself in golden thread.
She took her little porringer: Of me she shall not win renown: For the baseness of its nature shall have strength to drag her down.
"Sisters and brothers, little Maid? There stands the Inspector at thy door: Like a dog, he hunts for boys who know not two and two are four.
" "Kind words are more than coronets," She said, and wondering looked at me: "It is the dead unhappy night, and I must hurry home to tea.
"


by Lewis Carroll | |

My Fancy

 I painted her a gushing thing,
With years about a score;
I little thought to find they were
A least a dozen more;
My fancy gave her eyes of blue,
A curly auburn head:
I came to find the blue a green,
The auburn turned to red.
She boxed my ears this morning, They tingled very much; I own that I could wish her A somewhat lighter touch; And if you ask me how Her charms might be improved, I would not have them added to, But just a few removed! She has the bear's ethereal grace, The bland hyaena's laugh, The footstep of the elephant, The neck of a giraffe; I love her still, believe me, Though my heart its passion hides; "She's all my fancy painted her," But oh! how much besides!


by Lewis Carroll | |

Acrostic

 Little maidens, when you look 
On this little story-book, 
Reading with attentive eye 
Its enticing history, 
Never think that hours of play 
Are your only HOLIDAY, 
And that in a HOUSE of joy 
Lessons serve but to annoy: 
If in any HOUSE you find 
Children of a gentle mind, 
Each the others pleasing ever-- 
Each the others vexing never-- 
Daily work and pastime daily 
In their order taking gaily-- 
Then be very sure that they 
Have a life of HOLIDAY.


by Lewis Carroll | |

The Voice of the Lobster

 ''Tis the voice of the Lobster: I heard him declare
'You have baked me too brown, I must sugar my hair.
' As a duck with its eyelids, so he with his nose Trims his belt and his buttons, and turns out his toes.
When the sands are all dry, he is gay as a lark, And will talk in contemptuous tones of the Shark: But, when the tide rises and sharks are around, His voice has a timid and tremulous sound.
' 'I passed by his garden, and marked, with one eye, How the Owl and the Panter were sharing a pie: The Panther took pie-crust, and gravy, and meat, While the Old had the dish as its share of the treat.
When the pie was all finished, the Owl, as a boon, Was kindly permitted to pocket the spoon: While the Panther received knife and fork with a growl, And concluded the banquet by [eating the owl.
]


by Lewis Carroll | |

My Fairy

 I have a fairy by my side 
Which says I must not sleep, 
When once in pain I loudly cried 
It said "You must not weep" 
If, full of mirth, I smile and grin, 
It says "You must not laugh" 
When once I wished to drink some gin 
It said "You must not quaff".
When once a meal I wished to taste It said "You must not bite" When to the wars I went in haste It said "You must not fight".
"What may I do?" at length I cried, Tired of the painful task.
The fairy quietly replied, And said "You must not ask".
Moral: "You mustn't.
"


by Lewis Carroll | |

Twinkle Twinkle Little Bat!

 How I wonder what you're at!'You know the song, perhaps?" "I've heard something like it," said Alice.
"It goes on, you know," the Hatter continued, "in this way: -- -- `Up above the world you fly, Like a teatray in the sky.
Twinkle, twinkle --'"


by Lewis Carroll | |

Another Acrostic ( In the style of Father William )

 "Are you deaf, Father William!" the young man said, 
"Did you hear what I told you just now? 
"Excuse me for shouting! Don't waggle your head 
"Like a blundering, sleepy old cow! 
"A little maid dwelling in Wallington Town, 
"Is my friend, so I beg to remark: 
"Do you think she'd be pleased if a book were sent down 
"Entitled 'The Hunt of the Snark?'" 


"Pack it up in brown paper!" the old man cried, 
"And seal it with olive-and-dove.
"I command you to do it!" he added with pride, "Nor forget, my good fellow to send her beside "Easter Greetings, and give her my love.
"


by Lewis Carroll | |

How Doth the Little Crocodile

 How doth the little crocodile
Improve his shining tail,
And pour the waters of the Nile
On every golden scale! 

How cheerfully he seems to grin
How neatly spreads his claws,
And welcomes little fishes in,
With gently smiling jaws!


by Lewis Carroll | |

A Boat beneath a Sunny Sky

 A BOAT beneath a sunny sky,
Lingering onward dreamily
In an evening of July --
Children three that nestle near,
Eager eye and willing ear,
Pleased a simple tale to hear --
Long has paled that sunny sky:
Echoes fade and memories die:
Autumn frosts have slain July.
Still she haunts me, phantomwise, Alice moving under skies Never seen by waking eyes.
Children yet, the tale to hear, Eager eye and willing ear, Lovingly shall nestle near.
In a Wonderland they lie, Dreaming as the days go by, Dreaming as the summers die: Ever drifting down the stream -- Lingering in the golden dream -- Life, what is it but a dream? THE END


by Lewis Carroll | |

Brother And Sister

 "SISTER, sister, go to bed! 
Go and rest your weary head.
" Thus the prudent brother said.
"Do you want a battered hide, Or scratches to your face applied?" Thus his sister calm replied.
"Sister, do not raise my wrath.
I'd make you into mutton broth As easily as kill a moth" The sister raised her beaming eye And looked on him indignantly And sternly answered, "Only try!" Off to the cook he quickly ran.
"Dear Cook, please lend a frying-pan To me as quickly as you can.
" And wherefore should I lend it you?" "The reason, Cook, is plain to view.
I wish to make an Irish stew.
" "What meat is in that stew to go?" "My sister'll be the contents!" "Oh" "You'll lend the pan to me, Cook?" "No!" Moral: Never stew your sister.