Poetry Forum Areas

Introduce Yourself

New to PoetrySoup? Introduce yourself here. Tell us something about yourself.

Looking for a Poem

Can't find a poem you've read before? Looking for a poem for a special person or an occasion? Ask other member for help.

Writing Poetry

Ways to improve your poetry. Post your techniques, tips, and creative ideas how to write better.

High Critique

For poets who want unrestricted constructive criticism. This is NOT a vanity workshop. If you do not want your poem seriously critiqued, do not post here. Constructive criticism only. PLEASE Only Post One Poem a Day!!!

How do I...?

Ask PoetrySoup Members how to do something or find something on PoetrySoup.


You have an ad blocker! We understand, but...

PoetrySoup is a small privately owned website. Our means of support comes from advertising revenue. We want to keep PoetrySoup alive, make it better, and keep it free. Please support us by disabling your ad blocker on PoetrySoup. See how to enable ads while keeping your ad blocker active. Also, did you know you can become a PoetrySoup Lifetime Premium Member and block ads forever...while getting many more great features. Take a look! Thank you!

Greedy Richard

by
 "I think I want some pies this morning," 
Said Dick, stretching himself and yawning; 
So down he threw his slate and books,
And saunter'd to the pastry-cook's.
And there he cast his greedy eyes Round on the jellies and the pies, So to select, with anxious care, The very nicest that was there.
At last the point was thus decided: As his opinion was divided 'Twixt pie and jelly, being loth Either to leave, he took them both.
Now Richard never could be pleased To stop when hunger was appeased, But would go on to eat still more When he had had an ample store.
"No, not another now," said Dick; "Dear me, I feel extremely sick: I cannot even eat this bit; I wish I had not tasted it.
" Then slowing rising from his seat, He threw his cheesecake in the street, And left the tempting pastry-cook's With very discontented looks.
Just then a man with wooden leg Met Dick, and held his hat to beg; And while he told his mournful case, Look'd at him with imploring face.
Dick, wishing to relieve his pain, His pockets search'd, but search'd in vain; And so at last he did declare, He had not left a farthing there.
The beggar turn'd with face of grief, And look of patient unbelief, While Richard now his folly blamed, And felt both sorry and ashamed.
"I wish," said he (but wishing's vain), "I had my money back again, And had not spent my last, to pay For what I only threw away.
"Another time, I'll take advice, And not buy things because they're nice; But rather save my little store, To give to those who want it more.
"

Poem by
Biography | Poems | Best Poems | Short Poems | Quotes | Email Poem - Greedy RichardEmail Poem | Create an image from this poem

Poems are below...


Top Jane Taylor Poems

Analysis and Comments on Greedy Richard

Provide your analysis, explanation, meaning, interpretation, and comments on the poem Greedy Richard here.