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Best Famous Cinquain Poems

Here is a collection of the all-time best famous Cinquain poems. This is a select list of the best famous Cinquain poetry. Reading, writing, and enjoying famous Cinquain poetry (as well as classical and contemporary poems) is a great past time. These top poems are the best examples of cinquain poems.

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Poems are below...



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Written by Adelaide Crapsey | Create an image from this poem

November Night

Listen.
.
With faint dry sound, Like steps of passing ghosts, The leaves, frost-crisp'd, break from the trees And fall.
Written by Adelaide Crapsey | Create an image from this poem

Release

With swift
Great sweep of her
Magnificent arm my pain
Clanged back the doors that shut my soul
From life.
Written by Edgar Allan Poe | Create an image from this poem

To Helen

Helen thy beauty is to me
Like those Nicean barks of yore 
That gently o'er a perfumed sea 
The weary wayworn wanderer bore
To his own native shore.
On desperate seas long wont to roam Thy hyacinth hair thy classic face Thy Naiad airs have brought me home To the glory that was Greece And the grandeur that was Rome.
Lo! in yon brilliant window-niche How statue-like I see thee stand The agate lamp within thy hand! Ah Psyche from the regions which Are Holy Land!
Written by Adelaide Crapsey | Create an image from this poem

Snow

Look up…
From bleakening hills
Blows down the light, first breath
Of wintry wind…look up, and scent
The snow!
Written by George Herbert | Create an image from this poem

The World

Love built a stately house, where Fortune came,
And spinning fancies, she was heard to say
That her fine cobwebs did support the frame,
Whereas they were supported by the same;
But Wisdom quickly swept them all away.
The Pleasure came, who, liking not the fashion, Began to make balconies, terraces, Till she had weakened all by alteration; But reverend laws, and many a proclomation Reform?d all at length with menaces.
Then entered Sin, and with that sycamore Whose leaves first sheltered man from drought and dew, Working and winding slily evermore, The inward walls and summers cleft and tore; But Grace shored these, and cut that as it grew.
Then Sin combined with death in a firm band, To raze the building to the very floor; Which they effected,--none could them withstand; But Love and Grace took Glory by the hand, And built a braver palace than before.
Written by Adelaide Crapsey | Create an image from this poem

Trapped

Well and
If day on day
Follows, and weary year
On year…and ever days and years…
Well?
Written by Adelaide Crapsey | Create an image from this poem

MOON-SHADOWS

Still as
On windless nights
The moon-cast shadows are,
So still will be my heart when I
Am dead.
Written by Adelaide Crapsey | Create an image from this poem

YOUTH

But me
They cannot touch,
Old Age and death…the strange
And ignominious end of old
Dead folk!
Written by Adelaide Crapsey | Create an image from this poem

Winter

The cold
With steely clutch
Grips all the land…alack,
The little people in the hills
Will die!
Written by Ron Padgett | Create an image from this poem

Hotel

My room looks like a cage
The sun sticks its arm through the window
But I who want to smoke and make mirages
I light my cigarette with daylight
I don’t want to work I want to smoke
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