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Best Famous Baptism Poems

Here is a collection of the all-time best famous Baptism poems. This is a select list of the best famous Baptism poetry. Reading, writing, and enjoying famous Baptism poetry (as well as classical and contemporary poems) is a great past time. These top poems are the best examples of baptism poems.

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by Ben Jonson | |

To Oldend Gatherer


LIII.
 — TO OLDEND GATHERER.
  

Long-gathering OLDEND, I did fear thee wise,
When having pill'd a book which no man buys,
Thou wert content the author's name to lose ;
But when, in place, thou didst the patron's choose,
It was as if thou printed hadst an oath,
To give the world assurance thou wert both ;
And that, as puritans at baptism do,
Thou art the father, and the witness too.
For, but thyself, where, out of motley, 's he
Could save that line to dedicate to thee ?


by Robert William Service | |

Tea On The Lawn

 It was foretold by sybils three
that in an air crash he would die.
"I'll fool their prophesy," said he; "You won't get me to go on high.
Howe're the need for haste and speed, I'll never, never, never fly.
" It's true he traveled everywhere, Afar and near, by land and sea, Yet he would never go by air And chance an evil destiny.
Always by ship or rail he went - For him no sky-plane accident.
Then one day walking on the heath He watched a pilot chap on high, And chuckled as he stood beneath That lad a-looping in the sky.
Feeling so safe and full of glee Serenely he went home to tea.
With buttered toast he told his wife: "My dear, you can't say I've been rash; Three fortune tellers said my life Would end up in an air-plane crash.
But see! I'm here so safe and sound: By gad! I'll never leave the ground.
"For me no baptism of air; It's in my bed I mean to die.
Behold yon crazy fool up there, A-cutting capers in the sky.
His motor makes a devilish din .
.
.
Look! Look! He's gone into a spin.
"He's dashing downward - "Oh my God!" .
.
.
Alas! he never finished tea.
The motor ploughed the garden sod And in the crash a corpse was he: Proving that no man can frustrate The merciless design of Fate.


by Derek Walcott | |

A Citys Death By Fire

 After that hot gospeller has levelled all but the churched sky,
I wrote the tale by tallow of a city's death by fire;
Under a candle's eye, that smoked in tears, I
Wanted to tell, in more than wax, of faiths that were snapped like wire.
All day I walked abroad among the rubbled tales, Shocked at each wall that stood on the street like a liar; Loud was the bird-rocked sky, and all the clouds were bales Torn open by looting, and white, in spite of the fire.
By the smoking sea, where Christ walked, I asked, why Should a man wax tears, when his wooden world fails? In town, leaves were paper, but the hills were a flock of faiths; To a boy who walked all day, each leaf was a green breath Rebuilding a love I thought was dead as nails, Blessing the death and the baptism by fire.


More great poems below...

by Isaac Watts | |

Hymn 121

 Children devoted to God.
[For those who practise infant Baptism.
] Gen.
17:7,10; Acts 16:14,15,33.
Thus saith the mercy of the Lord, "I'll be a God to thee; I'll bless thy num'rous race, and they Shall be a seed for me.
" Abram believed the promised grace, And gave his sons to God; But water seals the blessing now, That once was sealed with blood.
Thus Lydia sanctified her house, When she received the word; Thus the believing jailer gave His household to the Lord.
Thus later saints, eternal King! Thine ancient truth embrace; To thee their infant offspring bring, And humbly claim the grace.


by Isaac Watts | |

Hymn 122

 Believers buried with Christ in baptism.
Rom.
6:3,4,etc.
Do we not know that solemn word, That we are buried with the Lord, Baptized into his death, and then Put off the body of our sin? Our souls receive diviner breath, Raised from corruption, guilt, and death; So from the grave did Christ arise, And lives to God above the skies.
No more let sin or Satan reign Over our mortal flesh again; The various lusts we served before Shall have dominion now no more.


by Isaac Watts | |

Hymn 52

 Baptism.
Matt.
28:19; Acts 2:38.
'Twas the commission of our Lord, "Go teach the nations, and baptize:" The nations have received the word Since he ascended to the skies.
He sits upon th' eternal hills, With grace and pardon in his hands; And sends his cov'nant with the seals, To bless the distant British lands.
"Repent, and be baptized," he saith, For the remission of your sins:" And thus our sense assists our faith, And shows us what his gospel means.
Our souls he washes in his blood, As water makes the body clean; And the good Spirit from our God Descends like purifying rain.
Thus we engage ourselves to thee, And seal our cov'nant with the Lord; O may the great eternal Three In heav'n our solemn vows record!


by Edgar Lee Masters | |

Tennessee Claflin Shope

 I was the laughing-stock of the village,
Chiefly of the people of good sense, as they call themselves --
Also of the learned, like Rev.
Peet, who read Greek The same as English.
For instead of talking free trade, Or preaching some form of baptism; Instead of believing in the efficacy Of walking cracks -- picking up pins the right way, Seeing the new moon over the right shoulder, Or curing rheumatism with blue glass, I asserted the sovereignty of my own soul.
Before Mary Baker G.
Eddy even got started With what she called science I had mastered the "Bhagavad Gita," And cured my soul, before Mary Began to cure bodies with souls -- Peace to all worlds!


by Claude McKay | |

Baptism

 Into the furnace let me go alone;
Stay you without in terror of the heat.
I will go naked in--for thus ''tis sweet-- Into the weird depths of the hottest zone.
I will not quiver in the frailest bone, You will not note a flicker of defeat; My heart shall tremble not its fate to meet, My mouth give utterance to any moan.
The yawning oven spits forth fiery spears; Red aspish tongues shout wordlessly my name.
Desire destroys, consumes my mortal fears, Transforming me into a shape of flame.
I will come out, back to your world of tears, A stronger soul within a finer frame.


by George Herbert | |

H. Baptism II

 Since, Lord, to thee
A narrow way and little gate
Is all the passage, on my infancy
Thou didst lay hold, and antedate
My faith in me.
O let me still Write thee great God, and me a child: Let me be soft and supple to thy will, Small to my self, to others mild, Behither ill.
Although by stealth My flesh get on, yet let her sister My soul bid nothing, but preserve her wealth: The growth of flesh is but a blister; Childhood is health.


by George Herbert | |

H. Baptism

 As he that sees a dark and shady grove, 
Stays not, but looks beyond it on the sky; 
So when I view my sins, mine eyes remove
More backward still, and to that water fly, 
Which is above the heav'ns, whose spring and rest 
Is in my dear Redeemer's pierced side.
O blessed streams! either ye do prevent And stop our sins from growing thick and wide, Or else give tears to drown them, as they grow.
In you Redemption measures all my time, And spreads the plaster equal to the crime; You taught the book of life my name, that so What ever future sins should me miscall, Your first acquaintance might discredit all.


by Walt Whitman | |

France the 18th year of These States.

 1
A GREAT year and place; 
A harsh, discordant, natal scream out-sounding, to touch the mother’s heart closer
 than
 any yet.
I walk’d the shores of my Eastern Sea, Heard over the waves the little voice, Saw the divine infant, where she woke, mournfully wailing, amid the roar of cannon, curses, shouts, crash of falling buildings; Was not so sick from the blood in the gutters running—nor from the single corpses, nor those in heaps, nor those borne away in the tumbrils; Was not so desperate at the battues of death—was not so shock’d at the repeated fusillades of the guns.
2 Pale, silent, stern, what could I say to that long-accrued retribution? Could I wish humanity different? Could I wish the people made of wood and stone? Or that there be no justice in destiny or time? 3 O Liberty! O mate for me! Here too the blaze, the grape-shot and the axe, in reserve, to fetch them out in case of need; Here too, though long represt, can never be destroy’d; Here too could rise at last, murdering and extatic; Here too demanding full arrears of vengeance.
4 Hence I sign this salute over the sea, And I do not deny that terrible red birth and baptism, But remember the little voice that I heard wailing—and wait with perfect trust, no matter how long; And from to-day, sad and cogent, I maintain the bequeath’d cause, as for all lands, And I send these words to Paris with my love, And I guess some chansonniers there will understand them, For I guess there is latent music yet in France—floods of it; O I hear already the bustle of instruments—they will soon be drowning all that would interrupt them; O I think the east wind brings a triumphal and free march, It reaches hither—it swells me to joyful madness, I will run transpose it in words, to justify it, I will yet sing a song for you, MA FEMME.


by Julia Ward Howe | |

Mothers Day Proclamation

 Arise then.
.
.
women of this day! Arise, all women who have hearts! Whether your baptism be of water or of tears! Say firmly: "We will not have questions answered by irrelevant agencies, Our husbands will not come to us, reeking with carnage, For caresses and applause.
Our sons shall not be taken from us to unlearn All that we have been able to teach them of charity, mercy and patience.
We, the women of one country, Will be too tender of those of another country To allow our sons to be trained to injure theirs.
" From the voice of a devastated Earth a voice goes up with Our own.
It says: "Disarm! Disarm! The sword of murder is not the balance of justice.
" Blood does not wipe our dishonor, Nor violence indicate possession.
As men have often forsaken the plough and the anvil At the summons of war, Let women now leave all that may be left of home For a great and earnest day of counsel.
Let them meet first, as women, to bewail and commemorate the dead.
Let them solemnly take counsel with each other as to the means Whereby the great human family can live in peace.
.
.
Each bearing after his own time the sacred impress, not of Caesar, But of God - In the name of womanhood and humanity, I earnestly ask That a general congress of women without limit of nationality, May be appointed and held at someplace deemed most convenient And the earliest period consistent with its objects, To promote the alliance of the different nationalities, The amicable settlement of international questions, The great and general interests of peace.


by Robert Herrick | |

TO MUSIC TO BECALM HIS FEVER

 Charm me asleep, and melt me so
With thy delicious numbers;
That being ravish'd, hence I go
Away in easy slumbers.
Ease my sick head, And make my bed, Thou Power that canst sever From me this ill;-- And quickly still, Though thou not kill My fever.
Thou sweetly canst convert the same From a consuming fire, Into a gentle-licking flame, And make it thus expire.
Then make me weep My pains asleep, And give me such reposes, That I, poor I, May think, thereby, I live and die 'Mongst roses.
Fall on me like a silent dew, Or like those maiden showers, Which, by the peep of day, do strew A baptism o'er the flowers.
Melt, melt my pains With thy soft strains; That having ease me given, With full delight, I leave this light, And take my flight For Heaven.


by Elizabeth Barrett Browning | |

Sonnet 07 - The face of all the world is changed I think

 The face of all the world is changed, I think,
Since first I heard the footsteps of thy soul
Move still, oh, still, beside me, as they stole
Betwixt me and the dreadful outer brink
Of obvious death, where I, who thought to sink,
Was caught up into love, and taught the whole
Of life in a new rhythm.
The cup of dole God gave for baptism, I am fain to drink, And praise its sweetness, Sweet, with thee anear.
The names of country, heaven, are changed away For where thou art or shalt be, there or here; And this .
.
.
this lute and song .
.
.
loved yesterday, (The singing angels know) are only dear Because thy name moves right in what they say.