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Famous Short Rainbow Poems. Short Rainbow Poetry by Famous Poets

Famous Short Rainbow Poems. Short Rainbow Poetry by Famous Poets. A collection of the all-time best Rainbow short poems

See also: Best Famous Short Poems | Short Member Poems | Best Short Member Poems | Top 100 Famous Short Poems

 
by Emily Dickinson

We shall find the Cube of the Rainbow.

 We shall find the Cube of the Rainbow.
Of that, there is no doubt.
But the Arc of a Lover's conjecture Eludes the finding out.


by Lucy Maud Montgomery

The Poets Thought

 It came to him in rainbow dreams, 
Blent with the wisdom of the sages, 
Of spirit and of passion born; 
In words as lucent as the morn 
He prisoned it, and now it gleams 
A jewel shining through the ages.


by Emily Dickinson

The rainbow never tells me

 The rainbow never tells me
That gust and storm are by,
Yet is she more convincing
Than Philosophy.
My flowers turn from Forums -- Yet eloquent declare What Cato couldn't prove me Except the birds were here!


by Emily Dickinson

The Dying need but little Dear

 The Dying need but little, Dear,
A Glass of Water's all,
A Flower's unobtrusive Face
To punctuate the Wall,

A Fan, perhaps, a Friend's Regret
And Certainty that one
No color in the Rainbow
Perceive, when you are gone.


by Elizabeth Bishop

Sonnet (1979)

 Caught -- the bubble
in the spirit level,
a creature divided;
and the compass needle
wobbling and wavering,
undecided.
Freed -- the broken thermometer's mercury running away; and the rainbow-bird from the narrow bevel of the empty mirror, flying wherever it feels like, gay!


by Katherine Mansfield

The Secret

 In the profoundest ocean
There is a rainbow shell,
It is always there, shining most stilly
Under the greatest storm waves
That the old Greek called "ripples of laughter.
" As you listen, the rainbow shell Sings--in the profoundest ocean.
It is always there, singing most silently!


by Howard Nemerov

The Beautiful Lawn Sprinkler

 What gives it power makes it change its mind
At each extreme, and lean its rising rain
Down low, first one and then the other way;
In which exchange humility and pride
Reverse, forgive, arise, and die again,
Wherefore it holds at both ends of the day
The rainbow in its scattering grains of spray.


by Vachel Lindsay

The Spider and the Ghost of the Fly

 Once I loved a spider
When I was born a fly,
A velvet-footed spider
With a gown of rainbow-dye.
She ate my wings and gloated.
She bound me with a hair.
She drove me to her parlor Above her winding stair.
To educate young spiders She took me all apart.
My ghost came back to haunt her.
I saw her eat my heart.


by Emily Dickinson

As far from pity as complaint

 As far from pity, as complaint --
As cool to speech -- as stone --
As numb to Revelation
As if my Trade were Bone --

As far from time -- as History --
As near yourself -- Today --
As Children, to the Rainbow's scarf --
Or Sunset's Yellow play

To eyelids in the Sepulchre --
How dumb the Dancer lies --
While Color's Revelations break --
And blaze -- the Butterflies!


by William Henry Davies

A Great Time

 Sweet Chance, that led my steps abroad, 
Beyond the town, where wild flowers grow -- 
A rainbow and a cuckoo, Lord, 
How rich and great the times are now! 
Know, all ye sheep 
And cows, that keep 
On staring that I stand so long 
In grass that's wet from heavy rain -- 
A rainbow and a cuckoo's song 
May never come together again; 
May never come 
This side the tomb.


by Walter Savage Landor

Why Why Repine

 Why, why repine, my pensive friend, 
At pleasures slipp'd away? 
Some the stern Fates will never lend, 
And all refuse to stay.
I see the rainbow in the sky, The dew upon the grass, I see them, and I ask not why They glimmer or they pass.
With folded arms I linger not To call them back; 'twere vain; In this, or in some other spot, I know they'll shine again.


by Walter Savage Landor

Resignation

 WHY, why repine, my pensive friend, 
 At pleasures slipp'd away? 
Some the stern Fates will never lend, 
 And all refuse to stay.
I see the rainbow in the sky, The dew upon the grass; I see them, and I ask not why They glimmer or they pass.
With folded arms I linger not To call them back; 'twere vain: In this, or in some other spot, I know they'll shine again.


by Emily Dickinson

On this long storm the Rainbow rose

 On this long storm the Rainbow rose --
On this late Morn -- the Sun --
The clouds -- like listless Elephants --
Horizons -- straggled down --

The Birds rose smiling, in their nests --
The gales -- indeed -- were done --
Alas, how heedless were the eyes --
On whom the summer shone!

The quiet nonchalance of death --
No Daybreak -- can bestir --
The slow -- Archangel's syllables
Must awaken her!


by Thomas Moore

Erin! The Tear and the Smile in Thine Eyes

 Erin! the tear and the smile in thine eyes 
Blend like the rainbow that hangs in thy skies, 
Shining through sorrow's stream, 
Saddening through pleasure's beam, 
Thy suns with doubtful gleam, 
Weep while they rise.
Erin, thy silent tear never shall cease, Erin, thy languid smile ne'er shall increase, Till, like the rainbow's light, Thy various tints unite, And form in heaven's sight One arch of peace!


by Anne Sexton

Raccoon

 Coon, why did you come to this dance
with a mask on? Why not the tin man
and his rainbow girl? Why not Racine,
his hair marcelled down to his chest?
Why not come as a stomach digesting
its worms? Why you little fellow
with your ears at attention and your
nose poking up like a microphone?
You whig emblem, you woman chaser,
who do you dance over the wide lawn tonight
clanging the garbage pail like great silver bells?


by Carl Sandburg

Sumach and Birds

 IF you never came with a pigeon rainbow purple
Shining in the six o’clock September dusk:
If the red sumach on the autumn roads
Never danced on the flame of your eyelashes:
If the red-haws never burst in a million
Crimson fingertwists of your heartcrying:
If all this beauty of yours never crushed me
Then there are many flying acres of birds for me,
Many drumming gray wings going home I shall see,
Many crying voices riding the north wind.


by William Strode

Justification

 See how the Rainbow in the skie
Seems gaudy through the Suns bright eye;
Harke how an Eccho answere makes,
Feele how a board is smooth'd with waxe,
Smell how a glove putts on perfume,
Tast how theyr sweetnesse pills assume:
So by imputed Justice, Clay
Seemes faire, well spoke, smooth, sweet, each way.
The eye doth gaze on robes appearing, The prompted Eccho takes our hearing, The board our touch, the sent our smell, The pill our tast: Man, God as well.