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Grief Haiku Poems - PoetrySoup

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Poem Details | by L'nass Shango
Categories: nature,satirejoy,

Adirondacks Ode

Climb high these mountains
And meet cliffs of history
Snug against the moon

Cold lover's warm kiss
Caress each syllable of song
Love makes joy exist
 
Adirondacks mist
The milk of mothering trees 
Melted on morning's joy

Tongue lark the dark lakes
Water births of memory
Ego ice thin here 

The nation's blood lens
The red moon night, so pride stakes
Claim to fluid truth
  
The wind prowls the skin
Stirring leaves of memories
A breast dried of peace  

Algonquian trail
Footsteps eat the span of trees
Man is small in grief

The muskets torment
Fusion of mission and right
The north shrikes lament

And beg migrants gone
But wax wing they shun the sun
Bunting snow for life.

Old Mohawk glory
Gone when forest bare shivers
In castles of ice

Steel teeth scrape the rocks
And eat iron from the ore
Of greed, killing trees

Logging the green tongue
Of the sun's wealth of heat
For this new kingdom

Of civilized men
Performing barbaric feats
Distant from the den.

Dusk the Gilded Age
Of rage ... like natives, all past
Diseased to the eye

A new dawn breaks song
And howls of joy claim again
The blessings of rain

Sceptered in the throat
Cities' diamonds of dew
Love of warblers note.

Love is eagle's joy
Climbing high against the breast
Peaking in delight.


Poem Details | by James Burns
Categories: angst,confusion,death,fam

Passing...

  Screams above the din

A moment of grief and loss

    A loved one passes


Poem Details | by Anne Lise Andresen
Categories: death,life,love,

Haiku - X4 - Heart


                                         A heart
                            learning language of love
                                    but also grief

                                       The grief
                            learning heart to go uphill
                                    death is heavy











20.10.2012
A-L  Andresen :)


Poem Details | by Gerard Keogh Jr.
Categories: animals,imagination,natur

The Fox, The Wolf, The Coyote,

     The Fox:

1.  the blare of the horn
     snooty hooves of  fire red coats...
     panting for my life

2.  briar rabbit ears
     twisting in my angry grip...
     more tall tales are told

3.  a hen in my mouth
     a farmer without his gun...
     life can be so good

     The Wolf:

1.  silver sinews coil
     full moon permits me to speak...
     shivers for all men

2.  my proud bloody coat
     clings to young Navaho skin...
     tales of my demise

3.  the grind of tractors
     growl grief to my amber eyes...
     leave my land alone

     The Coyote:

1.  mangy vermin shriek
     pelts darken with scarlet smear...
     ranchers open fire

2.  mere morsels to munch
     lupine snap shears of warning...
     always last in line

3.  roy rodgers singing
     cactus cattle and trail dust...
     my chorus off key 



Poem Details | by paul holmes
Categories: life

Tears


Emotions wet trail
Of laughter or grief, often
A mixture of both.


Poem Details | by nicole marrier
Categories: recovery from...,

Grieve

Today im not sad
Im in the next stage of grief
Today im angry


Poem Details | by Shadow Hamilton
Categories: death,

Death and Grief

Death creeps quietly in
often taking by surprise
one last gasp of air

leaving behind pain
sadness, sorrow and such loss
emptiness of heart

days pass by in grief
each becomes full of torment
as one struggles on

no light just darkness
no end is yet to be found
time they say will heal

for them left behind
no peace, just grief smothering
icy heart with blackness

written 9/16/2013

contest Grief


Poem Details | by Jack Jordan
Categories: grief,nature,

Haiku 49

	
	rainy season 
	grief, white hydrangeas 
	hungry caterpillar



In part, The Haiku Society of America’s definition of a haiku reads, “Usually a haiku in English is written in three unrhymed lines of seventeen or fewer syllables.” Further, Japanese scholar Shigehisa Kuriyama states, “The 5-7-5 pattern by itself does not make a haiku.” (Gurga, p. 1). Contemporary English language haiku have departed radically from the 5-7-5 convention, including the Beat haiku of Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg, and Gary Snyder, the latter awarded the Masaoka Shiki International Haiku Grand Prize in 2004. The haiku of Robert Spiess are especially experimental.

I recommend two sources for further study of haiku: “Haiku: A Poet’s Guide,” by Lee Gurga, addresses haiku in it’s traditional form; “Haiku Poetics in Twentieth-Century Avant-Garde Poetry,” by Jeffery Johnson discusses haiku as realized by modernist poets.  

Speaking personally, it is most important for me to enjoy writing a haiku, correct form or not, and for my haiku to be enjoyed by the reader.




Poem Details | by Jack Jordan
Categories: grief,

Melancholy

	
	
	Melancholy
	
	rainy season 
	grief, white hydrangeas 
	hungry caterpillar


	A haikuette for “Haiku Wannabees”


Poem Details | by Michael J. Falotico
Categories: depression

"Less to Carry"

My shoulders are tired
of carrying so much grief
from a long hard week..


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