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Spring Birthday Poems | Spring Poems About Birthday

These Spring Birthday poems are examples of Spring poems about Birthday. These are the best examples of Spring Birthday poems written by international PoetrySoup poets

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Details | Bio |

My Favorite Number

I was born on July 20, 1958.

Being one of seven children and having a mid-summer birthday, even as a young boy, it was 
not uncommon for my birthdays to come and go without much fanfare.

In the winter of my Fifth Grade year at school, we had an assignment to write a short-story.  
I was already in love with writing way back then.  My short story was on a topic that was 
very much in the news at that time and a very interesting and exciting theme for a young 
boy.  I wrote a short story about me being the youngest astronaut in the space program and 
being selected to be the first astronaut to walk on the moon.  I was aware at the time, that 
the US and USSR were in a Cold War race to be the first country to achieve that lofty goal 
and I knew it was bound to happen soon.  To make my story even more special, I wrote that 
this wonderful event would take place over the coming summer, on my birthday!

Well, lo and behold, as the winter turned to spring and spring turned into summer the Apollo 
11 space mission launched from Cape Canaveral carrying three astronauts, two of whom 
were targeted to walk on the moon.

As my 11th birthday approached, without any notice from anyone else, I watched in awe as 
the Apollo 11 made its way to the moon.  On July 20th, 1969, the lunar landing module, 
Eagle, set down on the moon!  I remember expectantly waiting for the astronauts to be given 
permission to exit the Eagle and step foot on the moon’s surface as the hours of my birthday 
ticked down.  

It was about 10:00 pm eastern time when my parents finally sent us all to bed on the news 
that Mission Control made the decision to wait until the next day to send Neil Armstrong out 
of the lunar module.  With tears in my eyes, I went to bed thinking that I missed my chance 
to share my birthday with history and to have had my short story prognostication come true.

At a few minutes before 11:00 my parents woke all of us up to come watch as Neil 
Armstrong could wait no longer and talked Mission Control into letting him walk on the moon 
without further delay.

So, at about 11:00 pm, on my 11th birthday, the men from Apollo 11 walked on the moon for 
the first time in history.  One small step for man and one giant link to history for one small 
boy in Charleston, West Virginia.

And, that is when 11 became my favorite number.

Copyright © Joe Flach | Year Posted 2010



Details | Free verse |

Birthday Wish

Spring comes,
Bringing novel flowers
To this multicolored Earth, 
A really wretched place actually,
If you know the awful truth about it

Spring leaves, 
Taking some flowers with it, 
Bestowing freedom 
Upon these fortunate plants

Seventeen springs ago,
An ordinary flower blossomed 
On this cursed land.
The worst of all curses,
Life,
Placed on this pitiful plant 
And a fate worse than death

Seasons flew by
And the flower withstood 
The immense force of the elements,
Debilitated by great adversity
Brought by the years 

Now with spring close by, 
If fate shall allow,
Hopefully this spring, 
This dying flower will perish. 
Its roots turned to ashes
And carried by the winds of freedom
To the promised eternal paradise

Rebirth
A garden greets my eyes
With its breath-taking beauty
And my suffering dies

Copyright © Andres Rocha | Year Posted 2013

Details | Free verse |

Season Of Shorts

The day is brrrry.
I stay inside, drive everywhere I go.
Longing for my birthday,
Groundhog's Day,
and all that comes after.
The melting, the warmer winds,
the lengthening days, 
the things that bring
the depressed spirit back to life.
Window-staring,
watching the layered, coated people
walk shivering on the sidewalk.
It's almost time.
The season of shorts will soon arrive.

1/22/2013

Copyright © Madeleine McLaughlin | Year Posted 2013

Details | Free verse |

Spring

The snow patches are seen
They are spread out everywhere
I see the brown grass that has appears
All buds on the trees ready to grow
Everything is being reborn again
This is a welcomesite to see

All the birds that flew away
Have returned from the south
Home once again rebuilding nests
For the little ones to nestle in
And they will soon be born
In the early morning dawn

The mother bird will fly
Searching for their food
Filling their bellies full Then they will sleep
To be hungry in the dawn
Chirpy loudly to be fed

That is the sign of Spring
All the birds are singing songs
It happens at the crack of dawn
What a joyu it is to hear
It is music to my ears
To the songs of all the birds
To listen to the songs of birds

Copyright © Darlene De Beaulieu | Year Posted 2017