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Best Famous Dorothy Parker Poems

Here is a collection of the all-time best famous Dorothy Parker poems. This is a select list of the best famous Dorothy Parker poetry. Reading, writing, and enjoying famous Dorothy Parker poetry (as well as classical and contemporary poems) is a great past time. These top poems are the best examples of Dorothy Parker poems.

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Written by Dorothy Parker |

Autumn Valentine

 In May my heart was breaking-
Oh, wide the wound, and deep!
And bitter it beat at waking,
And sore it split in sleep.
And when it came November, I sought my heart, and sighed, "Poor thing, do you remember?" "What heart was that?" it cried.

Written by Dorothy Parker |

The Gentlest Lady

 They say He was a serious child,
And quiet in His ways;
They say the gentlest lady smiled
To hear the neighbors' praise.
The coffers of her heart would close Upon their smaliest word.
Yet did they say, "How tall He grows!" They thought she had not heard.
They say upon His birthday eve She'd rock Him to His rest As if she could not have Him leave The shelter of her breast.
The poor must go in bitter thrift, The poor must give in pain, But ever did she get a gift To greet His day again.
They say she'd kiss the Boy awake, And hail Him gay and clear, But oh, her heart was like to break To count another year.

Written by Dorothy Parker |

For A Favorite Granddaughter

 Never love a simple lad,
Guard against a wise,
Shun a timid youth and sad,
Hide from haunted eyes.
Never hold your heart in pain For an evil-doer; Never flip it down the lane To a gifted wooer.
Never love a loving son, Nor a sheep astray; Gather up your skirts and run From a tender way.
Never give away a tear, Never toss a pine; Should you heed my words, my dear, You're no blood of mine!

More great poems below...

Written by Dorothy Parker |


 Secrets, you said, would hold us two apart;
You'd have me know of you your least transgression,
And so the intimate places of your heart,
Kneeling, you bared to me, as in confession.
Softly you told of loves that went before- Of clinging arms, of kisses gladly given; Luxuriously clean of heart once more, You rose up, then, and stood before me, shriven.
When this, my day of happiness, is through, And love, that bloomed so fair, turns brown and brittle, There is a thing that I shall ask of you- I, who have given so much, and asked so little.
Some day, when there's another in my stead, Again you'll feel the need of absolution, And you will go to her, and bow your head, And offer her your past, as contribution.
When with your list of loves you overcome her, For Heaven's sake, keep this one secret from her!

Written by Dorothy Parker |

Fair Weather

 This level reach of blue is not my sea;
Here are sweet waters, pretty in the sun,
Whose quiet ripples meet obediently
A marked and measured line, one after one.
This is no sea of mine.
that humbly laves Untroubled sands, spread glittering and warm.
I have a need of wilder, crueler waves; They sicken of the calm, who knew the storm.
So let a love beat over me again, Loosing its million desperate breakers wide; Sudden and terrible to rise and wane; Roaring the heavens apart; a reckless tide That casts upon the heart, as it recedes, Splinters and spars and dripping, salty weeds.

Written by Dorothy Parker |

General Review Of The Sex Situation

 Woman wants monogamy;
Man delights in novelty.
Love is woman's moon and sun; Man has other forms of fun.
Woman lives but in her lord; Count to ten, and man is bored.
With this the gist and sum of it, What earthly good can come of it?

Written by Dorothy Parker |

A Portrait

 Because my love is quick to come and go-
A little here, and then a little there-
What use are any words of mine to swear
My heart is stubborn, and my spirit slow
Of weathering the drip and drive of woe?
What is my oath, when you have but to bare
My little, easy loves; and I can dare
Only to shrug, and answer, "They are so"?

You do not know how heavy a heart it is
That hangs about my neck- a clumsy stone
Cut with a birth, a death, a bridal-day.
Each time I love, I find it still my own, Who take it, now to that lad, now to this, Seeking to give the wretched thing away.

Written by Dorothy Parker |


 If I had a shiny gun,
I could have a world of fun
Speeding bullets through the brains
Of the folk who give me pains;

Or had I some poison gas,
I could make the moments pass
Bumping off a number of
People whom I do not love.
But I have no lethal weapon- Thus does Fate our pleasure step on! So they still are quick and well Who should be, by rights, in hell.

Written by Dorothy Parker |

A Fairly Sad Tale

 I think that I shall never know
Why I am thus, and I am so.
Around me, other girls inspire In men the rush and roar of fire, The sweet transparency of glass, The tenderness of April grass, The durability of granite; But me- I don't know how to plan it.
The lads I've met in Cupid's deadlock Were- shall we say?- born out of wedlock.
They broke my heart, they stilled my song, And said they had to run along, Explaining, so to sop my tears, First came their parents or careers.
But ever does experience Deny me wisdom, calm, and sense! Though she's a fool who seeks to capture The twenty-first fine, careless rapture, I must go on, till ends my rope, Who from my birth was cursed with hope.
A heart in half is chaste, archaic; But mine resembles a mosaic- The thing's become ridiculous! Why am I so? Why am I thus?

Written by Dorothy Parker |


 Authors and actors and artists and such
Never know nothing, and never know much.
Sculptors and singers and those of their kidney Tell their affairs from Seattle to Sydney.
Playwrights and poets and such horses' necks Start off from anywhere, end up at sex.
Diarists, critics, and similar roe Never say nothing, and never say no.
People Who Do Things exceed my endurance; God, for a man that solicits insurance!

Written by Dorothy Parker |


 If I should labor through daylight and dark,
Consecrate, valorous, serious, true,
Then on the world I may blazon my mark;
And what if I don't, and what if I do?

Written by Dorothy Parker |

Fighting Words

 Say my love is easy had,
Say I'm bitten raw with pride,
Say I am too often sad-
Still behold me at your side.
Say I'm neither brave nor young, Say I woo and coddle care, Say the devil touched my tongue- Still you have my heart to wear.
But say my verses do not scan, And I get me another man!

Written by Dorothy Parker |

Lines On Reading Too Many Poets

 Roses, rooted warm in earth,
Bud in rhyme, another age;
Lilies know a ghostly birth
Strewn along a patterned page;
Golden lad and chimbley sweep
Die; and so their song shall keep.
Wind that in Arcadia starts In and out a couplet plays; And the drums of bitter hearts Beat the measure of a phrase.
Sweets and woes but come to print Quae cum ita sint.

Written by Dorothy Parker |

For A Sad Lady

 And let her loves, when she is dead,
Write this above her bones:
"No more she lives to give us bread
Who asked her only stones.

Written by Dorothy Parker |


 Four be the things I am wiser to know:
Idleness, sorrow, a friend, and a foe.
Four be the things I’d been better without: Love, curiosity, freckles, and doubt.
Three be the things I shall never attain: Envy, content, and sufficient champagne.
Three be the things I shall have till I die: Laughter and hope and a sock in the eye.