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Best Famous Wilfred Owen Poems

Here is a collection of the all-time best famous Wilfred Owen poems. This is a select list of the best famous Wilfred Owen poetry. Reading, writing, and enjoying famous Wilfred Owen poetry (as well as classical and contemporary poems) is a great past time. These top poems are the best examples of Wilfred Owen poems.

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12
Written by Wilfred Owen | Create an image from this poem

Insensibility

 I

Happy are men who yet before they are killed
Can let their veins run cold.
Whom no compassion fleers Or makes their feet Sore on the alleys cobbled with their brothers.
The front line withers, But they are troops who fade, not flowers For poets' tearful fooling: Men, gaps for filling Losses who might have fought Longer; but no one bothers.
II And some cease feeling Even themselves or for themselves.
Dullness best solves The tease and doubt of shelling, And Chance's strange arithmetic Comes simpler than the reckoning of their shilling.
They keep no check on Armies' decimation.
III Happy are these who lose imagination: They have enough to carry with ammunition.
Their spirit drags no pack.
Their old wounds save with cold can not more ache.
Having seen all things red, Their eyes are rid Of the hurt of the colour of blood for ever.
And terror's first constriction over, Their hearts remain small drawn.
Their senses in some scorching cautery of battle Now long since ironed, Can laugh among the dying, unconcerned.
IV Happy the soldier home, with not a notion How somewhere, every dawn, some men attack, And many sighs are drained.
Happy the lad whose mind was never trained: His days are worth forgetting more than not.
He sings along the march Which we march taciturn, because of dusk, The long, forlorn, relentless trend From larger day to huger night.
V We wise, who with a thought besmirch Blood over all our soul, How should we see our task But through his blunt and lashless eyes? Alive, he is not vital overmuch; Dying, not mortal overmuch; Nor sad, nor proud, Nor curious at all.
He cannot tell Old men's placidity from his.
VI But cursed are dullards whom no cannon stuns, That they should be as stones.
Wretched are they, and mean With paucity that never was simplicity.
By choice they made themselves immune To pity and whatever mourns in man Before the last sea and the hapless stars; Whatever mourns when many leave these shores; Whatever shares The eternal reciprocity of tears.
Written by Wilfred Owen | Create an image from this poem

Smile Smile Smile

 Head to limp head, the sunk-eyed wounded scanned
Yesterday's Mail; the casualties (typed small)
And (large) Vast Booty from our Latest Haul.
Also, they read of Cheap Homes, not yet planned; For, said the paper, "When this war is done The men's first instinct will be making homes.
Meanwhile their foremost need is aerodromes, It being certain war has just begun.
Peace would do wrong to our undying dead, -- The sons we offered might regret they died If we got nothing lasting in their stead.
We must be solidly indemnified.
Though all be worthy Victory which all bought, We rulers sitting in this ancient spot Would wrong our very selves if we forgot The greatest glory will be theirs who fought, Who kept this nation in integrity.
" Nation? -- The half-limbed readers did not chafe But smiled at one another curiously Like secret men who know their secret safe.
This is the thing they know and never speak, That England one by one had fled to France (Not many elsewhere now save under France).
Pictures of these broad smiles appear each week, And people in whose voice real feeling rings Say: How they smile! They're happy now, poor things.
23rd September 1918.
Written by Wilfred Owen | Create an image from this poem

The Young Soldier

 It is not death
Without hereafter
To one in dearth
Of life and its laughter,

Nor the sweet murder
Dealt slow and even
Unto the martyr
Smiling at heaven:

It is the smile
Faint as a (waning) myth,
Faint, and exceeding small
On a boy's murdered mouth.
Written by Wilfred Owen | Create an image from this poem

Winter Song

 The browns, the olives, and the yellows died,
And were swept up to heaven; where they glowed
Each dawn and set of sun till Christmastide,
And when the land lay pale for them, pale-snowed,
Fell back, and down the snow-drifts flamed and flowed.
From off your face, into the winds of winter, The sun-brown and the summer-gold are blowing; But they shall gleam with spiritual glinter, When paler beauty on your brows falls snowing, And through those snows my looks shall be soft-going.
Written by Wilfred Owen | Create an image from this poem

Mental Cases

 Who are these? Why sit they here in twilight?
Wherefore rock they, purgatorial shadows,
Drooping tongues from jaws that slob their relish,
Baring teeth that leer like skulls' tongues wicked?
Stroke on stroke of pain, -- but what slow panic,
Gouged these chasms round their fretted sockets?
Ever from their hair and through their hand palms
Misery swelters.
Surely we have perished Sleeping, and walk hell; but who these hellish? -- These are men whose minds the Dead have ravished.
Memory fingers in their hair of murders, Multitudinous murders they once witnessed.
Wading sloughs of flesh these helpless wander, Treading blood from lungs that had loved laughter.
Always they must see these things and hear them, Batter of guns and shatter of flying muscles, Carnage incomparable and human squander Rucked too thick for these men's extrication.
Therefore still their eyeballs shrink tormented Back into their brains, because on their sense Sunlight seems a bloodsmear; night comes blood-black; Dawn breaks open like a wound that bleeds afresh -- Thus their heads wear this hilarious, hideous, Awful falseness of set-smiling corpses.
-- Thus their hands are plucking at each other; Picking at the rope-knouts of their scourging; Snatching after us who smote them, brother, Pawing us who dealt them war and madness.
Written by Wilfred Owen | Create an image from this poem

A Terre

 (Being the philosophy of many Soldiers.
) Sit on the bed; I'm blind, and three parts shell, Be careful; can't shake hands now; never shall.
Both arms have mutinied against me -- brutes.
My fingers fidget like ten idle brats.
I tried to peg out soldierly -- no use! One dies of war like any old disease.
This bandage feels like pennies on my eyes.
I have my medals? -- Discs to make eyes close.
My glorious ribbons? -- Ripped from my own back In scarlet shreds.
(That's for your poetry book.
) A short life and a merry one, my brick! We used to say we'd hate to live dead old, -- Yet now .
.
.
I'd willingly be puffy, bald, And patriotic.
Buffers catch from boys At least the jokes hurled at them.
I suppose Little I'd ever teach a son, but hitting, Shooting, war, hunting, all the arts of hurting.
Well, that's what I learnt, -- that, and making money.
Your fifty years ahead seem none too many? Tell me how long I've got? God! For one year To help myself to nothing more than air! One Spring! Is one too good to spare, too long? Spring wind would work its own way to my lung, And grow me legs as quick as lilac-shoots.
My servant's lamed, but listen how he shouts! When I'm lugged out, he'll still be good for that.
Here in this mummy-case, you know, I've thought How well I might have swept his floors for ever, I'd ask no night off when the bustle's over, Enjoying so the dirt.
Who's prejudiced Against a grimed hand when his own's quite dust, Less live than specks that in the sun-shafts turn, Less warm than dust that mixes with arms' tan? I'd love to be a sweep, now, black as Town, Yes, or a muckman.
Must I be his load? O Life, Life, let me breathe, -- a dug-out rat! Not worse than ours the existences rats lead -- Nosing along at night down some safe vat, They find a shell-proof home before they rot.
Dead men may envy living mites in cheese, Or good germs even.
Microbes have their joys, And subdivide, and never come to death, Certainly flowers have the easiest time on earth.
"I shall be one with nature, herb, and stone.
" Shelley would tell me.
Shelley would be stunned; The dullest Tommy hugs that fancy now.
"Pushing up daisies," is their creed, you know.
To grain, then, go my fat, to buds my sap, For all the usefulness there is in soap.
D'you think the Boche will ever stew man-soup? Some day, no doubt, if .
.
.
Friend, be very sure I shall be better off with plants that share More peaceably the meadow and the shower.
Soft rains will touch me, -- as they could touch once, And nothing but the sun shall make me ware.
Your guns may crash around me.
I'll not hear; Or, if I wince, I shall not know I wince.
Don't take my soul's poor comfort for your jest.
Soldiers may grow a soul when turned to fronds, But here the thing's best left at home with friends.
My soul's a little grief, grappling your chest, To climb your throat on sobs; easily chased On other sighs and wiped by fresher winds.
Carry my crying spirit till it's weaned To do without what blood remained these wounds.
Written by Wilfred Owen | Create an image from this poem

Dulce Et Decorum Est

 Bent double, like old beggars under sacks,
Knock-kneed, coughing like hags, we cursed through sludge,
Till on the haunting flares we turned our backs
And towards our distant rest began to trudge.
Men marched asleep.
Many had lost their boots But limped on, blood-shod.
All went lame; all blind; Drunk with fatigue; deaf even to the hoots Of tired, outstripped Five-Nines that dropped behind.
Gas! GAS! Quick, boys!--An ecstasy of fumbling Fitting the clumsy helmets just in time; But someone still was yelling out and stumbling, And flound'ring like a man in fire or lime.
.
.
Dim, through the misty panes and thick green light, As under a green sea, I saw him drowning.
In all my dreams, before my helpless sight, He plunges at me, guttering, choking, drowning.
If in some smothering dreams you too could pace Behind the wagon that we flung him in, And watch the white eyes writhing in his face, His hanging face, like a devil's sick of sin; If you could hear, at every jolt, the blood Come gargling from the froth-corrupted lungs Obscene as cancer, bitter as the cud Of vile, incurable sores on innocent tongues,-- My friend, you would not tell with such high zest To children ardent for some desperate glory, The old Lie: Dulce et decorum est Pro patria mori.
Written by Wilfred Owen | Create an image from this poem

Disabled

 He sat in a wheeled chair, waiting for dark,
And shivered in his ghastly suit of grey,
Legless, sewn short at elbow.
Through the park Voices of boys rang saddening like a hymn, Voices of play and pleasure after day, Till gathering sleep had mothered them from him.
About this time Town used to swing so gay When glow-lamps budded in the light-blue trees And girls glanced lovelier as the air grew dim, -- In the old times, before he threw away his knees.
Now he will never feel again how slim Girls' waists are, or how warm their subtle hands, All of them touch him like some queer disease.
There was an artist silly for his face, For it was younger than his youth, last year.
Now he is old; his back will never brace; He's lost his colour very far from here, Poured it down shell-holes till the veins ran dry, And half his lifetime lapsed in the hot race, And leap of purple spurted from his thigh.
One time he liked a bloodsmear down his leg, After the matches carried shoulder-high.
It was after football, when he'd drunk a peg, He thought he'd better join.
He wonders why .
.
.
Someone had said he'd look a god in kilts.
That's why; and maybe, too, to please his Meg, Aye, that was it, to please the giddy jilts, He asked to join.
He didn't have to beg; Smiling they wrote his lie; aged nineteen years.
Germans he scarcely thought of; and no fears Of Fear came yet.
He thought of jewelled hilts For daggers in plaid socks; of smart salutes; And care of arms; and leave; and pay arrears; Esprit de corps; and hints for young recruits.
And soon, he was drafted out with drums and cheers.
Some cheered him home, but not as crowds cheer Goal.
Only a solemn man who brought him fruits Thanked him; and then inquired about his soul.
Now, he will spend a few sick years in Institutes, And do what things the rules consider wise, And take whatever pity they may dole.
To-night he noticed how the women's eyes Passed from him to the strong men that were whole.
How cold and late it is! Why don't they come And put him into bed? Why don't they come?
Written by Wilfred Owen | Create an image from this poem

Apologia Pro Poemate Meo

 I, too, saw God through mud --
 The mud that cracked on cheeks when wretches smiled.
War brought more glory to their eyes than blood, And gave their laughs more glee than shakes a child.
Merry it was to laugh there -- Where death becomes absurd and life absurder.
For power was on us as we slashed bones bare Not to feel sickness or remorse of murder.
I, too, have dropped off fear -- Behind the barrage, dead as my platoon, And sailed my spirit surging, light and clear Past the entanglement where hopes lay strewn; And witnessed exultation -- Faces that used to curse me, scowl for scowl, Shine and lift up with passion of oblation, Seraphic for an hour; though they were foul.
I have made fellowships -- Untold of happy lovers in old song.
For love is not the binding of fair lips With the soft silk of eyes that look and long, By Joy, whose ribbon slips, -- But wound with war's hard wire whose stakes are strong; Bound with the bandage of the arm that drips; Knit in the welding of the rifle-thong.
I have perceived much beauty In the hoarse oaths that kept our courage straight; Heard music in the silentness of duty; Found peace where shell-storms spouted reddest spate.
Nevertheless, except you share With them in hell the sorrowful dark of hell, Whose world is but the trembling of a flare, And heaven but as the highway for a shell, You shall not hear their mirth: You shall not come to think them well content By any jest of mine.
These men are worth Your tears: You are not worth their merriment.
November 1917.
Written by Wilfred Owen | Create an image from this poem

The End

 After the blast of lightning from the east,
The flourish of loud clouds, the Chariot throne,
After the drums of time have rolled and ceased
And from the bronze west long retreat is blown,

Shall Life renew these bodies? Of a truth
All death will he annul, all tears assuage?
Or fill these void veins full again with youth
And wash with an immortal water age?

When I do ask white Age, he saith not so, --
"My head hangs weighed with snow.
" And when I hearken to the Earth she saith My fiery heart sinks aching.
It is death.
Mine ancient scars shall not be glorified Nor my titanic tears the seas be dried.
"
12