Short Poetry by Popular Famous Poets

 Poet
1 William Wordsworth
2 William Shakespeare
3 Oscar Wilde
4 Emily Dickinson
5 Rabindranath Tagore
6 Maya Angelou
7 Robert Frost
8 Langston Hughes
9 Walt Whitman
10 Shel Silverstein
11 William Blake
12 Pablo Neruda
13 Rudyard Kipling
14 Sylvia Plath
15 Alfred Lord Tennyson
16 William Butler Yeats
17 Tupac Shakur
18 Edward Estlin (E E) Cummings
19 Charles Bukowski
20 Sarojini Naidu
21 Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
22 Muhammad Ali
23 Billy Collins
24 Christina Rossetti
25 Alice Walker
26 Sandra Cisneros
27 Ogden Nash
28 Carol Ann Duffy
29 John Donne
30 Edgar Allan Poe
31 Ralph Waldo Emerson
32 Raymond Carver
33 Nikki Giovanni
34 John Keats
35 Lewis Carroll
36 Spike Milligan
37 Thomas Hardy
38 Thunchaththu Ramanujan Ezhuthachan
39 Mark Twain
40 Carl Sandburg
41 Percy Bysshe Shelley
42 Anne Sexton
43 Alexander Pushkin
44 Henry David Thoreau
45 Roger McGough
46 Wendell Berry
47 Sara Teasdale
48 Victor Hugo
49 Elizabeth Barrett Browning
50 George (Lord) Byron

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Famous Short Fairy Poems

Famous Short Fairy Poems. Short Fairy Poetry by Famous Poets. A collection of the all-time best Fairy short poems

Other Short Poem Pages


Poems are below...


Fairy | Short Famous Poems and Poets

 
by William Shakespeare

A Fairy Song

 Over hill, over dale,
Thorough bush, thorough brier,
Over park, over pale,
Thorough flood, thorough fire!
I do wander everywhere,
Swifter than the moon's sphere;
And I serve the Fairy Queen,
To dew her orbs upon the green;
The cowslips tall her pensioners be;
In their gold coats spots you see;
Those be rubies, fairy favours;
In those freckles live their savours;
I must go seek some dewdrops here,
And hang a pearl in every cowslip's ear.


by Tupac Shakur

When Ure Hero Falls

when your hero falls from grace
all fairy tales r uncovered
myths exposed and pain magnified
the greatest pain discovered
u taught me 2 be strong
but im confused 2 c u so weak
u said never 2 give up
and it hurts 2 c u welcome defeat

when ure hero falls so do the stars
and so does the perception of tomorrow
without my hero there is only
me alone 2 deal with my sorrow
your heart ceases 2 work
and your soul is not happy at all
what r u expected 2 do
when ure only hero falls


by William Shakespeare

Fairy Land iv

 WHERE the bee sucks, there suck I: 
In a cowslip's bell I lie; 
There I couch when owls do cry.
On the bat's back I do fly After summer merrily: Merrily, merrily, shall I live now, Under the blossom that hangs on the bough.


by William Shakespeare

Fairy Land v

 FULL fathom five thy father lies; 
Of his bones are coral made; 
Those are pearls that were his eyes: 
 Nothing of him that doth fade, 
But doth suffer a sea-change 
Into something rich and strange.
Sea-nymphs hourly ring his knell: Ding-dong.
Hark! now I hear them-- Ding-dong, bell!


by William Shakespeare

Fairy Land iii

 COME unto these yellow sands, 
 And then take hands: 
Court'sied when you have, and kiss'd,-- 
 The wild waves whist,-- 
Foot it featly here and there; 
And, sweet sprites, the burthen bear.
Hark, hark! Bow, wow, The watch-dogs bark: Bow, wow.
Hark, hark! I hear The strain of strutting chanticleer Cry, Cock-a-diddle-dow!


by Robert Graves

Id Love To Be A Fairys Child

 Children born of fairy stock
Never need for shirt or frock,
Never want for food or fire,
Always get their hearts desire:
Jingle pockets full of gold,
Marry when they're seven years old.
Every fairy child may keep Two ponies and ten sheep; All have houses, each his own, Built of brick or granite stone; They live on cherries, they run wild-- I'd love to be a Fairy's child.


by Sarojini Naidu

Cradle Song

 FROM groves of spice, 
O'er fields of rice, 
Athwart the lotus-stream, 
I bring for you, 
Aglint with dew 
A little lovely dream.
Sweet, shut your eyes, The wild fire-fiies Dance through the fairy neem; From the poppy-bole For you I stole A little lovely dream.
Dear eyes, good-night, In golden light The stars around you gleam; On you I press With soft caress A little lovely dream.


by Amir Khosrow

She wears a round skirt

She wears a round skirt, stands on one leg,
That lady has eight legs,
and looks like a fairy.
Everyone wants her, Muslim, Hindu, Chhatri (of warrior caste).
Khosrow asks this riddle, just think about it.


by Yosa Buson

Dawn

 STILL as the holy of holies breathes the vast,
Within its crystal depths the stars grow dim;
Fire on the altar of the hills at last
 Burns on the shadowy rim.
Moment that holds all moments; white upon The verge it trembles; then like mists of flowers Break from the fairy fountain of the dawn The hues of many hours.
Thrown downward from that high companionship Of dreaming inmost heart with inmost heart, Into the common daily ways I slip My fire from theirs apart.


by Thomas Hood

A Lake And A Fairy Boat

 A lake and a fairy boat
To sail in the moonlight clear, -
And merrily we would float
From the dragons that watch us here! 

Thy gown should be snow-white silk
And strings of oriental pearls,
Like gossamers dipped in milk,
Should twine with thy raven curls! 

Red rubies should deck thy hands,
And diamonds should be thy dower -
But fairies have broke their wands,
And wishing has lost its power!


by Sarojini Naidu

To My Fairy Fancies

 NAY, no longer I may hold you, 
In my spirit's soft caresses, 
Nor like lotus-leaves enfold you 
In the tangles of my tresses.
Fairy fancies, fly away To the white cloud-wildernesses, Fly away! Nay, no longer ye may linger With your laughter-lighted faces, Now I am a thought-worn singer In life's high and lonely places.
Fairy fancies, fly away, To bright wind-inwoven spaces, Fly away!


by Robert Louis Stevenson

Fairy Bread

 Come up here, O dusty feet!
Here is fairy ready to eat.
Here in my retiring room, Children ,you may dine On the golden smell of broom And the shade of pine; And when you have eaten well, Fairy stories hear and tell.


by Robert Desnos

Fairy Tale

 Many times upon a time
There was a man who loved a woman.
Many times upon a time There was a woman who loved a man.
Many times upon a time There was a man and there was a woman Who did not love the ones who loved them.
Once upon a time Perhaps only once A man and a woman who loved each other.


by Emily Dickinson

As Sleigh Bells seem in summer

 As Sleigh Bells seem in summer
Or Bees, at Christmas show --
So fairy -- so fictitious
The individuals do
Repealed from observation --
A Party that we knew --
More distant in an instant
Than Dawn in Timbuctoo.


by Elinor Wylie

Escape

 When foxes eat the last gold grape, 
And the last white antelope is killed, 
I shall stop fighting and escape 
Into a little house I'll build.
But first I'll shrink to fairy size, With a whisper no one understands, Making blind moons of all your eyes, And muddy roads of all your hands.
And you may grope for me in vain In hollows under the mangrove root, Or where, in apple-scented rain, The silver wasp-nests hang like fruit.


by Robert William Service

Aspiration

 When I was daft (as urchins are),
And full if fairy lore,
I aimed an arrow at a star
And hit - the barnyard door.
I've shot at heaps of stars since then, but always it's the same - A barnyard door has mocked me when Uranus was my aim.
So, I'll shoot starward as of yore, Though wide my arrows fall; I'd rather hit a big barn door Then never aim at all.


by Emily Dickinson

Would you like summer? Taste of ours

 Would you like summer? Taste of ours.
Spices? Buy here! Ill! We have berries, for the parching! Weary! Furloughs of down! Perplexed! Estates of violet trouble ne'er looked on! Captive! We bring reprieve of roses! Fainting! Flasks of air! Even for Death, a fairy medicine.
But, which is it, sir?


by Emily Dickinson

Theres something quieter than sleep

 There's something quieter than sleep
Within this inner room!
It wears a sprig upon its breast --
And will not tell its name.
Some touch it, and some kiss it -- Some chafe its idle hand -- It has a simple gravity I do not understand! I would not weep if I were they -- How rude in one to sob! Might scare the quiet fairy Back to her native wood! While simple-hearted neighbors Chat of the "Early dead" -- We -- prone to periphrasis Remark that Birds have fled!


by Gerard Manley Hopkins

What Being in Rank-Old Nature

 What being in rank-old nature should earlier have that breath been
That h?re p?rsonal tells off these heart-song powerful peals?— 
A bush-browed, beetle-br?wed b?llow is it? 
With a so?th-w?sterly w?nd bl?stering, with a tide rolls reels 
Of crumbling, fore-foundering, thundering all-surfy seas in; seen
?nderneath, their glassy barrel, of a fairy green.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
Or a jaunting vaunting vaulting assaulting trumpet telling


by Henry Van Dyke

Hesper

 Her eyes are like the evening air,
Her voice is like a rose,
Her lips are like a lovely song,
That ripples as it flows,
And she herself is sweeter than
The sweetest thing she knows.
A slender, haunting, twilight form Of wonder and surprise, She seemed a fairy or a child, Till, deep within her eyes, I saw the homeward-leading star Of womanhood arise.


by Edna St Vincent Millay

Doubt No More That Oberon

 Doubt no more that Oberon—
Never doubt that Pan
Lived, and played a reed, and ran
After nymphs in a dark forest,
In the merry, credulous days,—
Lived, and led a fairy band
Over the indulgent land!
Ah, for in this dourest, sorest
Age man's eye has looked upon,
Death to fauns and death to fays,
Still the dog-wood dares to raise—
Healthy tree, with trunk and root—
Ivory bowls that bear no fruit,
And the starlings and the jays—
Birds that cannot even sing—
Dare to come again in spring!


by Katherine Mansfield

The Opal Dream Cave

 In an opal dream cave I found a fairy:
Her wings were frailer than flower petals,
Frailer far than snowflakes.
She was not frightened, but poised on my finger, Then delicately walked into my hand.
I shut the two palms of my hands together And held her prisoner.
I carried her out of the opal cave, Then opened my hands.
First she became thistledown, Then a mote in a sunbeam, Then--nothing at all.
Empty now is my opal dream cave.


by Edna St Vincent Millay

Witch-Wife

 She is neither pink nor pale,
 And she never will be all mine;
She learned her hands in a fairy-tale,
 And her mouth on a valentine.
She has more hair than she needs; In the sun 'tis a woe to me! And her voice is a string of coloured beads, Or steps leading into the sea.
She loves me all that she can, And her ways to my ways resign; But she was not made for any man, And she never will be all mine.


by Vachel Lindsay

The Sun Says His Prayers

 "The sun says his prayers," said the fairy,
Or else he would wither and die.
"The sun says his prayers," said the fairy, "For strength to climb up through the sky.
He leans on invisible angels, And Faith is his prop and his rod.
The sky is his crystal cathedral.
And dawn is his altar to God.
"


by Robert Burns

436. Song—Deluded swain the pleasure

 DELUDED swain, the pleasure
 The fickle Fair can give thee,
Is but a fairy treasure,
 Thy hopes will soon deceive thee:
The billows on the ocean,
 The breezes idly roaming,
The cloud’s uncertain motion,
 They are but types of Woman.
O art thou not asham’d To doat upon a feature? If Man thou wouldst be nam’d, Despise the silly creature.
Go, find an honest fellow, Good claret set before thee, Hold on till thou art mellow, And then to bed in glory!