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Best Joe Flach Poems

Below are the all-time best Joe Flach poems as chosen by PoetrySoup members

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Details | Joe Flach Poem

Mr. Truly Amazing

Sixteen years old and in a world of her own
Confined to life lived in a wheelchair
Ever since birth, doctors don’t know what went wrong
But, it was like no one was at home in there

One summer vacation with the other kids in tow
The family visited a Kentucky horse stable
They left her alone in a sunny grass meadow
While off riding with the children who were able

While sitting alone in a catatonic state
Staring out somewhere in space
A gelding that was grazing, Mr. Truly Amazing
Came up and licked her on the face

The family returned to a shocking surprise
Seeing the wheelchair left unoccupied
They looked all around, then couldn’t believe their eyes
When they saw her standing with a horse by her side

She was petting his nose, feeding him an apple
And seemed to be whispering something
They were frozen in their tracks not believing the fact
That their Jenny was no longer a nothing

The mother walked up, in a delicate manner
Not wanting to interrupt this miracle’s course
When Jenny turned to her and in a shallow voice
Whispered, “Look, Mommy, I have a horse”


Details | Joe Flach Poem

The First Kiss or That Darn Ann Landers

Son of a gun we were still young;
only 15 years gone by.
You were the first my kissing bubble to burst, 
and for you, I think so was I.
I wanted to start putting other parts 
of our bodies in the field of play;
But you stopped it instead as you paused and read 
what Ann Landers had written to say:

Keep your petting on the outside, keep your tongues inside your mouth,
Keep your hands north of the border, don’t let them travel south.
There’s no use in trying to rush things and ruin the rest of your life,
So just hold his hands and hug him until you’re man and wife.

You stuck to your creed in spite of my plea, 
and I didn’t want to press you;
So your hand I would hold and my tongue I would fold, 
even though I want to undress you.
Late at night my conscience I’d fight, 
still awake in my lonely bed;
Thinking of you and what I would do 
if these words weren’t still stuck in my head:

Keep your petting on the outside, keep your tongues inside your mouth,
Keep your hands north of the border, don’t let them travel south.
There’s no use in trying to rush things and ruin the rest of your life,
So just hold his hands and hug him until you’re man and wife.

I followed your rules, played it cool
for the first ten to twenty dates;
But by the end of the year to me it was clear 
we wouldn’t be tempting our fate.
So we parted our ways; ending our days 
to see other people instead;
As I set forth looking of course 
for a girl who hadn’t read:

Keep your petting on the outside, keep your tongues inside your mouth,
Keep your hands north of the border, don’t let them travel south.
There’s no use in trying to rush things and ruin the rest of your life,
So just hold his hands and hug him until you’re man and wife.

More than thirty years have disappeared; 
For me two wives and four kids.
And as for you, I hear it’s true, 
that getting married you never did.
I’ll never forget and never regret
That first kiss where we both did live;
And though I did slander poor ole Ms. Landers 
to my daughter this advice I now give.

Keep your petting on the outside, keep your tongues inside your mouth,
Keep your hands north of the border, don’t let them travel south.
There’s no use in trying to rush things and ruin the rest of your life,
So just hold his hands and hug him until you’re man and wife.


Details | Joe Flach Poem

Conquering Rainbows

With the sun shining on my right side
And the clouds pouring rain on my left
It seemed to me, I didn’t have too far to go
To reach the most brilliant rainbow I had ever seen yet

I ran as fast as my little feet could take me
Before the spectacle could up and disappear
My whole life, I wanted to scale rainbows
I may as well do it right now and here

When I reached the beginning I was almost blinded
The red and orange were hot to my touch
But when I grabbed a hold of the yellow and green
They didn’t hurt so much

I placed one foot on the blue; the other on the indigo
I used the violet underneath me, to point out which way to go

The slope started off steep; it took everything I had to climb
As up and up and up I went, losing all track of time

At the top of the rainbow I could see forever
The earth beneath me and the heavens above
I had never felt this feeling before
I’m pretty sure that they call it “love”

I just sat there in peaceful silence
With the colors wrapped around my limbs
If happiness was a deep blue ocean
I had just jumped in it for a swim

The time had come for me to descend
As the sun was starting to set
I slid down the rainbow like a playground slide
On a ride I will never forget

When I reached the end of the rainbow
I found disappointed people looking for gold
But fortunes aren’t found at the end of the rainbow
It’s in the journey – or so I am told


Details | Joe Flach Poem

Johnny Had A Girl

Johnny was my best friend through our early teenage years;
Wherever one of us went the other could always be found near;
Until he found a girlfriend who soon supplanted me,
But because he was my best friend, for Johnny I was happy;
Johnny had a girl
He had a girl
Johnny had a girl
She rocked his world
Johnny had a girl.

Throughout four years of high school I was always the third wheel;
Going off often by myself, leaving Johnny with his girl;
They learned about biology outside the class room walls;
Johnny always had plans with her every time I would call;
Johnny had a girl
He had a girl
Johnny had a girl
Oh, what a thrill
Johnny had a girl.

One week before graduation, coming home from a date,
Johnny never saw the drunk driver until it was too late.
For three months in a coma, I sat by Johnny’s side;
I knew that when he woke up, someone had to tell him she’s not alive;
Johnny had a girl
He had a girl.

I took him to the gravesite so he could see it with his own eyes;
We stayed there for hours so Johnny could say his goodbyes.

Johnny got in his car that day and started heading west;
Nobody has seen Johnny since, I wish him the very best.
I’ve taken care of her graveside for thirty years and more;
If Johnny ever comes home again, we’ll be friends just like before;
Johnny had a girl
He had a girl
Johnny had a girl.


Details | Joe Flach Poem

My African Sister

I am a white, middle class, American male; raised in a white, middle class American home.  I would not say that my upbringing included a lot of diversity.

I remember talking to my brother, Jimmy, just before he told my father he was gay.  Jimmy told me about the inner struggle he wrestled with in first admitting to himself that he was homosexual.  He said he thought it was wrong; it was sinful and something he must avoid being.  Once he realized that being homosexual was not a fault but an innate sexual preference, he decided that he would not live a life of lies.  He, therefore, decided to tell his family about his sexual inclination.  It took a lot of courage to tell my ex-marine father.

Afi is a beautiful, strong, black African woman; raised in a black, African home.  Afi will admit that she is not overly charitable and not likely to do volunteer work.  When she first came to the U.S., however, she was appalled with how our society treated its AIDS victims.  In Africa, Afi would tell us, AIDS patients were embraced and cared for, not shunned and outcaste like here in the U.S.

Jimmy was not a promiscuous man.  He only knew a few sexual partners in his too short life.  Jimmy was a very intelligent and artistically gifted man.  He was doing post–doctorate research in Iraklion, Greece when he first started showing symptoms of having AIDS.

When Afi volunteered to be an AIDS Buddy she made it clear that she did not want to be paired with someone who had full-blown AIDS.  The organization was so hard pressed to find someone with a profile to match Jimmy’s intellect and interests that they begged Afi to just meet him, just once.

Afi says that within an hour she was no longer on a volunteer mission; she and Jimmy 
would be friends regardless of a commitment to the Buddy system.  Jimmy and Afi 
remained best of friends for the two remaining years we were blessed with his presence.

It has been 15 years since Jimmy passed away.  I am still a white, middle class, American male; from a white, middle class American family – only now, we have a beautiful, strong, black, African sister in our family.


Details | Joe Flach Poem

I Was Me

First I was me,
Selfish as can be,
Wanting everything from A to Z
And wanting it all for me.

Then I became we,
A part of an us.
I learned to share, give and take
I learned how to trust.

Next I was you,
Believe me its true.
I would rather give than receive,
It was you I wanted to please.

Now I am them,
A family man.
Giving my children,
All that I can.

If you look real close,
It is easy to see,
I am older and wiser,
And no longer a me.


Details | Joe Flach Poem

The Hardest Thing I've Ever Had To Do

The hardest thing I’ve ever had to do,
Was to say I’m through with you.

Well, of course, 
It was pretty hard when you refused to go to the funeral after my Father died,
And I’d hate for this relationship to end in a lie, so…

The second hardest thing I’ve ever had to do,
Was to say I’m through with you.

But, to come to think of it, 
It was probably harder when I had to give Skippy away.
You know, when you made us move to Florida because you hated the cold,
I’ll never forget that day.

The third hardest thing I’ve ever had to do,
Was to say I’m through with you.

Well, not quite as hard as it was when I had that little operation,
And you decided still to take your vacation,
And left me alone in the hospital with no visitation.
That was hard.

The fourth hardest thing I’ve ever had to do,
Was to say I’m through with you.

You know, I did take it pretty hard when I proposed to you
And you said if I couldn’t buy you a bigger ring we’d be through
And I had to sell my car and hock my guitar
To get you a ring as big as a star.
That was pretty hard.

The fifth hardest thing I’ve ever had to do,
Was to say I’m through with you.

Well darn it, no!
It was hard going to school at nights and working all day
Because you didn’t want to get a job and wanted me to earn more pay.
What exactly did you do with yourself all day!?

The sixth hardest thing I’ve ever had to do,
Was to say I’m through with you.

No, its time to admit it,
I saw you with Tom that night,
And Bob the time before that,
And Tim and George, Harry and Frank.
That was hard on me and I’ve got you to thank.

The seventh hardest thing I’ve ever had to do,
Was to say I’m through with you.

Now just wait a minute!
This is not hard.
In fact this is rather easy.
The hard part was living with you,
Placating you,
Pretending to love you,
Pretending that you loved me,
Heck, this is easy!

The easiest thing I’ve ever had to do,
Was to say I’m through with you!

Boy that was easy!
Now I feel much better.


Details | Joe Flach Poem

On A Bench

I was sitting on a bench, by the sunshine being drenched
When a strange situation took place
Someone sat next to me; from where he came I didn’t see
And I couldn’t get a good look at his face

Then he whispered in my ear, “Do you know why I am here”
And strangely, I thought that I might
I sensed his presence once before, standing in the bedroom door
When my father passed away in the night

I listened to a distant drum, knowing that my time had come
And asked if I could just bask a little longer
He said, “That beating is your heart, the journey we did start”
And I felt his grasp get a little stronger

They found me slumped on that bench and in my hand I had clenched
The pocket watch I inherited from Dad
Time means nothing more to me, now that I am history
Now my son has the watch we once had


Details | Joe Flach Poem

Pass It Foward

Having guided a young man through a tough time in life
It came time for him to move on;
Before he left he shook my hand, and said:
“I want to thank you for helping me along.”

“But how can I possibly give back to you
All the things that you have given to me?
How can I ever come close to repaying you;
It seems to be an impossibility."

I looked him straight in the eyes and said;
"Son, it’s your future I am looking toward,
The best way for paying me back
Is to pass my help along forward.

Take the things you learned from me
And pass them to your friends.
Take the love that I gave you
And pass it on once again.

Pass the encouragement,
Pass the support,
Take all the trust
And pass it on forth.

Never forget that you can’t give back,
But you can always pass things ahead,
And that way, the gifts I gave you
Will live on way after I’m dead.”


Details | Joe Flach Poem

The Ballad of Goodie-Two-Shoes

My mother went to heaven on the day that I was born
My father raised me up before my mother he would join
He said, “Son, to get to heaven you must live a good, clean life
So you can go to meet your mother and see me with my wife.”

So, I tried to be good and I followed the golden rule
I did what I should and I was obedient all through school
I shared what I could and I read my bible every day
I tried to avoid evil thoughts and never a hurtful thing I’d say

The kids picked on me and “goodie-two-shoes” became my name
But, because I had a mission my actions always were the same
The road to meet my mother was a path to be kept clear
So bullies had their way with me – no retaliation need they fear

After my father passed away I met a beautiful young girl
She was everything to me; she was the rock in my empty world
We got married in the Summer; she was carrying my child in the Spring
I was looking forward to being a father to this miracle she would bring

I was working at a charity when they broke into my house
My wife tried to hide from them, being quiet as a mouse
They said, “Oh look, its goodie-two-shoes’ home, lets burn it to the ground”
When she yelled at them to stop this act, my wife was finally found

I won’t say what they did to her – the details I will spare
When she said, “My husband will soon be back”, they said, “What do we care”
“Goodie-two-shoes shares everything, of course he’d share his wife
Besides, that man’s a coward; we can do just what we like.”

When I came home and saw her, my mother spoke into my ear,
“Don’t worry about heaven, son, I’ve always been right here.”
I took my wife to the hospital, where they said she’d be okay
Then I went to find those bastards and wipe my life of good away

When they saw me approaching they laughed right into my face
With the first swing of the baseball bat I fell from heavens’ grace
Two men were unconscious before the third knew what to do
The bullet that he shot at me, my shoulder it passed right through

Justifiable homicide – on probation for ten years
My wife and son at my side, there is happiness in my tears
My mother and father visit me every night in my bedtime dreams
I didn’t need to take that path to heaven – or so, at least, it seems


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