Short Poetry by Popular Famous Poets

 Poet
1 William Wordsworth
2 Oscar Wilde
3 William Shakespeare
4 Emily Dickinson
5 Maya Angelou
6 Rabindranath Tagore
7 Robert Frost
8 Langston Hughes
9 Walt Whitman
10 Shel Silverstein
11 William Blake
12 Sylvia Plath
13 Pablo Neruda
14 Alfred Lord Tennyson
15 Rudyard Kipling
16 Edward Estlin (E E) Cummings
17 William Butler Yeats
18 Tupac Shakur
19 Sandra Cisneros
20 Alice Walker
21 Charles Bukowski
22 Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
23 Muhammad Ali
24 Sarojini Naidu
25 Christina Rossetti
26 Billy Collins
27 Carol Ann Duffy
28 Edgar Allan Poe
29 John Donne
30 John Keats
31 Nikki Giovanni
32 Ralph Waldo Emerson
33 Raymond Carver
34 Thomas Hardy
35 Ogden Nash
36 Lewis Carroll
37 Mark Twain
38 Spike Milligan
39 Anne Sexton
40 Carl Sandburg
41 Elizabeth Barrett Browning
42 Alexander Pushkin
43 Henry David Thoreau
44 Percy Bysshe Shelley
45 Victor Hugo
46 George (Lord) Byron
47 Roger McGough
48 Gary Soto
49 Sara Teasdale
50 Thunchaththu Ramanujan Ezhuthachan

Famous Short Insect Poems

Famous Short Insect Poems. Short Insect Poetry by Famous Poets. A collection of the all-time best Insect short poems

Other Short Poem Pages

Insect | Short Famous Poems and Poets

 
by Robert Burns

354. Epigram—The Toad-eater

 OF Lordly acquaintance you boast,
 And the Dukes that you dined wi’ yestreen,
Yet an insect’s an insect at most,
 Tho’ it crawl on the curl of a Queen!


by Ella Wheeler Wilcox

Earthly Pride

 How baseless is the mightiest earthly pride, 
The diamond is but charcoal purified, 
The lordliest pearl that decks a monarch’s breast
Is but an insect’s sepulchre at best.


by Emily Dickinson

Patience -- has a quiet Outer --

 Patience -- has a quiet Outer --
Patience -- Look within --
Is an Insect's futile forces
Infinites -- between --

'Scaping one -- against the other
Fruitlesser to fling --
Patience -- is the Smile's exertion
Through the quivering --


by Emily Dickinson

Death is like the insect

 Death is like the insect
Menacing the tree,
Competent to kill it,
But decoyed may be.
Bait it with the balsam, Seek it with the saw, Baffle, if it cost you Everything you are.
Then, if it have burrowed Out of reach of skill -- Wring the tree and leave it, 'Tis the vermin's will.


by Walt Whitman

Beginning my Studies

 BEGINNING my studies, the first step pleas’d me so much, 
The mere fact, consciousness—these forms—the power of motion, 
The least insect or animal—the senses—eyesight—love; 
The first step, I say, aw’d me and pleas’d me so much, 
I have hardly gone, and hardly wish’d to go, any farther,
But stop and loiter all the time, to sing it in extatic songs.


by Edgar Lee Masters

Dow Kritt

 Samuel is forever talking of his elm --
But I did not need to die to learn about roots:
I, who dug all the ditches about Spoon River.
Look at my elm! Sprung from as good a seed as his, Sown at the same time, It is dying at the top: Not from lack of life, nor fungus, Nor destroying insect, as the sexton thinks.
Look, Samuel, where the roots have struck rock, And can no further spread.
And all the while the top of the tree Is tiring itself out, and dying, Trying to grow.