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Best Famous Grandfather Poems

Here is a collection of the all-time best famous Grandfather poems. This is a select list of the best famous Grandfather poetry. Reading, writing, and enjoying famous Grandfather poetry (as well as classical and contemporary poems) is a great past time. These top poems are the best examples of grandfather poems.

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by Donald Hall | |

Affirmation

 To grow old is to lose everything.
Aging, everybody knows it.
Even when we are young, we glimpse it sometimes, and nod our heads when a grandfather dies.
Then we row for years on the midsummer pond, ignorant and content.
But a marriage, that began without harm, scatters into debris on the shore, and a friend from school drops cold on a rocky strand.
If a new love carries us past middle age, our wife will die at her strongest and most beautiful.
New women come and go.
All go.
The pretty lover who announces that she is temporary is temporary.
The bold woman, middle-aged against our old age, sinks under an anxiety she cannot withstand.
Another friend of decades estranges himself in words that pollute thirty years.
Let us stifle under mud at the pond's edge and affirm that it is fitting and delicious to lose everything.


by Philip Levine | |

My Fathers The Baltic

 Along the strand stones, 
busted shells, wood scraps, 
bottle tops, dimpled 
and stainless beer cans.
Something began here a century ago, a nameless disaster, perhaps a voyage to the lost continent where I was born.
Now the cold winds of March dimple the gray, incoming waves.
I kneel on the wet earth looking for a sign, maybe an old coin, an amulet against storms, and find my face blackened in a pool of oil and water.
My grandfather crossed this sea in '04 and never returned, so I've come alone to thank creation as he would never for bringing him home to work, defeat, and death, those three blood brothers faithful to the end.
Yusel Prishkulnick, I bless your laughter thrown in the wind's face, your gall, your rages, your abiding love for women and money and all that money never bought, for what the sea taught you and you taught me: that the waves go out and nothing comes back.


by Edgar Lee Masters | |

Le Roy Goldman

 "What will you do when you come to die,
If all your life long you have rejected Jesus,
And know as you lie there, He is not your friend?"
Over and over I said, I, the revivalist.
Ah, yes! but there are friends and friends.
And blessed are you, say I, who know all now, You who have lost, ere you pass, A father or mother, or old grandfather or mother Some beautiful soul that lived life strongly, And knew you all through, and loved you ever, Who would not fail to speak for you, And give God an intimate view of your soul, As only one of your flesh could do it.
That is the hand your hand will reach for, To lead you along the corridor To the court where you are a stranger!


by Robert William Service | |

Rosy-Kins

 As home from church we two did plod,
"Grandpa," said Rosy, "What is God?"
Seeking an answer to her mind,
This is the best that I could find.
.
.
.
God is the Iz-ness of our Cosmic Biz; The high, the low, the near, the far, The atom and the evening star; The lark, the shark, the cloud, the clod, The whole darned Universe - that's God.
Some deem that others there be, And to them humbly bend the knee; To Mumbo Jumbo and to Joss, To Bud and Allah - but the Boss Is mine .
.
.
While there are suns and seas MY timeless God shall dwell in these.
In every glowing leaf He lives; When roses die His life he gives; God is not outside and apart From Nature, but her very heart; No Architect (as I of verse) He is Himself the Universe.
Said Rosy-kins: "Grandpa, how odd Is your imagining of God.
To me he's always just appeared A huge Grandfather with a beard.


by Robert William Service | |

The Old Armchair

 In all the pubs from Troon to Ayr
Grandfather's father would repair
With Bobby Burns, a drouthy pair,
 The glass to clink;
And oftenwhiles, when not too "fou,"
They'd roar a bawdy stave or two,
From midnight muk to morning dew,
 And drink and drink.
And Grandfather, with eye aglow And proper pride, would often show An old armchair where long ago The Bard would sit; Reciting there with pawky glee "The Lass that Made the Bed for Me;" Or whiles a rhyme about the flea That ne'er was writ.
Then I would seek the Poet's chair And plant my kilted buttocks there, And read with joy the Bard of Ayr In my own tongue; The Diel, the Daisy and the Louse The Hare, the Haggis and the Mouse, (What fornication and carouse!) When I was young.
Though Kipling, Hardy, Stevenson Have each my admiration won, Today, my rhyme-race almost run, My fancy turns To him who did Pegasus prod For me, Bard of my native sod, The sinner best-loved of God - Rare Robbie Burns.


by Robert William Service | |

The Centenarian

 Great Grandfather was ninety-nine
 And so it was our one dread,
That though his health was superfine
 He'd fail to make the hundred.
Though he was not a rolling stone No moss he seemed to gather: A patriarch of brawn and bone Was Great Grandfather.
He should have been senile and frail Instead of hale and hearty; But no, he loved a mug of ale, A boisterous old party.
'As frisky as a cold,' said he, 'A man's allotted span I've lived but now I plan to be A Centenarian.
' Then one night when I called on him Oh what a change I saw! His head was bowed, his eye was dim, Down-fallen was his jaw.
Said he: 'Leave me to die, I pray; I'm no more bloody use .
.
.
For in my mouth I found today-- A tooth that's loose.
'


by Chris Tusa | |

Alzheimer’s

 My grandmother’s teeth stare at her
from a mason jar on the nightstand.
The radio turns itself on, sunlight crawls through the window, and she thinks she feels her bright blue eyes rolling out her head.
She’s certain her blood has turned to dirt, that beetles haunt the dark hollow of her bones.
The clock on the kitchen wall is missing its big hand.
The potatoes in the sink are growing eyes.
She stares at my grandfather standing in the doorway, his smile flickering like the side of an axe.
Outside, in the yard, a chicken hops through the tall grass, looking for its head.


by Hilaire Belloc | |

Hildebrand

 Who was frightened by a Passing Motor, and was brought to Reason 

"Oh murder! What was that, Papa!"
"My child, It was a Motor-Car,
A most Ingenious Toy!
Designed to Captivate and Charm
Much rather than to rouse Alarm
In any English Boy.
"What would your Great Grandfather who Was Aide-de-Camp to General Brue, And lost a leg at Waterloo, And Quatre-Bras and Ligny too! And died at Trafalgar!- What would he have remarked to hear His Young Descendant shriek with fear, Because he happened to be near A Harmless Motor-Car! But do not fret about it! Come! We'll off to Town And purchase some!"


by Emily Dickinson | |

The Mountain sat upon the Plain

 The Mountain sat upon the Plain
In his tremendous Chair --
His observation omnifold,
His inquest, everywhere --

The Seasons played around his knees
Like Children round a sire --
Grandfather of the Days is He
Of Dawn, the Ancestor --


by Robert Desnos | |

Dove in the Arch

 Cursed!
be the father of the bride
of the blacksmith who forged the iron for the axe
with which the woodsman hacked down the oak
from which the bed was carved
in which was conceived the great-grandfather
of the man who was driving the carriage
in which your mother met your father.


by Russell Edson | |

The Family Monkey

 We bought an electric monkey, experimenting rather 
recklessly with funds carefully gathered since 
grandfather's time for the purchase of a steam monkey.
We had either, by this time, the choice of an electric or gas monkey.
The steam monkey is no longer being made, said the monkey merchant.
But the family always planned on a steam monkey.
Well, said the monkey merchant, just as the wind-up monkey gave way to the steam monkey, the steam monkey has given way to the gas and electric monkeys.
Is that like the grandfather clock being replaced by the grandchild clock? Sort of, said the monkey merchant.
So we bought the electric monkey, and plugged its umbilical cord into the wall.
The smoke coming out of its fur told us something was wrong.
We had electrocuted the family monkey.