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Best Famous James Joyce Poems

Here is a collection of the all-time best famous James Joyce poems. This is a select list of the best famous James Joyce poetry. Reading, writing, and enjoying famous James Joyce poetry (as well as classical and contemporary poems) is a great past time. These top poems are the best examples of James Joyce poems.

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by James Joyce | |

At That Hour

 At that hour when all things have repose, 
O lonely watcher of the skies, 
Do you hear the night wind and the sighs 
Of harps playing unto Love to unclose 
The pale gates of sunrise? 

When all things repose, do you alone 
Awake to hear the sweet harps play 
To Love before him on his way, 
And the night wind answering in antiphon 
Till night is overgone? 

Play on, invisible harps, unto Love, 
Whose way in heaven is aglow 
At that hour when soft lights come and go, 
Soft sweet music in the air above 
And in the earth below.


by James Joyce | |

Bahnhofstrasse

 The eyes that mock me sign the way
Whereto I pass at eve of day.
Grey way whose violet signals are The trysting and the twining star.
Ah star of evil! star of pain! Highhearted youth comes not again Nor old heart's wisdom yet to know The signs that mock me as I go.


by James Joyce | |

Be Not Sad

 Be not sad because all men 
Prefer a lying clamour before you: 
Sweetheart, be at peace again -- - 
Can they dishonour you? 

They are sadder than all tears; 
Their lives ascend as a continual sigh.
Proudly answer to their tears: As they deny, deny.


by James Joyce | |

O It Was Out by Donnycarney

 O, it was out by Donnycarney 
When the bat flew from tree to tree 
My love and I did walk together; 
And sweet were the words she said to me.
Along with us the summer wind Went murmuring -- - O, happily! -- - But softer than the breath of summer Was the kiss she gave to me.


by James Joyce | |

Of That So Sweet Imprisonment

 Of that so sweet imprisonment 
My soul, dearest, is fain -- - 
Soft arms that woo me to relent 
And woo me to detain.
Ah, could they ever hold me there Gladly were I a prisoner! Dearest, through interwoven arms By love made tremulous, That night allures me where alarms Nowise may trouble us; But lseep to dreamier sleep be wed Where soul with soul lies prisoned.


by James Joyce | |

Because Your Voice Was at My Side

 Because your voice was at my side 
I gave him pain, 
Because within my hand I held 
Your hand again.
There is no word nor any sign Can make amend -- - He is a stranger to me now Who was my friend.


by James Joyce | |

Bid Adieu to Maidenhood

 Bid adieu, adieu, adieu,
Bid adieu to girlish days,
Happy Love is come to woo
Thee and woo thy girlish ways—
The zone that doth become thee fair,
The snood upon thy yellow hair,

When thou hast heard his name upon
The bugles of the cherubim
Begin thou softly to unzone
Thy girlish bosom unto him
And softly to undo the snood
That is the sign of maidenhood.


by James Joyce | |

Bright Cap and Streamers

 Bright cap and streamers, 
He sings in the hollow: 
Come follow, come follow, 
All you that love.
Leave dreams to the dreamers That will not after, That song and laughter Do nothing move.
With ribbons streaming He sings the bolder; In troop at his shoulder The wild bees hum.
And the time of dreaming Dreams is over -- - As lover to lover, Sweetheart, I come.


by James Joyce | |

Dear Heart Why Will You Use Me So?

 Dear heart, why will you use me so? 
Dear eyes that gently me upbraid, 
Still are you beautiful -- - but O, 
How is your beauty raimented! 

Through the clear mirror of your eyes, 
Through the soft sigh of kiss to kiss, 
Desolate winds assail with cries 
The shadowy garden where love is.
And soon shall love dissolved be When over us the wild winds blow -- - But you, dear love, too dear to me, Alas! why will you use me so?


by James Joyce | |

He Who Hath Glory Lost

 He who hath glory lost, nor hath 
Found any soul to fellow his, 
Among his foes in scorn and wrath 
Holding to ancient nobleness, 
That high unconsortable one --- 
His love is his companion.


by James Joyce | |

My Love Is in a Light Attire

 My love is in a light attire 
Among the apple-trees, 
Where the gay winds do most desire 
To run in companies.
There, where the gay winds stay to woo The young leaves as they pass, My love goes slowly, bending to Her shadow on the grass; And where the sky's a pale blue cup Over the laughing land, My love goes lightly, holding up Her dress with dainty hand.


by James Joyce | |

Nightpiece

 Gaunt in gloom,
The pale stars their torches,
Enshrouded, wave.
Ghostfires from heaven's far verges faint illume, Arches on soaring arches, Night's sindark nave.
Seraphim, The lost hosts awaken To service till In moonless gloom each lapses muted, dim, Raised when she has and shaken Her thurible.
And long and loud, To night's nave upsoaring, A starknell tolls As the bleak incense surges, cloud on cloud, Voidward from the adoring Waste of souls.


by James Joyce | |

Ecce Puer

 Of the dark past
A child is born;
With joy and grief
My heart is torn.
Calm in his cradle The living lies.
May love and mercy Unclose his eyes! Young life is breathed On the glass; The world that was not Comes to pass.
A child is sleeping: An old man gone.
O, father forsaken, Forgive your son!


by James Joyce | |

Flood

 Goldbrown upon the sated flood
The rockvine clusters lift and sway;
Vast wings above the lambent waters brood
Of sullen day.
A waste of waters ruthlessly Sways and uplifts its weedy mane Where brooding day stares down upon the sea In dull disdain.
Uplift and sway, O golden vine, Your clustered fruits to love's full flood, Lambent and vast and ruthless as is thine Incertitude!


by James Joyce | |

From Dewy Dreams

 From dewy dreams, my soul, arise, 
From love's deep slumber and from death, 
For lo! the treees are full of sighs 
Whose leaves the morn admonisheth.
Eastward the gradual dawn prevails Where softly-burning fires appear, Making to tremble all those veils Of grey and golden gossamer.
While sweetly, gently, secretly, The flowery bells of morn are stirred And the wise choirs of faery Begin (innumerous!) to be heard.


by James Joyce | |

Gentle Lady Do Not Sing

 Gentle lady, do not sing 
Sad songs about the end of love; 
Lay aside sadness and sing 
How love that passes is enough.
Sing about the long deep sleep Of lovers that are dead, and how In the grave all love shall sleep: Love is aweary now.


by James Joyce | |

I Would in That Sweet Bosom Be

 I would in that sweet bosom be 
(O sweet it is and fair it is!) 
Where no rude wind might visit me.
Because of sad austerities I would in that sweet bosom be.
I would be ever in that heart (O soft I knock and soft entreat her!) Where only peace might be my part.
Austerities were all the sweeter So I were ever in that heart.


by James Joyce | |

In the Dark Pine-Wood

 In the dark pine-wood 
I would we lay, 
In deep cool shadow 
At noon of day.
How sweet to lie there, Sweet to kiss, Where the great pine-forest Enaisled is! Thy kiss descending Sweeter were With a soft tumult Of thy hair.
O unto the pine-wood At noon of day Come with me now, Sweet love, away.


by James Joyce | |

Lean Out of the Window

 Lean out of the window, 
Goldenhair, 
I hear you singing 
A merry air.
My book was closed, I read no more, Watching the fire dance On the floor.
I have left my book, I have left my room, For I heard you singing Through the gloom.
Singing and singing A merry air, Lean out of the window, Goldenhair.


by James Joyce | |

Lightly Come or Lightly Go

 Lightly come or lightly go: 
Though thy heart presage thee woe, 
Vales and many a wasted sun, 
Oread let thy laughter run, 
Till the irreverent mountain air 
Ripple all thy flying hair.
Lightly, lightly -- - ever so: Clouds that wrap the vales below At the hour of evenstar Lowliest attendants are; Love and laughter song-confessed When the heart is heaviest.