Greeting Card Maker | Poem Art Generator

Free online greeting card maker or poetry art generator. Create free custom printable greeting cards or art from photos and text online. Use PoetrySoup's free online software to make greeting cards from poems, quotes, or your own words. Generate memes, cards, or poetry art for any occasion; weddings, anniversaries, holidays, etc (See examples here). Make a card to show your loved one how special they are to you. Once you make a card, you can email it, download it, or share it with others on your favorite social network site like Facebook. Also, you can create shareable and downloadable cards from poetry on PoetrySoup. Use our poetry search engine to find the perfect poem, and then click the camera icon to create the card or art.



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www.poetrysoup.com - Create a card from your words, quote, or poetry
THE APPOINTMENT
Flamingo silk.
New ruff,
the ivory ghost
of a halter.
Chestnut curls,

*

commas behind the ear.

"Taller, by half a head,
than my Lord Walsingham.
"

*

His Devon-cream brogue,
malt eyes.
New cloak
mussed in her mud.


*

The Queen leans forward,
a rosy envelope of civet.

A cleavage

*

whispering seed pearls.

Her own sleeve
rubs that speck of dirt

*

on his cheek.
Three thousand
ornamental fruit baskets
swing in the smoke.


*

"It is our pleasure
to have our servant trained
some longer time

*

in Ireland.
" Stamp out
marks of the Irish.

Their saffron smocks.


*

All curroughs, bards
and rhymers.
Desmonds
and Fitzgeralds

*

stuck on low spikes,
an avenue of heads to
the war tent.



*

Kerry timber
sold to the Canaries.

Pregnant girls

*

hung in their own hair
on city walls.
Plague
crumpling gargoyles

*

through Munster.
"They spoke
like ghosts crying
out of their graves.
"
Written by: Ruth Padel