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Walter De La Mare Short Poems

Famous Short Walter De La Mare Poems. Short poetry by famous poet Walter De La Mare. A collection of the all-time best Walter De La Mare short poems


by Walter de la Mare
 Nay, nay, sweet England, do not grieve! 
Not one of these poor men who died 
But did within his soul believe 
That death for thee was glorified.
Ever they watched it hovering near That mystery 'yond thought to plumb, Perchance sometimes in loathèd fear They heard cold Danger whisper, Come! -- Heard and obeyed.
O, if thou weep Such courage and honour, beauty, care, Be it for joy that those who sleep Only thy joy could share.



Why?  Create an image from this poem
by Walter de la Mare
 Ever, ever
Stir and shiver
The reeds and rushes
By the river:
Ever, ever,
As if in dream,
The lone moon's silver
Sleeks the stream.
What old sorrow, What lost love, Moon, reeds, rushes, Dream you of?

Alone  Create an image from this poem
by Walter de la Mare
 The abode of the nightingale is bare,
Flowered frost congeals in the gelid air,
The fox howls from his frozen lair:
Alas, my loved one is gone,
I am alone:
It is winter.
Once the pink cast a winy smell, The wild bee hung in the hyacinth bell, Light in effulgence of beauty fell: I am alone: It is winter.
My candle a silent fire doth shed, Starry Orion hunts o'erhead; Come moth, come shadow, the world is dead: Alas, my loved one is gone, I am alone; It is winter.

by Walter de la Mare
 When the rose is faded, 
Memory may still dwell on 
Her beauty shadowed, 
And the sweet smell gone.
That vanishing loveliness, That burdening breath, No bond of life hath then, Nor grief of death.
'Tis the immortal thought Whose passion still Makes the changing The unchangeable.
Oh, thus thy beauty, Loveliest on earth to me, Dark with no sorrow, shines And burns, with thee.

by Walter de la Mare
 Wide are the meadows of night, 
And daisies are shinng there, 
Tossing their lovely dews, 
Lustrous and fair; 

And through these sweet fields go, 
Wanderers amid the stars -- 
Venus, Mercury, Uranus, Neptune, 
Saturn, Jupiter, Mars.
'Tired in their silver, they move, And circling, whisper and say, Fair are the blossoming meads of delight Through which we stray.



by Walter de la Mare
 Here lies a most beautiful lady, 
Light of step and heart was she; 
I think she was the most beautiful lady 
That ever was in the West Country.
But beauty vanishes, beauty passes; However rare -- rare it be; And when I crumble,who will remember This lady of the West Country.

by Walter de la Mare
 Coral and clear emerald, 
And amber from the sea, 
Lilac-coloured amethyst, 
Chalcedony; 
The lovely Spirit of Air 
Floats on a cloud and doth ride, 
Clad in the beauties of earth 
Like a bride.
So doth she haunt me; and words Tell but a tithe of the tale.
Sings all the sweetness of Spring Even in the nightengale? Nay, but with echoes she cries Of the valley of love; Dews on the thorns of her feet, And darkness above.

by Walter de la Mare
 'What is the world, O soldiers?
It is I:
I, this incessant snow,
This northern sky;
Soldiers, this solitude
Through which we go
Is I.
'

Alone  Create an image from this poem
by Walter de la Mare
 Over the fence, the dead settle in
for a journey.
Nine o'clock.
You are alone for the first time today.
Boys asleep.
Husband out.
A beer bottle sweats in your hand, and sea lavender clogs the air with perfume.
Think of yourself.
Your arms rest with nothing to do after weeks spent attending to others.
Your thoughts turn to whether butter will last the week, how much longer the car can run on its partial tank of gas.

by Walter de la Mare
 Three jolly gentlemen, 
In coats of red, 
Rode their horses 
Up to bed.
Three jolly gentlemen Snored till morn, Their horses champing The golden corn.
Three jolly gentlemen At break of day, Came clitter-clatter down the stairs And galloped away.

by Walter de la Mare
 Some one came knocking
At my wee, small door;
Someone came knocking;
I'm sure-sure-sure;
I listened, I opened,
I looked to left and right,
But nought there was a stirring
In the still dark night;
Only the busy beetle
Tap-tapping in the wall,
Only from the forest
The screech-owl's call,
Only the cricket whistling
While the dewdrops fall,
So I know not who came knocking,
At all, at all, at all.

Winter  Create an image from this poem
by Walter de la Mare
 A DIAMOND glow of winter o’er the world:
Amid the chilly halo nigh the west
Flickers a phantom violet bloom unfurled
 Dim on the twilight’s breast.
Only phantasmal blooms but for an hour, A transient beauty; then the white stars shine Chilling the heart: I long for thee to flower, O bud of light divine.
But never visible to sense or thought The flower of Beauty blooms afar withdrawn; If in our being then we know it not, Or, knowing, it is gone.

by Walter de la Mare
 "Sweep thy faint strings, Musician,
With thy long lean hand;
Downward the starry tapers burn,
Sinks soft the waning sand;
The old hound whimpers couched in sleep,
The embers smoulder low;
Across the walls the shadows
Come, and go.
Sweep softly thy strings, Musician, The minutes mount to hours; Frost on the windless casement weaves A labyrinth of flowers; Ghosts linger in the darkening air, Hearken at the open door; Music hath called them, dreaming, Home once more.
"

Winter  Create an image from this poem
by Walter de la Mare
 Clouded with snow 
The cold winds blow, 
And shrill on leafless bough 
The robin with its burning breast 
Alone sings now.
The rayless sun, Day's journey done, Sheds its last ebbing light On fields in leagues of beauty spread Unearthly white.
Thick draws the dark, And spark by spark, The frost-fires kindle, and soon Over that sea of frozen foam Floats the white moon.

by Walter de la Mare
 Most wounds can Time repair;
But some are mortal -- these:
For a broken heart there is no balm,
No cure for a heart at ease --

At ease, but cold as stone,
Though the intellect spin on,
And the feat and practiced face may show
Nought of the life that is gone;

But smiles, as by habit taught;
And sighs, as by custom led;
And the soul within is safe from damnation,
Since it is dead.

by Walter de la Mare
 Tom told his dog called Tim to beg, 
And up at once he sat, 
His two clear amber eyes fixed fast, 
His haunches on his mat.
Tom poised a lump of sugar on His nose; then, "Trust!" says he; Stiff as a guardsman sat his Tim; Never a hair stirred he.
"Paid for!" says Tom; and in a trice Up jerked that moist black nose; A snap of teeth, a crunch, a munch, And down the sugar goes!

by Walter de la Mare
 At the edge of All the Ages 
A Knight sate on his steed, 
His armor red and thin with rust 
His soul from sorrow freed; 
And he lifted up his visor 
From a face of skin and bone, 
And his horse turned head and whinnied 
As the twain stood there alone.
No bird above that steep of time Sang of a livelong quest; No wind breathed, Rest: "Lone for an end!" cried Knight to steed, Loosed an eager rein-- Charged with his challenge into space: And quiet did quiet remain.