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Famous Women Poems by Famous Poets

These are examples of famous Women poems written by some of the greatest and most-well-known modern and classical poets. PoetrySoup is a great educational poetry resource of famous women poems. These examples illustrate what a famous women poem looks like and its form, scheme, or style (where appropriate).

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by Shakespeare, William
...All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first, the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.
Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furna...Read More



by Whitman, Walt
...and conformity to them that like! 
Peace, obesity, allegiance, to them that like! 
I am he who tauntingly compels men, women, nations, 
Crying, Leap from your seats, and contend for your lives! 

I am he who walks the States with a barb’d tongue, questioning every one I meet;
Who are you, that wanted only to be told what you knew before? 
Who are you, that wanted only a book to join you in your nonsense? 

(With pangs and cries, as thine own, O bearer of many children! 
Thes...Read More

by Longfellow, Henry Wadsworth
...over the meadows a drum beat.
Thronged erelong was the church with men. Without, in the churchyard,
Waited the women. They stood by the graves, and hung on the headstones
Garlands of autumn-leaves and evergreens fresh from the forest.
Then came the guard from the ships, and marching proudly among them
Entered the sacred portal. With loud and dissonant clangor
Echoed the sound of their brazen drums from ceiling and casement,--
Echoed a moment only, and slo...Read More

by Sandburg, Carl
...e Sunday afternoon I wandered out along
the Desplaines river
And I saw a crowd of Hungarians under the trees with
their women and children 
and a keg of beer and an
accordion....Read More

by Wilde, Oscar
...e brotherhood, the harmony
Of living in the healthful air, the swift
Clean beauty of strong limbs when men are free
And women chaste, these are the things which lift
Our souls up more than even Agnolo's
Gaunt blinded Sibyl poring o'er the scroll of human woes,

Or Titian's little maiden on the stair
White as her own sweet lily and as tall,
Or Mona Lisa smiling through her hair, -
Ah! somehow life is bigger after all
Than any painted angel, could we see
The God that is within ...Read More



by Alighieri, Dante
..., 
 But round us sighs so many and deep there came 
 That all the air was motioned. I beheld 
 Concourse of men and women and children there 
 Countless. No pain was theirs of cold or flame, 
 But sadness only. And my Master said, 
 "Art silent here? Before ye further go 
 Among them wondering, it is meet ye know 
 They are not sinful, nor the depths below 
 Shall claim them. But their lives of righteousness 
 Sufficed not to redeem. The gate decreed, 
 Be...Read More

by Angelou, Maya
...ed not be lived again.
Lift up your eyes upon
The day breaking for you.
Give birth again
To the dream.
Women, children, men,
Take it into the palms of your hands.
Mold it into the shape of your most
Private need. Sculpt it into
The image of your most public self.
Lift up your hearts.
Each new hour holds new chances
For new beginnings.
Do not be wedded forever
To fear, yoked eternally
To brutishness.
The horizon leans forward...Read More

by Whitman, Walt
...s, once more, 
And through the orchard and along the old lanes once more. 

5
O male and female! 
O the presence of women! (I swear there is nothing more exquisite to me than the mere
 presence
 of women;) 
O for the girl, my mate! O for the happiness with my mate!
O the young man as I pass! O I am sick after the friendship of him who, I fear, is
 indifferent
 to me. 

O the streets of cities! 
The flitting faces—the expressions, eyes, feet, costumes! O I cannot tell ...Read More

by Tennyson, Alfred Lord
...ever when it broke
The statues, king or saint, or founder fell;
Then from the gaps and chasms of ruin left
Came men and women in dark clusters round,
Some crying, "Set them up! they shall not fall!"
And others "Let them lie, for they have fall'n."
And still they strove and wrangled: and she grieved
In her strange dream, she knew not why, to find
Their wildest wailings never out of tune
With that sweet note; and ever as their shrieks
Ran highest up the gamut, that great wa...Read More

by Frost, Robert
...ing, which is what
You like, and like him for.”

“Oh, yes you do.
You like your fun as well as anyone;
Only you women have to put these airs on
To impress men. You’ve got us so ashamed
Of being men we can’t look at a good fight
Between two boys and not feel bound to stop it.
Let the man freeze an ear or two, I say.—
He’s here. I leave him all to you. Go in
And save his life.— All right, come in, Meserve.
Sit down, sit down. How did you ...Read More

by Whitman, Walt
...d I know that the spirit of God is the brother of my own;
And that all the men ever born are also my brothers, and the women my sisters
 and lovers; 
And that a kelson of the creation is love; 
And limitless are leaves, stiff or drooping in the fields; 
And brown ants in the little wells beneath them; 
And mossy scabs of the worm fence, and heap’d stones, elder, mullen and
 poke-weed.

6
A child said, What is the grass? fetching it to me with full hands; 
How c...Read More

by Whitman, Walt
...ow they suffice for those who belong to them.

(Still here I carry my old delicious burdens; 
I carry them, men and women—I carry them with me wherever I go; 
I swear it is impossible for me to get rid of them; 
I am fill’d with them, and I will fill them in return.) 

2
You road I enter upon and look around! I believe you are not all that is here;
I believe that much unseen is also here. 

Here the profound lesson of reception, neither preference or denial; 
The ...Read More

by Chesterton, G K
...gold like frozen fire.

"Smells that a man might swill in a cup,
Stones that a man might eat,
And the great smooth women like ivory
That the Turks sell in the street."

He sang the song of the thief of the world,
And the gods that love the thief;
And he yelled aloud at the cloister-yards,
Where men go gathering grief.

"Well have you sung, O stranger,
Of death on the dyke in Wales,
Your chief was a bracelet-giver;
But the red unbroken river
Of a race runs not for...Read More

by Tennyson, Alfred Lord
...Drove me from all vainglories, rivalries, 
And earthly heats that spring and sparkle out 
Among us in the jousts, while women watch 
Who wins, who falls; and waste the spiritual strength 
Within us, better offered up to Heaven.' 

To whom the monk: `The Holy Grail!--I trust 
We are green in Heaven's eyes; but here too much 
We moulder--as to things without I mean-- 
Yet one of your own knights, a guest of ours, 
Told us of this in our refectory, 
But spake with such a sad...Read More

by Chaucer, Geoffrey
...cy and succour.
Have mercy on our woe and our distress;
Some drop of pity, through thy gentleness,
Upon us wretched women let now fall.
For certes, lord, there is none of us all
That hath not been a duchess or a queen;
Now be we caitives*, as it is well seen: *captives
Thanked be Fortune, and her false wheel,
That *none estate ensureth to be wele*. *assures no continuance of
And certes, lord, t'abiden your presence prosperous estate*
Here in this temple of the god...Read More

by Scott, Sir Walter
...My sire's tall form might grace the part
     Of Ferragus or Ascabart,
     But in the absent giant's hold
     Are women now, and menials old.'
     XXIX.

     The mistress of the mansion came,
     Mature of age, a graceful dame,
     Whose easy step and stately port
     Had well become a princely court,
     To whom, though more than kindred knew,
     Young Ellen gave a mother's due.
     Meet welcome to her guest she made,
     And every courteous rite wa...Read More

by Shelley, Percy Bysshe
...nor other trace I find
But as of foam after the Ocean's wrath
Is spent upon the desert shore.--Behind,
Old men, and women foully disarrayed
Shake their grey hair in the insulting wind,
Limp in the dance & strain, with limbs decayed,
Seeking to reach the light which leaves them still
Farther behind & deeper in the shade.
But not the less with impotence of will
They wheel, though ghastly shadows interpose
Round them & round each other, and fulfill
Their work and to the ...Read More

by Eliot, T S (Thomas Stearns)
...wind in that
door still?"
126. Cf. Part I, l. 37, 48.
138. Cf. the game of chess in Middleton's Women beware
Women.
III. THE FIRE SERMON
176. V. Spenser, Prothalamion.
192. Cf. The Tempest, I. ii.
196. Cf. Marvell, To His Coy Mistress.
197. Cf. Day, Parliament of Bees:
 "When of the sudden, listening, you shall
hear,
 "A noise of horns and hunting, which shall
bring
 "Actaeon to Diana in the sprin...Read More

by Miller, Alice Duer
...XXVIII 
I settled down in Devon, 
When Johnnie went to France. 
Such a tame ending 
To a great romance— 
Two lonely women 
With nothing much to do 
But get to know each other; 
She did and I did, too. 
Mornings at the rectory 
Learning how to roll 
Bandages, and always 
Saving light and coal.
Oh, that house was bitter
As winter closed in,
In spite of heavy stockings
And woollen next the skin.
I was cold and wretched,
And never unaware
Of John more cold and wre...Read More

by Plath, Sylvia
...r>
I have tried not to think too hard. I have tried to be natural.
I have tried to be blind in love, like other women,
Blind in my bed, with my dear blind sweet one,
Not looking, through the thick dark, for the face of another.

I did not look. But still the face was there,
The face of the unborn one that loved its perfections,
The face of the dead one that could only be perfect
In its easy peace, could only keep holy so.
And then there were other faces.Read More

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