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Best Famous Edward Lear Poems

Here is a collection of the all-time best famous Edward Lear poems. This is a select list of the best famous Edward Lear poetry. Reading, writing, and enjoying famous Edward Lear poetry (as well as classical and contemporary poems) is a great past time. These top poems are the best examples of Edward Lear poems.

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Written by Edward Lear |

The Owl and the Pussy-Cat

The Owl and the Pussy-Cat went to sea
  In a beautiful pea-green boat,
They took some honey, and plenty of money
  Wrapped up in a five-pound note.
The Owl looked up to the stars above, And sang to a small guitar, "O lovely Pussy, O Pussy, my love, What a beautiful Pussy you are, You are, You are! What a beautiful Pussy you are!" Pussy said to the Owl, "You elegant fowl! How charmingly sweet you sing! O let us be married! too long we have tarried: But what shall we do for a ring?" They sailed away, for a year and a day, To the land where the Bong-tree grows And there in a wood a Piggy-wig stood With a ring at the end of his nose, His nose, His nose, With a ring at the end of his nose.
"Dear Pig, are you willing to sell for one shilling Your ring?" Said the Piggy, "I will.
" So they took it away, and were married next day By the Turkey who lives on the hill.
They dined on mince, and slices of quince, Which they ate with a runcible spoon; And hand in hand, on the edge of the sand, They danced by the light of the moon, The moon, The moon, They danced by the light of the moon.

Written by Edward Lear |

There was an old person of Fife

There was an old person of Fife,
Who was greatly disgusted with life;
They sang him a ballad, and fed him on salad,
Which cured that old person of Fife.

Written by Edward Lear |

There Was an Old Man in a Tree

 There was an Old Man in a tree,
Who was horribly bored by a bee.
When they said "Does it buzz?" He replied "Yes, it does! It's a regular brute of a bee!"

Written by Edward Lear |

C was a cat

C

was a cat
Who ran after a rat;
But his courage did fail
When she seized on his tail.

c

Crafty old cat!


Written by Edward Lear |

The Jumblies

They went to sea in a Sieve, they did,
  In a Sieve they went to sea:
In spite of all their friends could say,
On a winter's morn, on a stormy day,
  In a Sieve they went to sea!
And when the Sieve turned round and round,
And every one cried, `You'll all be drowned!'
They called aloud, `Our Sieve ain't big,
But we don't care a button! we don't care a fig!
  In a Sieve we'll go to sea!'
    Far and few, far and few,
      Are the lands where the Jumblies live;
    Their heads are green, and their hands are blue,
      And they went to sea in a Sieve.
They sailed away in a Sieve, they did, In a Sieve they sailed so fast, With only a beautiful pea-green veil Tied with a riband by way of a sail, To a small tobacco-pipe mast; And every one said, who saw them go, `O won't they be soon upset, you know! For the sky is dark, and the voyage is long, And happen what may, it's extremely wrong In a Sieve to sail so fast!' Far and few, far and few, Are the lands where the Jumblies live; Their heads are green, and their hands are blue, And they went to sea in a Sieve.
The water it soon came in, it did, The water it soon came in; So to keep them dry, they wrapped their feet In a pinky paper all folded neat, And they fastened it down with a pin.
And they passed the night in a crockery-jar, And each of them said, `How wise we are! Though the sky be dark, and the voyage be long, Yet we never can think we were rash or wrong, While round in our Sieve we spin!' Far and few, far and few, Are the lands where the Jumblies live; Their heads are green, and their hands are blue, And they went to sea in a Sieve.
And all night long they sailed away; And when the sun went down, They whistled and warbled a moony song To the echoing sound of a coppery gong, In the shade of the mountains brown.
`O Timballo! How happy we are, When we live in a Sieve and a crockery-jar, And all night long in the moonlight pale, We sail away with a pea-green sail, In the shade of the mountains brown!' Far and few, far and few, Are the lands where the Jumblies live; Their heads are green, and their hands are blue, And they went to sea in a Sieve.
They sailed to the Western Sea, they did, To a land all covered with trees, And they bought an Owl, and a useful Cart, And a pound of Rice, and a Cranberry Tart, And a hive of silvery Bees.
And they bought a Pig, and some green Jack-daws, And a lovely Monkey with lollipop paws, And forty bottles of Ring-Bo-Ree, And no end of Stilton Cheese.
Far and few, far and few, Are the lands where the Jumblies live; Their heads are green, and their hands are blue, And they went to sea in a Sieve.
And in twenty years they all came back, In twenty years or more, And every one said, `How tall they've grown! For they've been to the Lakes, and the Torrible Zone, And the hills of the Chankly Bore!' And they drank their health, and gave them a feast Of dumplings made of beautiful yeast; And every one said, `If we only live, We too will go to sea in a Sieve,--- To the hills of the Chankly Bore!' Far and few, far and few, Are the lands where the Jumblies live; Their heads are green, and their hands are blue, And they went to sea in a Sieve.

Written by Edward Lear |

E was an elephant

E

was an elephant,
Stately and wise:
He had tusks and a trunk,
And two queer little eyes.

e

Oh, what funny small eyes!


Written by Edward Lear |

C was Papas gray Cat

C

was Papa's gray Cat,
Who caught a squeaky Mouse; She pulled him by his twirly tail
All about the house.


Written by Edward Lear |

There Was an Old Man with a Beard

 There was an Old Man with a beard,
Who said, "It is just as I feared! --
Two Owls and a Hen, four Larks and a Wren,
Have all built their nests in my beard.

Written by Edward Lear |

R was a rabbit

R

was a rabbit,
Who had a bad habit
Of eating the flowers
In gardens and bowers.

r

Naughty fat rabbit!


Written by Edward Lear |

A was an ape

A

was an ape,
Who stole some white tape,
And tied up his toes
In four beautiful bows.

a!

Funny old Ape!


Written by Edward Lear |

There was an Old Man of New York

 THERE WAS AN OLD MAN OF NEW YORK, WHO MURDERED HIMSELF WITH A FORK; 
BUT NOBODY CRIED THOUGH HE VERY SOON DIED, --
FOR THAT SILLY OLD MAN OF NEW YORK.

Written by Edward Lear |

There was a Young Lady Whose Eyes

 There was a young lady whose eyes,
were unique as to colour and size;
When she opened them wide,
people all turned aside,
and started away in surprise.

Written by Edward Lear |

There was a young lady in blue

There was a young lady in blue,
Who said, "Is it you? Is it you?"
When they said, "Yes, it is," she replied only, "Whizz!"
That ungracious young lady in blue.

Written by Edward Lear |

The Two Old Bachelors

 Two old Bachelors were living in one house;
One caught a Muffin, the other caught a Mouse.
Said he who caught the Muffin to him who caught the Mouse, - "This happens just in time! For we've nothing in the house, "Save a tiny slice of lemon and a teaspoonful of honey, "And what to do for dinner - since we haven't any money? "And what can we expect if we haven't any dinner, "But to lose our teeth and eyelashes and keep on growing thinner?" Said he who caught the Mouse to him who caught the Muffin, - "We might cook this little Mouse, if we only had some Stuffin'! "If we had but Sage and Onion we could do extremely well, "But how to get that Stuffin' it is difficult to tell!" - Those two old Bachelors ran quickly to the town And asked for Sage and Onions as they wandered up and down; They borrowed two large Onions, but no Sage was to be found In the Shops, or in the Market, or in all the Gardens round.
But some one said, - "A hill there is, a little to the north, "And to its purpledicular top a narrow way leads forth; - "And there among the rugged rocks abides an ancient Sage, - "An earnest Man, who reads all day a most perplexing page.
"Climb up, and seize him by the toes!-all studious as he sits, - "And pull him down, - and chop him into endless little bits! "Then mix him with your Onion, (cut up likewise into Scraps,) - "When your Stuffin' will be ready-and very good: perhaps.
" Those two old Bachelors without loss of time The nearly purpledicular crags at once began to climb; And at the top, among the rocks, all seated in a nook, They saw that Sage, a reading of a most enormous book.
"You earnest Sage!" aloud they cried, "your book you've read enough in!- "We wish to chop you into bits to mix you into Stuffin'!"- But that old Sage looked calmly up, and with his awful book, At those two Bachelors' bald heads a certain aim he took;- And over Crag and precipice they rolled promiscuous down,- At once they rolled, and never stopped in lane or field or town,- And when they reached their house, they found (besides their want of Stuffin',) The Mouse had fled; - and, previously, had eaten up the Muffin.
They left their home in silence by the once convivial door.
And from that hour those Bachelors were never heard of more.

Written by Edward Lear |

There was an Old Person whose habits

There was an Old Person whose habits
Induced him to feed upon Rabbits;
When he'd eaten eighteen, he turned perfectly green,
Upon which he relinquished those habits.