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Best Famous Ezra Pound Poems


Here is a collection of the all-time best famous Ezra Pound poems. This is a select list of the best famous Ezra Pound poetry. Reading, writing, and enjoying famous Ezra Pound poetry (as well as classical and contemporary poems) is a great past time. These top poems are the best examples of Ezra Pound poems.

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by Ezra Pound |

Salutation

 In one salutation to thee, my God, 
let all my senses spread out and touch this world at thy feet. 

Like a rain-cloud of July 
hung low with its burden of unshed showers 
let all my mind bend down at thy door in one salutation to thee. 

Let all my songs gather together their diverse strains into a single current 
and flow to a sea of silence in one salutation to thee. 

Like a flock of homesick cranes flying night and day 
back to their mountain nests 
let all my life take its voyage to its eternal home 
in one salutation to thee.


by Ezra Pound |

Before Sleep

 I was in love with anatomy
the symmetry of my body
poised for flight,
the heights it would take
over parents, lovers, a keen
riding over truth and detail.
I thought growing up would be
this rising from everything
old and earthly,
not these faltering steps out the door
every day, then back again.


by Ezra Pound |

Song in the Manner of Housman

 O woe, woe, 
People are born and die, 
We also shall be dead pretty soon 
Therefore let us act as if we were 
dead already.

The bird sits on the hawthorn tree 
But he dies also, presently. 
Some lads get hung, and some get shot. 
Woeful is this human lot. 
Woe! woe, etcetera . . . .

London is a woeful place, 
Shropshire is much pleasanter. 
Then let us smile a little space 
Upon fond nature's morbid grace. 
Oh, Woe, woe, woe, etcetera . . .


by Ezra Pound |

The Fault of It

 Some may have blamed us that we cease to speak
Of things we spoke of in our verses early,
Saying: a lovely voice is such as such;
Saying: that lady's eyes were sad last week,
Wherein the world's whole joy is born and dies;
Saying: she hath this way or that, this much
Of grace, this way or that, this much
Of grace, this little misericorde;
Ask us no further word;
If we were proud, then proud to be so wise
Ask us no more of all the things ye heard;
We may not speak of them, they touch us nearly.


by Ezra Pound |

Notes for Canto CXX

 I have tried to write Paradise

Do not move
Let the wind speak
that is paradise.

Let the Gods forgive what I
have made
Let those I love try to forgive
what I have made.


by Ezra Pound |

Before Sleep

 The lateral vibrations caress me, 
They leap and caress me, 
They work pathetically in my favour, 
They seek my financial good. 

She of the spear stands present. 
The gods of the underworld attend me, O Annubis, 
These are they of thy company. 
With a pathetic solicitude they attend me; 
Undulant, 
Their realm is the lateral courses. 


Light! 
I am up to follow thee, Pallas. 
Up and out of their caresses. 
You were gone up as a rocket, 
Bending your passages from right to left and from left to right 
In the flat projection of a spiral. 
The gods of drugged sleep attend me, 
Wishing me well; 
I am up to follow thee, Pallas.


by Allen Ginsberg |

War Profit Litany

 To Ezra Pound

These are the names of the companies that have made
 money from this war
nineteenhundredsixtyeight Annodomini fourthousand
 eighty Hebraic
These are the Corporations who have profited by merchan-
 dising skinburning phosphorous or shells fragmented
 to thousands of fleshpiercing needles
and here listed money millions gained by each combine for
 manufacture
and here are gains numbered, index'd swelling a decade, set
 in order,
here named the Fathers in office in these industries, tele-
 phones directing finance,
names of directors, makers of fates, and the names of the 
 stockholders of these destined Aggregates,
and here are the names of their ambassadors to the Capital,
 representatives to legislature, those who sit drinking
 in hotel lobbies to persuade,
and separate listed, those who drop Amphetamine with
 military, gossip, argue, and persuade
suggesting policy naming language proposing strategy, this
 done for fee as ambassadors to Pentagon, consul-
 tants to military, paid by their industry:
and these are the names of the generals & captains mili-
 tary, who know thus work for war goods manufactur-
 ers;
and above these, listed, the names of the banks, combines,
 investment trusts that control these industries:
and these are the names of the newspapers owned by these
 banks
and these are the names of the airstations owned by these
 combines;
and these are the numbers of thousands of citizens em-
 ployed by these businesses named;
and the beginning of this accounting is 1958 and the end
 1968, that static be contained in orderly mind,
 coherent and definite,
and the first form of this litany begun first day December
 1967 furthers this poem of these States.

 December 1, 1967


by Amy Lowell |

Astigmatism

 To Ezra Pound;With 
much friendship and admiration and some differences of opinion


by Ezra Pound |

A Virginal

 No, no! Go from me. I have left her lately. 
I will not spoil my sheath with lesser brightness, 
For my surrounding air hath a new lightness; 
Slight are her arms, yet they have bound me straitly 
And left me cloaked as with a gauze of æther; 
As with sweet leaves; as with subtle clearness. 
Oh, I have picked up magic in her nearness 
To sheathe me half in half the things that sheathe her. 
No, no! Go from me. I have still the flavour, 
Soft as spring wind that's come from birchen bowers. 
Green come the shoots, aye April in the branches, 
As winter's wound with her sleight hand she staunches, 
Hath of the trees a likeness of the savour: 
As white as their bark, so white this lady's hours.


by Ezra Pound |

The Plunge

 I would bathe myself in strangeness:
These comforts heaped upon me, smother me!
I burn, I scald so for the new,
New friends, new faces,
Places!
Oh to be out of this,
This that is all I wanted
- save the new.

And you,
Love, you the much, the more desired!
Do I not loathe all walls, streets, stones,
All mire, mist, all fog,
All ways of traffic?
You, I wold have flow over me like water,
Oh, but far out of this!
Grass, and low fields, and hills, 
And sun,
Oh, sun enough!
Out, and alone, among some
Alien people!