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Best Famous Andrew Marvell Poems

Here is a collection of the all-time best famous Andrew Marvell poems. This is a select list of the best famous Andrew Marvell poetry. Reading, writing, and enjoying famous Andrew Marvell poetry (as well as classical and contemporary poems) is a great past time. These top poems are the best examples of Andrew Marvell poems.

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by Andrew Marvell | |

Ametas And Thestylis Making Hay-Ropes

 Ametas
Think'st Thou that this Love can stand,
Whilst Thou still dost say me nay?
Love unpaid does soon disband:
Love binds Love as Hay binds Hay.
Thestylis Think'st Thou that this Rope would twine If we both should turn one way? Where both parties so combine, Neither Love will twist nor Hay.
Ametas Thus you vain Excuses find, Which your selve and us delay: And Love tyes a Womans Mind Looser then with Ropes of Hay.
Thestylis What you cannot constant hope Must be taken as you may.
Ametas Then let's both lay by our Rope, And go kiss within the Hay.


by Andrew Marvell | |

In Effigiem Oliveri Cromwell

 Haec est quae toties Inimicos Umbra fugavit,
At sub qua Cives Otia lenta terunt.
In eandem Reginae Sueciae transmissam Bellipotens Virgo, septem Regina Trionum.
Christina, Arctoi lucida stella Poli; Cernis quas merui dura sub Casside Rugas; Sicque Senex Armis impiger Ora fero; Invia Fatorum dum per Vestigia nitor, Exequor & Populi fortia Jussa Manu.
At tibi submittit frontem reverentior Umbra, Nec sunt hi Vultus Regibus usque truces.


by Andrew Marvell | |

Senec. Traged. Ex Thyeste Chor.2

 Translated.
Senec.
Traged.
ex Thyeste Chor.
2.
Stet quicunque volet potens Aulae culmine lubrico &c.
Climb at Court for me that will Tottering favors Pinacle; All I seek is to lye still.
Settled in some secret Nest In calm Leisure let me rest; And far of the publick Stage Pass away my silent Age.
Thus when without noise, unknown, I have liv'd out all my span, I shall dye, without a groan, An old honest Country man.
Who expos'd to others Ey's, Into his own Heart ne'r pry's, Death to him's a Strange surprise


by Andrew Marvell | |

Upon An Eunuch; A Poet. Fragment

 Nec sterilem te crede; Licet, mulieribus exul,
Falcem virginiae nequeas immitere messi,
Et nostro peccare modo.
Tibi Fama perenne Praegnabit; rapiesque novem de monse Sorores; Et pariet modulos Echo repetita Nepotes.


by Andrew Marvell | |

Dignissimo Suo Amico Doctori Wittie. De Translatione Vulgi

 Nempe sic innumero succrescunt agmine libri,
Saepia vix toto ut jam natet una mari.
Fortius assidui surgunt a vulnere praeli: Quoque magis pressa est, auctior Hydra redit.
Heu quibus Anticyris, quibus est sanabilis herbis Improba scribendi pestis, avarus amor! India sola tenet tanti medicamina morbi, Dicitur & nostris ingemuisse malis.
Utile Tabacci dedit illa miserta venenum, Acci veratro quod meliora potest.
Jamque vides olidas libris fumare popinas: Naribus O doctis quam pretiosus odor! Hac ego praecipua credo herbam dote placere, Hinc tuus has nebulas Doctor in astra vehit.
Ah mea quid tandem facies timidissima charta? Exequias Siticen jam parat usque tuas.
Hunc subeas librum Sansti ceu limen asyli, Quem neque delebit flamma, nec ira fovis.


by Andrew Marvell | |

Translated

 Facundis dedit ille notis, interprete plumas
Insinuare sonos oculis, & pingere voces,
Et mentem chartis, oculis impertiit aurem.


by Andrew Marvell | |

Aliter

 Regibus haec posuit Ludovicus Templa futuris;
Gratior ast ipsi Castra fuere Domus.


by Andrew Marvell | |

A Garden Written after the Civil Wars

 SEE how the flowers, as at parade, 
Under their colours stand display'd: 
Each regiment in order grows, 
That of the tulip, pink, and rose.
But when the vigilant patrol Of stars walks round about the pole, Their leaves, that to the stalks are curl'd, Seem to their staves the ensigns furl'd.
Then in some flower's beloved hut Each bee, as sentinel, is shut, And sleeps so too; but if once stirr'd, She runs you through, nor asks the word.
O thou, that dear and happy Isle, The garden of the world erewhile, Thou Paradise of the four seas Which Heaven planted us to please, But, to exclude the world, did guard With wat'ry if not flaming sword; What luckless apple did we taste To make us mortal and thee waste! Unhappy! shall we never more That sweet militia restore, When gardens only had their towers, And all the garrisons were flowers; When roses only arms might bear, And men did rosy garlands wear?


by Andrew Marvell | |

The Fair Singer

 To make a final conquest of all me,
Love did compose so sweet an Enemy,
In whom both Beauties to my death agree,
Joyning themselves in fatal Harmony;
That while she with her Eyes my Heart does bind,
She with her Voice might captivate my Mind.
I could have fled from One but singly fair: My dis-intangled Soul it self might save, Breaking the curled trammels of her hair.
But how should I avoid to be her Slave, Whose subtile Art invisibly can wreath My Fetters of the very Air I breath? It had been easie fighting in some plain, Where Victory might hang in equal choice.
But all resistance against her is vain, Who has th' advantage both of Eyes and Voice.
And all my Forces needs must be undone, She having gained both the Wind and Sun.


by Andrew Marvell | |

The Mower To The Glo-Worms

 Ye living Lamps, by whose dear light
The Nightingale does sit so late,
And studying all the Summer-night,
Her matchless Songs does meditate;

Ye Country Comets, that portend
No War, nor Princes funeral,
Shining unto no higher end
Then to presage the Grasses fall;

Ye Glo-worms, whose officious Flame
To wandring Mowers shows the way,
That in the Night have lost their aim,
And after foolish Fires do stray;

Your courteous Lights in vain you wast,
Since Juliana here is come,
For She my Mind hath so displac'd
That I shall never find my home.


by Andrew Marvell | |

To Christina Queen of Sweden

 Verses to accompany a portrait of Cromwell

Bright Martial Maid, Queen of the frozen zone, 
The northern pole supports thy shining throne.
Behold what furrows age and steel can plough; The helmet's weight oppressed this wrinkled brow.
Through fate's untrodden paths I move; my hands Still act my free-born people's bold commands; Yet this stern shade, to you submits his frowns, Nor are these looks always severe to crowns.