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Best Famous Allah Poems

Here is a collection of the all-time best famous Allah poems. This is a select list of the best famous Allah poetry. Reading, writing, and enjoying famous Allah poetry (as well as classical and contemporary poems) is a great past time. These top poems are the best examples of allah poems.

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by Allama Iqbal | |

Benevolence

On the bough of a tree was seated
A nightingale that was saddened

Saying that-
Over me the night is past
And in pecking day is lost!

Towards their nest
How will they (birds) reach
When the shadow of dark
Has fastened its glitch

When heard this yell and wail
Of the nightingale
Said the glowworm
In a voice so calm

With my heart and soul
To you I am of avail
So what if I am
An insect so little?

The night is dark
Why worry then?
All through your route
I will enlighten!

A torch has Allah given me
A radiant lamp has He made me

Noble are those ones indeed
Whom others find while in need!


by Tanwir Phool | |

Hamd

Tiri Qudrat ko yaa Rab ! zarray zarray sey a'yaaN dekhaa
Qamar maiN ,shams maiN ,anjum maiN Tujh ko zaufishaaN dekhaa

Who sheereeN Naam hai ALLAH kaa jo RaaHat-e-dil hai
Fanaa jo ho geya Us par, usay hi jaawidaaN dekhaa

Pukaaraa markaz-e-dil sey to paayaa paas hi Us ko
Usay hi BaKhshnay waalaa ,Usay hi MehrbaaN dekhaa

Sahaaraa be-basoN kaa hai , Who mazloomoN kaa Waali hai
Usi kay aastaanay ko panaah-e-be-kasaaN dekhaa

Samajh saktaa naheeN Israar Haq kay aa'dam-e-Khaaki
Na aiesaa falsafi dekhaa , na aiesaa nukta daaN dekhaa

Gulistaan-e-jahaaN maiN Phool ki faryaad Sun yaa Rab !
Tiraa hi Naam lay kar us ko maSroof-e-fuGhaaN dekhaa

(Poet : Tanwir Phool)

You can read more poetry of Tanwir Phool at these links :

http://urdunetjpn.
com/ur/category/tanwir-phool/ http://www.
urdubandhan.
com/bazm/viewtopic.
php?f=8&t=7438


by Emma Lazarus | |

The Taming of the Falcon

 The bird sits spelled upon the lithe brown wrist 
Of yonder turbaned fowler, who had lamed 
No feather limb, but the winged spirit tamed 
With his compelling eye.
He need not trust The silken coil, not set the thick-limed snare; He lures the wanderer with his steadfast gaze, It shrinks, it quails, it trembles yet obeys.
And, lo! he has enslaved the thing of air.
The fixed, insistent human will is lord Of all the earth;--but in the awful sky Reigns absolute, unreached by deed or word Above creation; through eternity, Outshining the sun's shield, the lightening's sword, The might of Allah's unaverted eye.


by Robert William Service | |

Rosy-Kins

 As home from church we two did plod,
"Grandpa," said Rosy, "What is God?"
Seeking an answer to her mind,
This is the best that I could find.
.
.
.
God is the Iz-ness of our Cosmic Biz; The high, the low, the near, the far, The atom and the evening star; The lark, the shark, the cloud, the clod, The whole darned Universe - that's God.
Some deem that others there be, And to them humbly bend the knee; To Mumbo Jumbo and to Joss, To Bud and Allah - but the Boss Is mine .
.
.
While there are suns and seas MY timeless God shall dwell in these.
In every glowing leaf He lives; When roses die His life he gives; God is not outside and apart From Nature, but her very heart; No Architect (as I of verse) He is Himself the Universe.
Said Rosy-kins: "Grandpa, how odd Is your imagining of God.
To me he's always just appeared A huge Grandfather with a beard.


by Anne Sexton | |

The Moss Of His Skin

 "Young girls in old Arabia were often buried alive next
to their fathers, apparently as sacrifice to the goddesses
of the tribes.
.
.
" --Harold Feldman, "Children of the Desert" Psychoanalysis and Psychoanalytic Review, Fall 1958 It was only important to smile and hold still, to lie down beside him and to rest awhile, to be folded up together as if we were silk, to sink from the eyes of mother and not to talk.
The black room took us like a cave or a mouth or an indoor belly.
I held my breath and daddy was there, his thumbs, his fat skull, his teeth, his hair growing like a field or a shawl.
I lay by the moss of his skin until it grew strange.
My sisters will never know that I fall out of myself and pretend that Allah will not see how I hold my daddy like an old stone tree.


by Rudyard Kipling | |

The Jester

 There are three degrees of bliss
At the foot of Allah's Throne
And the highest place is his
Who saves a brother's soul
At peril of his own.
There is the Power made known! There are three degrees of bliss In Garden of Paradise, And the second place is his Who saves his brother's soul By exellent advice.
For the Glory lies! There the are three degrees of bliss And three abodes of the Blest, And the lowest place is his Who had saved a soul by jest And a brother's soul in sport.
.
.
But there do the Angels resort!


by Rudyard Kipling | |

The Two-Sided Man

 Much I owe to the Lands that grew--
More to the Lives that fed--
But most to Allah Who gave me two
Separate sides to my head.
Much I reflect on the Good and the True In the Faiths beneath the sun, But most to Allah Who gave me two Sides to my head, not one.
Wesley's following, Calvin's flock, White or yellow or bronze, Shaman, Ju-ju or Angekok, Minister, Mukamuk, Bonze-- Here is a health, my brothers, to you, However your prayers are said, And praised be Allah Who gave me two Separate sides to my head! I would go without shirt or shoe, Friend, tobacco or bread, Sooner than lose for a minute the two Separate sides of my head!


by Eugene Field | |

Abu midjan

 When Father Time swings round his scythe,
Entomb me 'neath the bounteous vine,
So that its juices, red and blithe,
May cheer these thirsty bones of mine.
"Elsewise with tears and bated breath Should I survey the life to be.
But oh! How should I hail the death That brings that--vinous grace to me!" So sung the dauntless Saracen, Whereat the Prophet-Chief ordains That, curst of Allah, loathed of men, The faithless one shall die in chains.
But one vile Christian slave that lay A prisoner near that prisoner saith: "God willing, I will plant some day A vine where liest thou in death.
" Lo, over Abu Midjan's grave With purpling fruit a vine-tree grows; Where rots the martyred Christian slave Allah, and only Allah, knows!