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Short Poetry by Popular Famous Poets

 Poet
1 William Wordsworth
2 Emily Dickinson
3 William Shakespeare
4 Maya Angelou
5 Langston Hughes
6 Robert Frost
7 Walt Whitman
8 Rabindranath Tagore
9 Shel Silverstein
10 William Blake
11 Pablo Neruda
12 Sylvia Plath
13 Edward Estlin (E E) Cummings
14 William Butler Yeats
15 Tupac Shakur
16 Oscar Wilde
17 Rudyard Kipling
18 Sandra Cisneros
19 Alfred Lord Tennyson
20 Alice Walker
21 Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
22 Billy Collins
23 Christina Rossetti
24 Carol Ann Duffy
25 Charles Bukowski
26 Edgar Allan Poe
27 Sarojini Naidu
28 John Donne
29 Ralph Waldo Emerson
30 Nikki Giovanni
31 John Keats
32 Raymond Carver
33 Mark Twain
34 Thomas Hardy
35 Anne Sexton
36 Lewis Carroll
37 Elizabeth Barrett Browning
38 Gary Soto
39 Carl Sandburg
40 Alexander Pushkin
41 Gwendolyn Brooks
42 Henry David Thoreau
43 George (Lord) Byron
44 Spike Milligan
45 Margaret Atwood
46 Muhammad Ali
47 Roger McGough
48 Sara Teasdale
49 Jane Austen
50 Allen Ginsberg
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Famous Short Sun Poems

Famous Short Sun Poems. Short Sun Poetry by Famous Poets. A collection of the all-time best Sun short poems

Other Short Poem Pages

Sun | Short Famous Poems and Poets

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by Henry Van Dyke

Katrinas Sun-Dial

 Hours fly,
Flowers die:
New days,
New ways:
Pass by!
Love stays.


by Emily Dickinson

The pattern of the sun

 The pattern of the sun
Can fit but him alone
For sheen must have a Disk
To be a sun --


by Dorothy Parker

Two-Volume Novel

 The sun's gone dim, and
The moon's turned black;
For I loved him, and
He didn't love back.


by Emily Dickinson

Had I not seen the Sun

 Had I not seen the Sun
I could have borne the shade
But Light a newer Wilderness
My Wilderness has made --


by Emily Dickinson

Nature assigns the Sun --

 Nature assigns the Sun --
That -- is Astronomy --
Nature cannot enact a Friend --
That -- is Astrology.


by Emily Dickinson

Soil of Flint if steady tilled --

 Soil of Flint, if steady tilled --
Will refund by Hand --
Seed of Palm, by Libyan Sun
Fructified in Sand --


by Emily Dickinson

The Sun and Fog contested

 The Sun and Fog contested
The Government of Day --
The Sun took down his Yellow Whip
And drove the Fog away --


by Gelett Burgess

The Lazy Roof

 The Roof it has a Lazy Time
A-Lying in the Sun;
The Walls, they have to Hold Him Up;
They do Not Have Much Fun!


by Emily Dickinson

The Work of Her that went

 The Work of Her that went,
The Toil of Fellows done --
In Ovens green our Mother bakes,
By Fires of the Sun.


by Emily Dickinson

The Sun is one -- and on the Tare

 The Sun is one -- and on the Tare
He doth as punctual call
As on the conscientious Flower
And estimates them all --


by Emily Dickinson

Opinion is a flitting thing

 Opinion is a flitting thing,
But Truth, outlasts the Sun --
If then we cannot own them both --
Possess the oldest one --


by Emily Dickinson

Morning -- is the place for Dew

 Morning -- is the place for Dew --
Corn -- is made at Noon --
After dinner light -- for flowers --
Dukes -- for Setting Sun!


by Emily Dickinson

The longest day that God appoints

 The longest day that God appoints
Will finish with the sun.
Anguish can travel to its stake, And then it must return.


by Emily Dickinson

Count not that far that can be had

 Count not that far that can be had,
Though sunset lie between --
Nor that adjacent, that beside,
Is further than the sun.


by Emily Dickinson

Rest at Night

 Rest at Night
The Sun from shining,
Nature -- and some Men --
Rest at Noon -- some Men --
While Nature
And the Sun -- go on --


by Emily Dickinson

These are the days that Reindeer love

 These are the days that Reindeer love
And pranks the Northern star --
This is the Sun's objective,
And Finland of the Year.


by Emily Dickinson

Time does go on --

 Time does go on --
I tell it gay to those who suffer now --
They shall survive --
There is a sun --
They don't believe it now --


by Emily Dickinson

Look back on Time with kindly eyes --

 Look back on Time, with kindly eyes --
He doubtless did his best --
How softly sinks that trembling sun
In Human Nature's West --


by Emily Dickinson

Dying at my music!

 Dying at my music!
Bubble! Bubble!
Hold me till the Octave's run!
Quick! Burst the Windows!
Ritardando!
Phials left, and the Sun!


by Robert Herrick

Eternity

 He who binds to himself a joy
Does the winged life destroy;
But he who kisses the joy as it flies
Lives in eternity's sun rise.


by Emily Dickinson

Love reckons by itself -- alone --

 Love reckons by itself -- alone --
"As large as I" -- relate the Sun
To One who never felt it blaze --
Itself is all the like it has --


by Emily Dickinson

So set its Sun in Thee

 So set its Sun in Thee
What Day be dark to me --
What Distance -- far --
So I the Ships may see
That touch -- how seldomly --
Thy Shore?


by Charles Bukowski

Finish

 We are like roses that have never bothered to
bloom when we should have bloomed and
it is as if
the sun has become disgusted with
waiting


by Emily Dickinson

The Sun in reigning to the West

 The Sun in reigning to the West
Makes not as much of sound
As Cart of man in road below
Adroitly turning round
That Whiffletree of Amethyst


by Edward Lear

B was a bat

B

was a bat,
Who slept all the day,
And fluttered about
When the sun went away.

b!

Brown little bat!


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