Submit a Poem
Get Your Premium Membership
spacer

Debbie Guzzi's Blog

About Debbie Guzzi
(Show Details...)
Bloggers Photo

Deborah Guzzi travels for inspiration: China, Nepal [during the civil war], Japan, Egypt [two weeks before ‘The Arab Spring’], and most recently Peru. First published at the age of sixteen, she writes articles for Massage and Aroma Therapy Magazines. Her poetry has been accepted in the Literary Journals of Western CT. University, Inclement Magazine, Pyrokinections, Jellyfish Whispers, Grey Wolf’s Summer Legends Anthology, The Germ, Wilderness Literary Review, The Anthology Sweet Dreams & Night Terrors, Bitterzoet Magazine, haiku journal, Contemporary Haibun Online, Bella on line, The Autumn Sound, Eskimo Pie, and Ribbons, The Inwood Indiana Review, Five Poetry, Tanka Society of America Journal, and 50 haiku. She has published two illustrated volumes of poetry, The Healing Heart and Heaven and Hell in a Nutshell.


 

Most Recent Blog Post


The Highwayman
Blog Posted:12/10/2012 1:45:00 PM

 

Here is another fav poem of mine from the past. This verse was put to music by  Loreena McKennitt. I always thought it was a ballad but now I'm not sure..maybe a  Ballade? Anyone? What form would you say this is? This is the line layout shown [I'm assumming the poet wanted it this way and not in Quatraines.
Poet: Alfred Noyes
Alfred Noyes CBE was an English poet, best known for his ballads, "The Highwayman" and "The Barrel-Organ". Wikipedia



The Highwayman

                                          PART ONE

                                                 I

    THE wind was a torrent of darkness among the gusty trees,
    The moon was a ghostly galleon tossed upon cloudy seas,
    The road was a ribbon of moonlight over the purple moor,
    And the highwayman came riding—
Riding—riding—
The highwayman came riding, up to the old inn-door.

                                                 II

    He'd a French cocked-hat on his forehead, a bunch of lace at his chin,
    A coat of the claret velvet, and breeches of brown doe-skin;
    They fitted with never a wrinkle: his boots were up to the thigh!
    And he rode with a jewelled twinkle,
                      His pistol butts a-twinkle,
    His rapier hilt a-twinkle, under the jewelled sky.

                                                 III

    Over the cobbles he clattered and clashed in the dark inn-yard,
    And he tapped with his whip on the shutters, but all was locked and barred;
    He whistled a tune to the window, and who should be waiting there
    But the landlord's black-eyed daughter,
                      Bess, the landlord's daughter,
    Plaiting a dark red love-knot into her long black hair.

                                                 IV

    And dark in the dark old inn-yard a stable-wicket creaked
    Where Tim the ostler listened; his face was white and peaked;
    His eyes were hollows of madness, his hair like mouldy hay,
    But he loved the landlord's daughter,
                      The landlord's red-lipped daughter,
    Dumb as a dog he listened, and he heard the robber say—

                                                V

    'One kiss, my bonny sweetheart, I'm after a prize to-night,
    But I shall be back with the yellow gold before the morning light;
    Yet, if they press me sharply, and harry me through the day,
    Then look for me by moonlight,
                      Watch for me by moonlight,
    I'll come to thee by moonlight, though hell should bar the way.'

                                                 VI

    He rose upright in the stirrups; he scarce could reach her hand,
    But she loosened her hair i' the casement! His face burnt like a brand
    As the black cascade of perfume came tumbling over his breast;
    And he kissed its waves in the moonlight,
                      (Oh, sweet, black waves in the moonlight!)
    Then he tugged at his rein in the moonliglt, and galloped away to the West.



                                        PART TWO

                                                 I

    He did not come in the dawning; he did not come at noon;
    And out o' the tawny sunset, before the rise o' the moon,
    When the road was a gypsy's ribbon, looping the purple moor,
    A red-coat troop came marching—
Marching—marching—
King George's men came matching, up to the old inn-door.

                                                 II

    They said no word to the landlord, they drank his ale instead,
    But they gagged his daughter and bound her to the foot of her narrow bed;
    Two of them knelt at her casement, with muskets at their side!
    There was death at every window;
                      And hell at one dark window;
    For Bess could see, through her casement, the road that he would ride.

                                                 III

    They had tied her up to attention, with many a sniggering jest;
    They had bound a musket beside her, with the barrel beneath her breast!
    'Now, keep good watch!' and they kissed her.
                      She heard the dead man say—
Look for me by moonlight;
                      Watch for me by moonlight;
    I'll come to thee by moonlight, though hell should bar the way!

                                                 IV

    She twisted her hands behind her; but all the knots held good!
    She writhed her hands till her fingers were wet with sweat or blood!
    They stretched and strained in the darkness, and the hours crawled by like years,
    Till, now, on the stroke of midnight,
                      Cold, on the stroke of midnight,
    The tip of one finger touched it! The trigger at least was hers!

                                                 V

    The tip of one finger touched it; she strove no more for the rest!
    Up, she stood up to attention, with the barrel beneath her breast,
    She would not risk their hearing; she would not strive again;
    For the road lay bare in the moonlight;
                      Blank and bare in the moonlight;
    And the blood of her veins in the moonlight throbbed to her love's refrain .

                                                 VI

        Tlot-tlot; tlot-tlot! Had they heard it? The horse-hoofs ringing clear;
    Tlot-tlot, tlot-tlot, in the distance? Were they deaf that they did not hear?
    Down the ribbon of moonlight, over the brow of the hill,
    The highwayman came riding,
                      Riding, riding!
    The red-coats looked to their priming! She stood up, straight and still!

                                                 VII

    Tlot-tlot, in the frosty silence! Tlot-tlot, in the echoing night!
    Nearer he came and nearer! Her face was like a light!
    Her eyes grew wide for a moment; she drew one last deep breath,
    Then her finger moved in the moonlight,
                      Her musket shattered the moonlight,
    Shattered her breast in the moonlight and warned him—with her death.

                                                 VIII

    He turned; he spurred to the West; he did not know who stood
    Bowed, with her head o'er the musket, drenched with her own red blood!
    Not till the dawn he heard it, his face grew grey to hear
    How Bess, the landlord's daughter,
                      The landlord's black-eyed daughter,
    Had watched for her love in the moonlight, and died in the darkness there.

                                                 IX

    Back, he spurred like a madman, shrieking a curse to the sky,
    With the white road smoking behind him and his rapier brandished high!
    Blood-red were his spurs i' the golden noon; wine-red was his velvet coat,
    When they shot him down on the highway,
                      Down like a dog on the highway,
    And he lay in his blood on the highway, with the bunch of lace at his throat.

                                                 X

    And still of a winter's night, they say, when the wind is in the trees,
    When the moon is a ghostly galleon tossed upon cloudy seas,
    When the road is a ribbon of moonlight over the purple moor,
    A highwayman comes riding—
Riding—riding—
A highwayman comes riding, up to the old inn-door.

                                                 XI

    Over the cobbles he clatters and clangs in the dark inn-yard;
    He taps with his whip on the shutters, but all is locked and barred;
    He whistles a tune to the window, and who should be waiting there
    But the landlord's black-eyed daughter,
                      Bess, the landlord's daughter,
    Plaiting a dark red love-knot into her long black hair.




Please Login to post a comment
 
  1. Date: 12/14/2012 10:13:00 AM
    Hi Debbie. I'm seeing this great poem for the first time (shame on me)... thanks for bringing it to my (our?) attention... Happy Holidays... Terry

    Login to Reply
  1. Date: 12/11/2012 7:14:00 AM
    Hey Mr. O Hannukak [so many dif spellings!] is still rolling aloneOnly 4 of the 6 of us were with Dad this year. He has a Christmas tree too, for his gal is Christian and we always had one since my Mom was Christian [Protestant]. Dad married 3 Christians and all 3 converted? yup..not bad for a faith non-missionary faith! LOL

    Login to Reply
  1. Date: 12/11/2012 7:11:00 AM
    Wow Craig I should look for these books! I have been to Nova Scotia but I'm not sure about Prince Edward's..you know I did read a book SO long ago about Greengables but I don't remember Anne? funny huh?

    Login to Reply
  1. Date: 12/10/2012 8:52:00 PM
    Hello, gorgeous! I just want to wish you: Happy Hanukkah!!! All the best! Ruben.

    Login to Reply
  1. Date: 12/10/2012 6:31:00 PM
    Deb, The PBS original PBS special aired back in 1985-85 starring Megan Follows--think I know you enough to say you would love it!! It was followed up (no pun) with Anne of Avonlea--right down your alley--you'll want to adopt her and the story--been to her house on Prince Edward Island--awesome!!

    Login to Reply
  1. Date: 12/10/2012 6:15:00 PM
    No Craig..I don't think I ever read Ann of green Gables there was a PBS special on the book recently saying in Japan it is still SO popular..do you have a copy?

    Login to Reply
  1. Date: 12/10/2012 4:04:00 PM
    Awesome, and a favorite performance poem--remember the Ann of Green Gables reading!

    Login to Reply
  1. Date: 12/10/2012 1:52:00 PM
    I would love to be able to memorize and sing this! Boy we have similiar taste Jack!

    Login to Reply
  1. Date: 12/10/2012 1:47:00 PM
    this one has always been a favourite of mine too, Debs - just love it

    Login to Reply

My Past Blog Posts

 
Andrea Dietrich, Joanne Grisetti, Susan Burch
Date Posted: 4/14/2014 9:17:00 AM
A Ghost Hunt by Jack Horne
Date Posted: 4/9/2014 5:32:00 PM
Intro to a VERY Friendly Publisher
Date Posted: 4/6/2014 5:17:00 PM
Thoughts on Faith
Date Posted: 3/29/2014 7:07:00 PM
God, Spring, Resurrection & Reincarnation
Date Posted: 3/21/2014 7:49:00 PM
What did you look like at Five?
Date Posted: 3/12/2014 9:00:00 PM
Writing, Writing, Writing
Date Posted: 3/6/2014 2:02:00 PM
Susan Burch [Black Eyed Susan]
Date Posted: 2/28/2014 12:24:00 PM
Five MONTHLY Poetry Magazine
Date Posted: 2/26/2014 2:21:00 PM
Haibun
Date Posted: 2/11/2014 10:41:00 AM
The Crown Polished
Date Posted: 2/6/2014 6:24:00 PM
The LAST Jewel in the Crown the 7th Sonnet
Date Posted: 2/5/2014 10:16:00 AM
6th Jewel in the Crown
Date Posted: 2/4/2014 9:14:00 AM
6 th Sonnet Crown
Date Posted: 1/31/2014 3:45:00 PM
Onward to the Fourth Jewel in the Crown
Date Posted: 1/28/2014 3:23:00 PM
Contest by Invitation Only
Date Posted: 1/21/2014 8:50:00 PM
How BIG Do I Have to Put IT
Date Posted: 1/20/2014 6:34:00 PM
Congradulations to Yasmin Kahn & Joan Gresetti
Date Posted: 1/13/2014 7:56:00 PM
20 Best Positions in Bed [OK for all ages ;)]
Date Posted: 1/12/2014 10:18:00 AM
Pretty Please With Sugar
Date Posted: 1/7/2014 12:45:00 PM
Will you Play with Me
Date Posted: 1/5/2014 7:54:00 AM
Poets of Faith
Date Posted: 1/3/2014 10:24:00 AM
Chinese New Year & Poetry
Date Posted: 1/1/2014 5:08:00 PM
Take a Break
Date Posted: 12/31/2013 6:36:00 PM
What Do Editors Expect from a Title
Date Posted: 12/29/2013 7:57:00 PM

My Poems

12345678
Date PostedPoem TitleFormCategories
4/17/2014Wolf PactsSonnetpolitical,pollution,pover
4/17/2014Thread TimeVerseuplifting,
4/16/2014Itty Bitty SpringTankanature,
4/16/2014Wind BornFree versedream,
4/12/2014Crest FallenVersecolor,
4/8/2014Skin DeepFree versemagic,
4/7/2014Dark And Mystical Versenight,
4/5/2014Tick Tock - Itty BittyFree verseage,funny,
4/4/2014Sweety PeepsVersecandy,child,
4/2/2014Trash Talkin'Free versepoems,
4/1/2014The Handy ManLimerickfunny,funny love,
3/28/2014 March GoosebumpsSonnetspring,wind,
3/23/2014St Catherine's WheelFree versesky,
3/19/2014He Crowed the NightFree versenight,
3/15/2014Memories on the BranchRhymeseasons,
3/14/2014Crotches and ScotchesLimerickfunny,
3/13/2014Pushing the EnvelopeFree versespring,
3/13/2014TruthLimerickfunny,
3/7/2014Life is What You Make ItSonnetloss,
2/28/2014Dewberry CobblerHaibungrowing up,
2/24/2014Remember Kent StateFree versewar,
2/22/2014What's White Got to Do With ItRhymenostalgia,parody,
2/21/2014The Naughty BoyQuatraincare,
2/21/2014Dumb BroadAcrosticlost love,
2/9/2014Corpus delictiCrown of Sonnetsaddiction,family,grief,lo
12345678

My Photos


Fav Poems

1234
Poem TitleFormCategories
GodFree verselife,mystery,
Hard TimesCowboycowboy-western,family,fun
For Things Once CountedRhymeintrospection,loss,uplift
PetalVerselove,
Defender of the WastesFree verseart,life,parody,world,
BirthImagismchildhood,life
this is why i woo wordsVerseart,inspirational,philoso
ForbearFree versesad,
BelongingsRhymeloss,love,mother,peacewor
Gold FeverFree versefaithfaith,political,
SplatteredI do not know?life
EchoQuatrainlost lovewords,love,
Bells (after Poe)Lyricpassion
Respectfully, Emily DickinsonLyricintrospection
Give the End Back to the BeginningFree versededication,faithme,
The Bruised and Rotting PearCoupletfaith,hope
flyFree verseanimals
ABC's for a Young CaptainABClife
Not Entirely About Living In New YorkFree verselifeworld,light,light,
WoodcutterI do not know?warold,old,
DreamsFree versefaith,forgiveness
A Feed of ChipsNarrativefunny
Weep O WillowsVersedeath
Harlem BluesFree verseblack-african amerchildre
Summers EverlastingFree versenostalgia
1234

Fav Poets

PoetCountry 
Carolyn Devonshire United States Flag United States Read
Carrie Richards United States Flag United States Read
Deirdre Omaidin Ireland Flag Ireland Read
Andrew Crisci United States Flag United States Read
Jim Fish United States Flag United States Read
Debbie Guzzi United States Flag United States Read
Nigel Fawcett Italy Flag Italy Read
L'nass Shango United States Flag United States Read
Andrea Dietrich United States Flag United States Read
Robert L. Hinshaw United States Flag United States Read
Chris D. Aechtner Canada Flag Canada Read
nette onclaud Philippines Flag Philippines Read
Sidney Beck Russian Federation Flag Russian Federation Read
Sami Al-khalili Canada Flag Canada Read
Charlotte Puddifoot United Kingdom Flag United Kingdom Read
Cyndi MacMillan Canada Flag Canada Read
T Wignesan _Not Listed Flag _Not Listed Read
Elaine George Canada Flag Canada Read
sharon weimer United States Flag United States Read
Michael Smith United States Flag United States Read
jack horne United Kingdom Flag United Kingdom Read