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Best Famous Robert Louis Stevenson Poems

Here is a collection of the all-time best famous Robert Louis Stevenson poems. This is a select list of the best famous Robert Louis Stevenson poetry. Reading, writing, and enjoying famous Robert Louis Stevenson poetry (as well as classical and contemporary poems) is a great past time. These top poems are the best examples of Robert Louis Stevenson poems.

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by Robert Louis Stevenson | |

Loves Vicissitudes

 AS Love and Hope together
Walk by me for a while,
Link-armed the ways they travel
For many a pleasant mile -
Link-armed and dumb they travel,
They sing not, but they smile.
Hope leaving, Love commences To practise on the lute; And as he sings and travels With lingering, laggard foot, Despair plays obligato The sentimental flute.
Until in singing garments Comes royally, at call - Comes limber-hipped Indiff'rence Free stepping, straight and tall - Comes singing and lamenting, The sweetest pipe of all.


by Robert Louis Stevenson | |

Man Sails The Deep Awhile

 MAN sails the deep awhile;
Loud runs the roaring tide;
The seas are wild and wide;
O'er many a salt, o'er many a desert mile,
The unchained breakers ride,
The quivering stars beguile.
Hope bears the sole command; Hope, with unshaken eyes, Sees flaw and storm arise; Hope, the good steersman, with unwearying hand, Steers, under changing skies, Unchanged toward the land.
O wind that bravely blows! O hope that sails with all Where stars and voices call! O ship undaunted that forever goes Where God, her admiral, His battle signal shows! What though the seas and wind Far on the deep should whelm Colours and sails and helm? There, too, you touch that port that you designed - There, in the mid-seas' realm, Shall you that haven find.
Well hast thou sailed: now die, To die is not to sleep.
Still your true course you keep, O sailor soul, still sailing for the sky; And fifty fathom deep Your colours still shall fly.


by Robert Louis Stevenson | |

Marching Song

 Bring the comb and play upon it! 
Marching, here we come! 
Willie cocks his highland bonnet, 
Johnnie beats the drum.
Mary Jane commands the party, Peter leads the rear; Feet in time, alert and hearty, Each a Grenadier! All in the most martial manner Marching double-quick; While the napkin, like a banner, Waves upon the stick! Here's enough of fame and pillage, Great commander Jane! Now that we've been round the village, Let's go home again.


by Robert Louis Stevenson | |

Mine Eyes Were Swift To Know Thee

 MINE eyes were swift to know thee, and my heart
As swift to love.
I did become at once Thine wholly, thine unalterably, thine In honourable service, pure intent, Steadfast excess of love and laughing care: And as she was, so am, and so shall be.
I knew thee helpful, knew thee true, knew thee And Pity bedfellows: I heard thy talk With answerable throbbings.
On the stream, Deep, swift, and clear, the lilies floated; fish Through the shadows ran.
There, thou and I Read Kindness in our eyes and closed the match.


by Robert Louis Stevenson | |

Winter-Time

 Late lies the wintry sun a-bed, 
A frosty, fiery sleepy-head; 
Blinks but an hour or two; and then, 
A blood-red orange, sets again.
Before the stars have left the skies, At morning in the dark I rise; And shivering in my nakedness, By the cold candle, bathe and dress.
Close by the jolly fire I sit To warm my frozen bones a bit; Or with a reindeer-sled, explore The colder countries round the door.
When to go out, my nurse doth wrap Me in my comforter and cap; The cold wind burns my face, and blows Its frosty pepper up my nose.
Black are my steps on silver sod; Thick blows my frosty breath abroad; And tree and house, and hill and lake, Are frosted like a wedding cake.


by Robert Louis Stevenson | |

You Looked So Tempting In The Pew

 YOU looked so tempting in the pew,
You looked so sly and calm -
My trembling fingers played with yours
As both looked out the Psalm.
Your heart beat hard against my arm, My foot to yours was set, Your loosened ringlet burned my cheek Whenever they two met.
O little, little we hearkened, dear, And little, little cared, Although the parson sermonised, The congregation stared.


by Robert Louis Stevenson | |

The Land of Counterpane

 When I was sick and lay a-bed, 
I had two pillows at my head, 
And all my toys beside me lay, 
To keep me happy all the day.
And sometimes for an hour or so I watched my leaden soldiers go, With different uniforms and drills, Among the bed-clothes, through the hills; And sometimes sent my ships in fleets All up and down among the sheets; Or brought my trees and houses out, And planted cities all about.
I was the giant great and still That sits upon the pillow-hill, And sees before him, dale and plain, The pleasant land of counterpane.


by Robert Louis Stevenson | |

The Land of Nod

 From breakfast on through all the day
At home among my friends I stay,
But every night I go abroad
Afar into the land of Nod.
All by myself I have to go, With none to tell me what to do -- All alone beside the streams And up the mountain-sides of dreams.
The strangest things are there for me, Both things to eat and things to see, And many frightening sights abroad Till morning in the land of Nod.
Try as I like to find the way, I never can get back by day, Nor can remember plain and clear The curious music that I hear.


by Robert Louis Stevenson | |

Tempest Tossed And Sore Afflicted

 TEMPEST tossed and sore afflicted, sin defiled and care oppressed,
Come to me, all ye that labour; come, and I will give ye rest.
Fear no more, O doubting hearted; weep no more, O weeping eye! Lo, the voice of your redeemer; lo, the songful morning near.
Here one hour you toil and combat, sin and suffer, bleed and die; In my father's quiet mansion soon to lay your burden by.
Bear a moment, heavy laden, weary hand and weeping eye.
Lo, the feet of your deliverer; lo, the hour of freedom here.


by Robert Louis Stevenson | |

The Angler Rose He Took His Rod

 THE angler rose, he took his rod,
He kneeled and made his prayers to God.
The living God sat overhead: The angler tripped, the eels were fed


by Robert Louis Stevenson | |

Farewell to the Farm

 The coach is at the door at last; 
The eager children, mounting fast 
And kissing hands, in chorus sing: 
Good-bye, good-bye, to everything! 

To house and garden, field and lawn, 
The meadow-gates we swang upon, 
To pump and stable, tree and swing, 
Good-bye, good-bye, to everything! 

And fare you well for evermore, 
O ladder at the hayloft door, 
O hayloft where the cobwebs cling, 
Good-bye, good-bye, to everything! 

Crack goes the whip, and off we go; 
The trees and houses smaller grow; 
Last, round the woody turn we sing: 
Good-bye, good-bye, to everything!


by Robert Louis Stevenson | |

Armies in the Fire

 The lamps now glitter down the street; 
Faintly sound the falling feet; 
And the blue even slowly falls 
About the garden trees and walls.
Now in the falling of the gloom The red fire paints the empty room: And warmly on the roof it looks, And flickers on the back of books.
Armies march by tower and spire Of cities blazing, in the fire;-- Till as I gaze with staring eyes, The armies fall, the lustre dies.
Then once again the glow returns; Again the phantom city burns; And down the red-hot valley, lo! The phantom armies marching go! Blinking embers, tell me true Where are those armies marching to, And what the burning city is That crumbles in your furnaces!


by Robert Louis Stevenson | |

My Kingdom

 A little kingdom I possess 
where thoughts and feelings dwell, 
And very hard I find the task 
of governing it well; 
For passion tempts and troubles me, 
A wayward will misleads, 
And selfishness its shadow casts 
On all my words and deeds.
How can I learn to rule myself, to be the child I should, Honest and brave, nor ever tire Of trying to be good? How can I keep a sunny soul To shine along life's way? How can I tune my little heart To sweetly sing all day? Dear Father, help me with the love that casteth out my fear; Teach me to lean on thee, and feel That thou art very near, That no temptation is unseen No childish grief too small, Since thou, with patience infinite, Doth soothe and comfort all.
I do not ask for any crown But that which all may win Nor seek to conquer any world Except the one within.
Be thou my guide until I find, Led by a tender hand, Thy happy kingdom in myself And dare to take command.


by Robert Louis Stevenson | |

Lo! In Thine Honest Eyes I Read

 LO! in thine honest eyes I read
The auspicious beacon that shall lead,
After long sailing in deep seas,
To quiet havens in June ease.
Thy voice sings like an inland bird First by the seaworn sailor heard; And like road sheltered from life's sea Thine honest heart is unto me.


by Robert Louis Stevenson | |

Lo Now My Guest

 LO, now, my guest, if aught amiss were said,
Forgive it and dismiss it from your head.
For me, for you, for all, to close the date, Pass now the ev'ning sponge across the slate; And to that spirit of forgiveness keep Which is the parent and the child of sleep.


by Robert Louis Stevenson | |

The Cow

 Thank you, pretty cow, that made
Pleasant milk to soak my bread, 
Every day and every night, 
Warm, and fresh, and sweet, and white.
Do not chew the hemlock rank, Growing on the weedy bank; But the yellow cowslips eat; They perhaps will make it sweet.
Where the purple violet grows, Where the bubbling water flows, Where the grass is fresh and fine, Pretty cow, go there to dine.


by Robert Louis Stevenson | |

Looking Forward

 When I am grown to man's estate 
I shall be very proud and great, 
And tell the other girls and boys 
Not to meddle with my toys.


by Robert Louis Stevenson | |

Looking-Glass River

 Smooth it glides upon its travel, 
Here a wimple, there a gleam-- 
O the clean gravel! 
O the smooth stream! 

Sailing blossoms, silver fishes, 
Pave pools as clear as air-- 
How a child wishes 
To live down there! 

We can see our colored faces 
Floating on the shaken pool 
Down in cool places, 
Dim and very cool; 

Till a wind or water wrinkle, 
Dipping marten, plumping trout, 
Spreads in a twinkle 
And blots all out.
See the rings pursue each other; All below grows black as night, Just as if mother Had blown out the light! Patience, children, just a minute-- See the spreading circles die; The stream and all in it Will clear by-and-by.


by Robert Louis Stevenson | |

Loud And Low In The Chimney

 LOUD and low in the chimney
The squalls suspire;
Then like an answer dwindles
And glows the fire,
And the chamber reddens and darkens
In time like taken breath.
Near by the sounding chimney The youth apart Hearkens with changing colour And leaping heart, And hears in the coil of the tempest The voice of love and death.
Love on high in the flute-like And tender notes Sounds as from April meadows And hillside cotes; But the deep wood wind in the chimney Utters the slogan of death.


by Robert Louis Stevenson | |

Love What Is Love

 LOVE - what is love? A great and aching heart;
Wrung hands; and silence; and a long despair.
Life - what is life? Upon a moorland bare To see love coming and see love depart.