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Best Famous Edith Wharton Poems

Here is a collection of the all-time best famous Edith Wharton poems. This is a select list of the best famous Edith Wharton poetry. Reading, writing, and enjoying famous Edith Wharton poetry (as well as classical and contemporary poems) is a great past time. These top poems are the best examples of Edith Wharton poems.

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Written by Edith Wharton | Create an image from this poem

An Autumn Sunset

 I

Leaguered in fire
The wild black promontories of the coast extend
Their savage silhouettes;
The sun in universal carnage sets,
And, halting higher,
The motionless storm-clouds mass their sullen threats,
Like an advancing mob in sword-points penned,
That, balked, yet stands at bay.
Mid-zenith hangs the fascinated day In wind-lustrated hollows crystalline, A wan Valkyrie whose wide pinions shine Across the ensanguined ruins of the fray, And in her hand swings high o'erhead, Above the waste of war, The silver torch-light of the evening star Wherewith to search the faces of the dead.
II Lagooned in gold, Seem not those jetty promontories rather The outposts of some ancient land forlorn, Uncomforted of morn, Where old oblivions gather, The melancholy unconsoling fold Of all things that go utterly to death And mix no more, no more With life's perpetually awakening breath? Shall Time not ferry me to such a shore, Over such sailless seas, To walk with hope's slain importunities In miserable marriage? Nay, shall not All things be there forgot, Save the sea's golden barrier and the black Close-crouching promontories? Dead to all shames, forgotten of all glories, Shall I not wander there, a shadow's shade, A spectre self-destroyed, So purged of all remembrance and sucked back Into the primal void, That should we on that shore phantasmal meet I should not know the coming of your feet?
Written by Edith Wharton | Create an image from this poem

Chartres

 I

Immense, august, like some Titanic bloom,
 The mighty choir unfolds its lithic core,
Petalled with panes of azure, gules and or,
 Splendidly lambent in the Gothic gloom,
And stamened with keen flamelets that illume
 The pale high-alter.
On the prayer-worn floor, By worshippers innumerous thronged of yore, A few brown crones, familiars of the tomb, The stranded driftwood of Faith's ebbing sea-- For these alone the finials fret the skies, The topmost bosses shake their blossoms free, While from the triple portals, with grave eyes, Tranquil, and fixed upon eternity, The cloud of witnesses still testifies.
II The crimson panes like blood-drops stigmatise The western floor.
The aisles are mute and cold.
A rigid fetich in her robe of gold, The Virgin of the Pillar, with blank eyes, Enthroned beneath her votive canopies, Gathers a meagre remnant to her fold.
The rest is solitude; the church, grown old, Stands stark and grey beneath the burning skies.
Well-nigh again its mighty framework grows To be a part of nature's self, withdrawn From hot humanity's impatient woes; The floor is ridged like some rude mountain lawn, And in the east one giant window shows The roseate coldness of an Alp at dawn.