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by Anne Kingsmill Finch | |

Adam Posed

Could our first father, at his toilsome plow,
Thorns in his path, and labor on his brow,
Clothed only in a rude, unpolished skin,
Could he a vain fantastic nymph have seen,
In all her airs, in all her antic graces,
Her various fashions, and more various faces;
How had it posed that skill, which late assigned
Just appellations to each several kind!
A right idea of the sight to frame;
T'have guessed from what new element she came;
T'have hit the wav'ring form, or giv'n this thing a name.


by Anne Kingsmill Finch | |

HOPE

 Do you believe, in what you see
do you believe in reality
do you believe in the sun that’s bright
do you believe in the stars in the night

Do you believe in the birds that fly
do you believe in clouds and the sky
do you believe in wind that flows
do you believe in moon that glows
do you believe in light

Do you believe the spoken word
do you believe the things you’ve heard
do you believe in the final answer
do you believe in the swirling dancer


Do you believe in sound and sight
do you believe in moments bright
do you believe in taste and touch
do you believe that much

Do you believe in the soul inside
do you believe in ecstasy and delight
do you believe in glory and god
do you believe in that thought

Do you believe in the sky above
do you believe in love 

Do you believe in the heaven and the earth 
do you believe in death and birth
do you believe in life

open your eyes with hope within
open the door, let light reach in
if you believe, then you'll win


by Anne Kingsmill Finch | |

Three Songs

 Come unto these yellow sands,
And then take hands:
Court'sied when you have, and kiss'd,--
The wild waves whist--
Foot it featly here and there;
And, sweet sprites, the burthen bear.
Hark, hark! Bow, wow, The watch-dogs bark: Bow, wow.
Hark, hark! I hear The strain of strutting chanticleer Cry, Cock-a-diddle-dow! --from The Tempest Tell me where is Fancy bred, Or in the heart or in the head? How begot, how nourishèd? Reply, reply.
It is engender'd in the eyes; With gazing fed; and Fancy dies In the cradle where it lies.
Let us all ring Fancy's knell: I'll begin it,--Ding, dong, bell! All.
Ding, dong, bell! --from The Merchant of Venice Where the bee sucks, there suck I: In a cowslip's bell I lie; There I couch when owls do cry.
On the bat's back I do fly After summer merrily: Merrily, merrily, shall I live now, Under the blossom that hangs on the bough.
-from The Tempest


by Anne Kingsmill Finch | |

The Tree

 I stood still and was a tree amid the wood,
Knowing the truth of things unseen before;
Of Daphne and the laurel bow
And that god-feasting couple old
that grew elm-oak amid the wold.
'Twas not until the gods had been Kindly entreated, and been brought within Unto the hearth of their heart's home That they might do this wonder thing; Nathless I have been a tree amid the wood And many a new thing understood That was rank folly to my head before.


by Anne Kingsmill Finch | |

TO DEATH

 Thou bidst me come away,
And I'll no longer stay,
Than for to shed some tears
For faults of former years;
And to repent some crimes
Done in the present times;
And next, to take a bit
Of bread, and wine with it;
To don my robes of love,
Fit for the place above;
To gird my loins about
With charity throughout;
And so to travel hence
With feet of innocence;
These done, I'll only cry,
'God, mercy!' and so die.


by Anne Kingsmill Finch | |

Hope

 The Tree of Knowledge we in Eden prov'd; 
The Tree of Life was thence to Heav'n remov'd: 
Hope is the growth of Earth, the only Plant, 
Which either Heav'n, or Paradise cou'd want.
Hell knows it not, to Us alone confin'd, And Cordial only to the Human Mind.
Receive it then, t'expel these mortal Cares, Nor wave a Med'cine, which thy God prepares.


by Anne Kingsmill Finch | |

Friendship Between Ephelia And Ardelia

 Eph.
What Friendship is, ARDELIA shew.
Ard.
'Tis to love, as I love You.
Eph.
This Account, so short (tho' kind) Suits not my enquiring Mind.
Therefore farther now repeat; What is Friendship when complete? Ard.
'Tis to share all Joy and Grief; 'Tis to lend all due Relief From the Tongue, the Heart, the Hand; 'Tis to mortgage House and Land; For a Friend be sold a Slave; 'Tis to die upon a Grave, If a Friend therein do lie.
Eph.
This indeed, tho' carry'd high, This, tho' more than e'er was done Underneath the rolling Sun, This has all been said before.
Can ARDELIA say no more? Ard.
Words indeed no more can shew: But 'tis to love, as I love you.


by Anne Kingsmill Finch | |

Adam Posd

 Cou'd our First Father, at his toilsome Plough,
Thorns in his Path, and Labour on his Brow,
Cloath'd only in a rude, unpolish'd Skin,
Cou'd he a vain Fantastick Nymph have seen,
In all her Airs, in all her antick Graces, 
Her various Fashions, and more various Faces;
How had it pos'd that Skill, which late assign'd
Just Appellations to Each several Kind!
A right Idea of the Sight to frame;
T'have guest from what New Element she came; 
T'have hit the wav'ring Form, or giv'n this Thing a Name.


by Anne Kingsmill Finch | |

On Myselfe

 Good Heav'n, I thank thee, since it was design'd
I shou'd be fram'd, but of the weaker kinde,
That yet, my Soul, is rescu'd from the Love
Of all those Trifles, which their Passions move.
Pleasures, and Praise, and Plenty haue with me But their just value.
If allow'd they be, Freely, and thankfully as much I tast, As will not reason, or Religion wast.
If they're deny'd, I on my selfe can Liue, And slight those aids, unequal chance does give.
When in the Sun, my wings can be display'd, And in retirement, I can bless the shade.


by Anne Kingsmill Finch | |

Fragment at Tunbridge-Wells

 FOR He, that made, must new create us,
Ere Seneca, or Epictetus, 
With all their serious Admonitions,
Can, for the Spleen, prove good Physicians.
The Heart's unruly Palpitation Will not be laid by a Quotation; Nor will the Spirits move the lighter For the most celebrated Writer.
Sweats, Swoonings, and convulsive Motions Will not be cur'd by Words, and Notions.
Then live, old Brown! with thy Chalybeats, Which keep us from becoming Idiots.
At Tunbridge let us still be Drinking, Though 'tis the Antipodes to Thinking: Such Hurry, whilst the Spirit's flying, Such Stupefaction, when 'tis dying; Yet these, and not sententious Papers, Must brighten Life, and cure the Vapours


by Anne Kingsmill Finch | |

Jealousy

 VAIN Love, why do'st thou boast of Wings, 
That cannot help thee to retire! 
When such quick Flames Suspicion brings, 
As do the Heart about thee fire.
Still Swift to come, but when to go Thou shou'd'st be more–Alas! how Slow.
Lord of the World must surely be But thy bare Title at the most; Since Jealousy is Lord of Thee, And makes such Havock on thy Coast, As do's thy pleasant Land deface, Yet binds thee faster to the Place.


by Anne Kingsmill Finch | |

La Passion Vaincue

 On the Banks of the Severn a desperate Maid 
(Whom some Shepherd, neglecting his Vows, had betray'd,) 
Stood resolving to banish all Sense of the Pain, 
And pursue, thro' her Death, a Revenge on the Swain.
Since the Gods, and my Passion, at once he defies; Since his Vanity lives, whilst my Character dies; No more (did she say) will I trifle with Fate, But commit to the Waves both my Love and my Hate.
And now to comply with that furious Desire, Just ready to plunge, and alone to expire, Some Reflection on Death, and its Terrors untry'd, Some Scorn for the Shepherd, some Flashings of Pride At length pull'd her back, and she cry'd, Why this Strife, Since the Swains are so Many, and I've but One Life?


by Anne Kingsmill Finch | |

Moral Song

 Would we attain the happiest State, 
That is design'd us here; 
No Joy a Rapture must create, 
No Grief beget Despair.
No Injury fierce Anger raise, No Honour tempt to Pride; No vain Desires of empty Praise Must in the Soul abide.
No Charms of Youth, or Beauty move The constant, settl'd Breast: Who leaves a Passage free to Love, Shall let in, all the rest.
In such a Heart soft Peace will live, Where none of these abound; The greatest Blessing, Heav'n do's give, Or can on Earth be found.


by Anne Kingsmill Finch | |

The Appology

 'Tis true I write and tell me by what Rule
I am alone forbid to play the fool
To follow through the Groves a wand'ring Muse
And fain'd Idea's for my pleasures chuse
Why shou'd it in my Pen be held a fault 
Whilst Mira paints her face, to paint a thought
Whilst Lamia to the manly Bumper flys
And borrow'd Spiritts sparkle in her Eyes
Why shou'd itt be in me a thing so vain
To heat with Poetry my colder Brain?
But I write ill and there-fore shou'd forbear
Does Flavia cease now at her fortieth year
In ev'ry Place to lett that face be seen
Which all the Town rejected at fifteen
Each Woman has her weaknesse; mind [sic] indeed
Is still to write tho' hopelesse to succeed
Nor to the Men is this so easy found
Ev'n in most Works with which the Witts abound
(So weak are all since our first breach with Heav'n)
Ther's lesse to be Applauded than forgiven.


by Anne Kingsmill Finch | |

The Bird and the Arras

 By neer resemblance see that Bird betray'd
Who takes the well wrought Arras for a shade
There hopes to pearch and with a chearfull Tune
O're-passe the scortchings of the sultry Noon.
But soon repuls'd by the obdurate scean How swift she turns but turns alas in vain That piece a Grove, this shews an ambient sky Where immitated Fowl their pinnions ply Seeming to mount in flight and aiming still more high.
All she outstrip's and with a moments pride Their understation silent does deride Till the dash'd Cealing strikes her to the ground No intercepting shrub to break the fall is found Recovering breath the window next she gaines Nor fears a stop from the transparent Panes.
But we degresse and leaue th' imprison'd wretch Now sinking low now on a loftyer stretch Flutt'ring in endless cercles of dismay Till some kind hand directs the certain way Which through the casement an escape affoards And leads to ample space the only Heav'n of Birds.


by Anne Kingsmill Finch | |

The Equipage

 Since the Road of Life's so ill; 
I, to pass it, use this Skill, 
My frail Carriage driving home 
To its latest Stage, the Tomb.
Justice first, in Harness strong, Marches stedfastly along: Charity, to smooth the Pace, Fills the next adjoining Trace: Independance leads the Way, Whom no heavy Curb do's sway; Truth an equal Part sustains, All indulg'd the loosen'd Reins: In the Box fits vig'rous Health, Shunning miry Paths of Wealth: Gaiety with easy Smiles, Ev'ry harsher Step beguiles; Whilst of Nature, or of Fate Only This I wou'd intreat: The Equipage might not decay, Till the worn Carriage drops away.


by Anne Kingsmill Finch | |

The House of Socrates

 FOR Socrates a House was built, 
Of but inferiour Size; 
Not highly Arch'd, nor Carv'd, nor Gilt; 
The Man, 'tis said, was Wise.
But Mob despis'd the little Cell, That struck them with no Fear; Whilst Others thought, there should not dwell So great a Person there.
How shou'd a due Recourse be made To One, so much Admir'd? Where shou'd the spacious Cloth be laid, Or where the Guests retir'd? Believe me, quoth the list'ning Sage, 'Twas not to save the Charge; That in this over-building Age, My House was not more large.
But this for faithful Friends, and kind, Was only meant by me; Who fear that what too streight you find, Must yet contracted be.


by Anne Kingsmill Finch | |

The Marriage of Edward Herbert Esquire and Mrs. Elizabeth Herbert

 CUPID one day ask'd his Mother, 
When she meant that he shou'd Wed? 
You're too Young, my Boy, she said: 
Nor has Nature made another 
Fit to match with Cupid's Bed.
Cupid then her Sight directed To a lately Wedded Pair; Where Himself the Match effected; They as Youthful, they as Fair.
Having by Example carry'd This first Point in the Dispute; WORSELEY next he said's not Marry'd: Her's with Cupid's Charms may suit


by Anne Kingsmill Finch | |

The Phoenix

 A Female Friend advis'd a Swain 
(Whose Heart she wish'd at ease) 
Make Love thy Pleasure, not thy Pain, 
Nor let it deeply seize.
Beauty, where Vanities abound, No serious Passion claims; Then, 'till a Phoenix can be found, Do not admit the Flames.
But griev'd She finds, that his Replies (Since prepossess'd when Young) Take all their Hints from Silvia's Eyes, None from ARDELIA's Tongue.
Thus, Cupid, of our Aim we miss, Who wou'd unbend thy Bow; And each slight Nymph a Phoenix is, When Love will have it so.


by Anne Kingsmill Finch | |

The Unequal Fetters

 Cou'd we stop the time that's flying
Or recall itt when 'tis past
Put far off the day of Dying
Or make Youth for ever last
To Love wou'd then be worth our cost.
But since we must loose those Graces Which at first your hearts have wonne And you seek for in new Faces When our Spring of Life is done It wou'd but urdge our ruine on Free as Nature's first intention Was to make us, I'll be found Nor by subtle Man's invention Yeild to be in Fetters bound By one that walks a freer round.
Mariage does but slightly tye Men Whil'st close Pris'ners we remain They the larger Slaves of Hymen Still are begging Love again At the full length of all their chain.