Blood Feud

by
 Once, when my husband was a child, there came
To his father's table, one who called him kin,
In sunbleached corduroys paler than his skin.
His look was grave and kind; he bore the name Of the dead singer of Senlac, and his smile.
Shyly and courteously he smiled and spoke; "I've been in the laurel since the winter broke; Four months, I reckon; yes, sir, quite a while.
" He'd killed a score of foemen in the past, In some blood feud, a dark and monstrous thing; To him it seemed his duty.
At the last His enemies found him by a forest spring, Which, as he died, lay bright beneath his head, A silver shield that slowly turned to red.

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