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Best Famous Friedrich Von Schiller Poems

Here is a collection of the all-time best famous Friedrich Von Schiller poems. This is a select list of the best famous Friedrich Von Schiller poetry. Reading, writing, and enjoying famous Friedrich Von Schiller poetry (as well as classical and contemporary poems) is a great past time. These top poems are the best examples of Friedrich von Schiller poems.

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by Friedrich von Schiller | |

Geniality

 How does the genius make itself known? In the way that in nature
Shows the Creator himself,--e'en in the infinite whole.
Clear is the ether, and yet of depth that ne'er can be fathomed; Seen by the eye, it remains evermore closed to the sense.


by Friedrich von Schiller | |

Love And Desire

 Rightly said, Schlosser! Man loves what he has; what he has not, desireth;
None but the wealthy minds love; poor minds desire alone.


by Friedrich von Schiller | |

Amalia

 Angel-fair, Walhalla's charms displaying,
Fairer than all mortal youths was he;
Mild his look, as May-day sunbeams straying
Gently o'er the blue and glassy sea.
And his kisses!--what ecstatic feeling! Like two flames that lovingly entwine, Like the harp's soft tones together stealing Into one sweet harmony divine,-- Soul and soul embraced, commingled, blended, Lips and cheeks with trembling passion burned, Heaven and earth, in pristine chaos ended, Round the blissful lovers madly turn'd.
He is gone--and, ah! with bitter anguish Vainly now I breathe my mournful sighs; He is gone--in hopeless grief I languish Earthly joys I ne'er again can prize!


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by Friedrich von Schiller | |

Archimedes

 To Archimedes once a scholar came,
"Teach me," he said, "the art that won thy fame;--
The godlike art which gives such boons to toil,
And showers such fruit upon thy native soil;--
The godlike art that girt the town when all
Rome's vengeance burst in thunder on the wall!"
"Thou call'st art godlike--it is so, in truth,
And was," replied the master to the youth,
"Ere yet its secrets were applied to use--
Ere yet it served beleaguered Syracuse:--
Ask'st thou from art, but what the art is worth?
The fruit?--for fruit go cultivate the earth.
-- He who the goddess would aspire unto, Must not the goddess as the woman woo!"


by Friedrich von Schiller | |

Astronomical Writings

 Oh, how infinite, how unspeakably great, are the heavens!
Yet by frivolity's hand downwards the heavens are pulled!


by Friedrich von Schiller | |

Majestas Populi

 Majesty of the nature of man! In crowds shall I seek thee?
'Tis with only a few that thou hast made thine abode.
Only a few ever count; the rest are but blanks of no value, And the prizes are hid 'neath the vain stir that they make.


by Friedrich von Schiller | |

The Duty Of All

 Ever strive for the whole; and if no whole thou canst make thee,
Join, then, thyself to some whole, as a subservient limb!


by Friedrich von Schiller | |

Inside And Outside

 God alone sees the heart and therefore, since he alone sees it,
Be it our care that we, too, something that's worthy may see.


by Friedrich von Schiller | |

A Problem

 Let none resemble another; let each resemble the highest!
How can that happen? let each be all complete in itself.


by Friedrich von Schiller | |

A Peculiar Ideal

 What thou thinkest, belongs to all; what thou feelest, is thine only.
Wouldst thou make him thine own, feel thou the God whom thou thinkest!


by Friedrich von Schiller | |

Beauteous Individuality

 Thou in truth shouldst be one, yet not with the whole shouldst thou be so.
'Tis through the reason thou'rt one,--art so with it through the heart.
Voice of the whole is thy reason, but thou thine own heart must be ever; If in thy heart reason dwells evermore, happy art thou.


by Friedrich von Schiller | |

Breadth And Depth

 Full many a shining wit one sees,
With tongue on all things well conversing;
The what can charm, the what can please,
In every nice detail rehearsing.
Their raptures so transport the college, It seems one honeymoon of knowledge.
Yet out they go in silence where They whilom held their learned prate; Ah! he who would achieve the fair, Or sow the embryo of the great, Must hoard--to wait the ripening hour-- In the least point the loftiest power.
With wanton boughs and pranksome hues, Aloft in air aspires the stem; The glittering leaves inhale the dews, But fruits are not concealed in them.
From the small kernel's undiscerned repose The oak that lords it o'er the forest grows.


by Friedrich von Schiller | |

Carthage

 Oh thou degenerate child of the great and glorious mother,
Who with the Romans' strong might couplest the Tyrians' deceit!
But those ever governed with vigor the earth they had conquered,--
These instructed the world that they with cunning had won.
Say! what renown does history grant thee? Thou, Roman-like, gained'st That with the steel, which with gold, Tyrian-like, then thou didst rule!


by Friedrich von Schiller | |

Human Knowledge

 Since thou readest in her what thou thyself hast there written,
And, to gladden the eye, placest her wonders in groups;--
Since o'er her boundless expanses thy cords to extend thou art able,
Thou dost think that thy mind wonderful Nature can grasp.
Thus the astronomer draws his figures over the heavens, So that he may with more ease traverse the infinite space, Knitting together e'en suns that by Sirius-distance are parted, Making them join in the swan and in the horns of the bull.
But because the firmament shows him its glorious surface, Can he the spheres' mystic dance therefore decipher aright?


by Friedrich von Schiller | |

Columbus

 Steer on, bold sailor--Wit may mock thy soul that sees the land,
And hopeless at the helm may droop the weak and weary hand,
Yet ever--ever to the West, for there the coast must lie,
And dim it dawns, and glimmering dawns before thy reason's eye;
Yea, trust the guiding God--and go along the floating grave,
Though hid till now--yet now behold the New World o'er the wave!
With genius Nature ever stands in solemn union still,
And ever what the one foretells the other shall fulfil.


by Friedrich von Schiller | |

Friend And Foe

 Dearly I love a friend; yet a foe I may turn to my profit;
Friends show me that which I can; foes teach me that which I should.


by Friedrich von Schiller | |

Dangerous Consequences

 Deeper and bolder truths be careful, my friends, of avowing;
For as soon as ye do all the world on ye will fall.


by Friedrich von Schiller | |

Difference Of Station

 Even the moral world its nobility boasts--vulgar natures
Reckon by that which they do; noble, by that which they are.


by Friedrich von Schiller | |

Different Destinies

 Millions busily toil, that the human race may continue;
But by only a few is propagated our kind.
Thousands of seeds by the autumn are scattered, yet fruit is engendered Only by few, for the most back to the element go.
But if one only can blossom, that one is able to scatter Even a bright living world, filled with creations eterne.


by Friedrich von Schiller | |

Dithyramb

 Believe me, together
The bright gods come ever,
Still as of old;
Scarce see I Bacchus, the giver of joy,
Than comes up fair Eros, the laugh-loving boy,
And Phoebus, the stately, behold!

They come near and nearer,
The heavenly ones all--
The gods with their presence
Fill earth as their hall!

Say, how shall I welcome,
Human and earthborn,
Sons of the sky?
Pour out to me--pour the full life that ye live!
What to ye, O ye gods! can the mortal one give?

The joys can dwell only
In Jupiter's palace--
Brimmed bright with your nectar,
Oh, reach me the chalice!

"Hebe, the chalice
Fill full to the brim!
Steep his eyes--steep his eyes in the bath of the dew,
Let him dream, while the Styx is concealed from his view,
That the life of the gods is for him!"

It murmurs, it sparkles,
The fount of delight;
The bosom grows tranquil--
The eye becomes bright.


by Friedrich von Schiller | |

Elysium

 Past the despairing wail--
And the bright banquets of the Elysian vale
Melt every care away!
Delight, that breathes and moves forever,
Glides through sweet fields like some sweet river!
Elysian life survey!
There, fresh with youth, o'er jocund meads,
His merry west-winds blithely leads
The ever-blooming May!
Through gold-woven dreams goes the dance of the hours,
In space without bounds swell the soul and its powers,
And truth, with no veil, gives her face to the day.
And joy to-day and joy to-morrow, But wafts the airy soul aloft; The very name is lost to sorrow, And pain is rapture tuned more exquisitely soft.
Here the pilgrim reposes the world-weary limb, And forgets in the shadow, cool-breathing and dim, The load he shall bear never more; Here the mower, his sickle at rest, by the streams, Lulled with harp-strings, reviews, in the calm of his dreams, The fields, when the harvest is o'er.
Here, he, whose ears drank in the battle roar, Whose banners streamed upon the startled wind A thunder-storm,--before whose thunder tread The mountains trembled,--in soft sleep reclined, By the sweet brook that o'er its pebbly bed In silver plays, and murmurs to the shore, Hears the stern clangor of wild spears no more! Here the true spouse the lost-beloved regains, And on the enamelled couch of summer-plains Mingles sweet kisses with the zephyr's breath.
Here, crowned at last, love never knows decay, Living through ages its one bridal day, Safe from the stroke of death!


by Friedrich von Schiller | |

Evening

 Oh! thou bright-beaming god, the plains are thirsting,
Thirsting for freshening dew, and man is pining;
Wearily move on thy horses--
Let, then, thy chariot descend!

Seest thou her who, from ocean's crystal billows,
Lovingly nods and smiles?--Thy heart must know her!
Joyously speed on thy horses,--
Tethys, the goddess, 'tis nods!

Swiftly from out his flaming chariot leaping,
Into her arms he springs,--the reins takes Cupid,--
Quietly stand the horses,
Drinking the cooling flood.
Now from the heavens with gentle step descending, Balmy night appears, by sweet love followed; Mortals, rest ye, and love ye,-- Phoebus, the loving one, rests!


by Friedrich von Schiller | |

Light And Warmth

 In cheerful faith that fears no ill
The good man doth the world begin;
And dreams that all without shall still
Reflect the trusting soul within.
Warm with the noble vows of youth, Hallowing his true arm to the truth; Yet is the littleness of all So soon to sad experience shown, That crowds but teach him to recall And centre thought on self alone; Till love, no more, emotion knows, And the heart freezes to repose.
Alas! though truth may light bestow, Not always warmth the beams impart, Blest he who gains the boon to know, Nor buys the knowledge with the heart.
For warmth and light a blessing both to be, Feel as the enthusiast--as the world-wise see.


by Friedrich von Schiller | |

Longing

 Could I from this valley drear,
Where the mist hangs heavily,
Soar to some more blissful sphere,
Ah! how happy should I be!
Distant hills enchant my sight,
Ever young and ever fair;
To those hills I'd take my flight
Had I wings to scale the air.
Harmonies mine ear assail, Tunes that breathe a heavenly calm; And the gently-sighing gale Greets me with its fragrant balm.
Peeping through the shady bowers, Golden fruits their charms display.
And those sweetly-blooming flowers Ne'er become cold winter's prey.
In you endless sunshine bright, Oh! what bliss 'twould be to dwell! How the breeze on yonder height Must the heart with rapture swell! Yet the stream that hems my path Checks me with its angry frown, While its waves, in rising wrath, Weigh my weary spirit down.
See--a bark is drawing near, But, alas, the pilot fails! Enter boldly--wherefore fear? Inspiration fills its sails, Faith and courage make thine own,-- Gods ne'er lend a helping-hand; 'Tis by magic power alone Thou canst reach the magic land!


by Friedrich von Schiller | |

Female Judgement

 Man frames his judgment on reason; but woman on love founds her verdict;
If her judgment loves not, woman already has judged.