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Famous Short Race Poems

Famous Short Race Poems. Short Race Poetry by Famous Poets. A collection of the all-time best Race short poems

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Race | Short Famous Poems and Poets

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by Emily Dickinson

He went by sleep that drowsy route

 He went by sleep that drowsy route
To the surmising Inn --
At day break to begin his race
Or ever to remain --


by Friedrich von Schiller

The Present Generation

 Was it always as now? This race I truly can't fathom.
Nothing is young but old age; youth, alas! only is old.


by Kalidasa

I see you hunt the spotted deer

I see you hunt the spotted deer
With shafts to end his race,
As though God Shiva should appear
In his immortal chase.


by Aleister Crowley

Optimist

 Kill off mankind,
And give the Earth a chance!
Nature might find
In her inheritance
The seedlings of a race
Less infinitely base.


by Omar Khayyam

O unenlightened race of humankind,

O unenlightened race of humankind,
Ye are a nothing, built on empty wind!
Yea, a mere nothing, hovering in the abyss,
A void before you, and a void behind!


by Omar Khayyam

Many have come, and run their eager race,

Many have come, and run their eager race,
Striving for pleasures, luxuries, or place,
And quaffed their wine, and now all silent lie,
Enfolded in their parent earth's embrace.


by Omar Khayyam

When Allah yoked the courses of the sun,

When Allah yoked the courses of the sun,
And launched the Pleiades their race to run,
My lot was fixed in fate's high chancery;
Then why blame me for wrong that fate has done?


by Ella Wheeler Wilcox

A Marine Etching

 A yacht from its harbour ropes pulled free,
And leaped like a steed o’er the race track blue,
Then up behind her, the dust of the sea,
A gray fog, drifted, and hid her from view.


by Ella Wheeler Wilcox

A yacht from its harbour ropes pulled free

 A yacht from its harbour ropes pulled free,
And leaped like a steed o’er the race track blue,
Then up behind her, the dust of the sea,
A gray fog, drifted, and hid her from view.


by Emily Dickinson

My friend attacks my friend!

 My friend attacks my friend!
Oh Battle picturesque!
Then I turn Soldier too,
And he turns Satirist!
How martial is this place!
Had I a mighty gun
I think I'd shoot the human race
And then to glory run!


by Emily Dickinson

When the Astronomer stops seeking

 When the Astronomer stops seeking
For his Pleiad's Face --
When the lone British Lady
Forsakes the Arctic Race

When to his Covenant Needle
The Sailor doubting turns --
It will be amply early
To ask what treason means.


by Omar Khayyam

Wine, which the wise man knows how to appreciate,

Wine, which the wise man knows how to appreciate,
is for me the water of life and I its prophet am. It is
balm for the heart, an elixir which fortifies the soul.
Has God Himself not said: The benefits of the human
race are found in wine.


by Omar Khayyam

To drink wine and rejoice is my gospel of life. To

To drink wine and rejoice is my gospel of life. To
be as indifferent to heresy as to religion is my creed. I
asked the bride of the human race [the world] what her
dowry was, and she answered: My dowry consists in the
joy of my heart.
293


by Walter Savage Landor

Rose Aylmer

 Ah, what avails the sceptred race!
Ah, what the form divine!
What every virtue, every grace!
Rose Aylmer, all were thine.
Rose Aylmer, whom these wakeful eyes May weep, but never see, A night of memories and sighs I consecrate to thee.


by Emily Dickinson

My God -- He sees thee --

 My God -- He sees thee --
Shine thy best --
Fling up thy Balls of Gold
Till every Cubit play with thee
And every Crescent hold --
Elate the Acre at his feet --
Upon his Atom swim --
Oh Sun -- but just a Second's right
In thy long Race with him!


by Walt Whitman

Race of Veterans

 RACE of veterans! Race of victors! 
Race of the soil, ready for conflict! race of the conquering march! 
(No more credulity’s race, abiding-temper’d race;) 
Race henceforth owning no law but the law of itself; 
Race of passion and the storm.
5


by Auhad-uddin Ali Anwari

The mosque no more admits

The mosque no more admits the pious race;
Constrain'd, they yield to beasts the holy place,
A stable now, where dome nor porch is found:
Nor can the savage for proclaim his reign,
For Khorasania's criers all are slain,
And all her pulpits levelled with the ground.


by Omar Khayyam

Diversity of creed divides the human race into about

Diversity of creed divides the human race into about
seventy-two sects. Amongst all these dogmas, I have
chosen that of Thy love. What signify these words:
Impiety, Islamism, creed, sin? My true aim is to seek
Thee. Far be from me all these vain, indifferent pretexts.
341


by Ogden Nash

The Germ

 A mighty creature is the germ,
Though smaller than the pachyderm.
His customary dwelling place Is deep within the human race.
His childish pride he often pleases By giving people strange diseases.
Do you, my poppet, feel infirm? You probably contain a germ.


by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

THE BRETHREN

 SLUMBER and Sleep, two brethren ordain'd by the gods to their 
service,

Were by Prometheus implored, comfort to give to his race;
But though so light to the gods, too heavy for man was their burden,

We in their slumber find sleep, we in their sleep meet with death.
1789.
*


by William Butler Yeats

The Delphic Oracle Upon Plotinus

 Behold that great Plotinus swim,
Buffeted by such seas;
Bland Rhadamanthus beckons him,
But the Golden Race looks dim,
Salt blood blocks his eyes.
Scattered on the level grass Or winding through the grove plato there and Minos pass, There stately Pythagoras And all the choir of Love.


by Omar Khayyam

The inhabitants of the tomb are returned to earth in

The inhabitants of the tomb are returned to earth in
dust; the atoms [of which they are composed] are scattered
here and there, separated one from the other.
Alas! what is this drink in which the human race is
soaked and which holds it thus in dizzy ignorance of all
things, even to the day of doom?


by Ella Wheeler Wilcox

A Fallen Leaf

 A trusting little leaf of green,
A bold audacious frost;
A rendezvous, a kiss or two,
And youth for ever lost.
Ah, me! The bitter, bitter cost.
A flaunting patch of vivid red, That quivers in the sun; A windy gust, a grave of dust, The little race is run.
Ah, me! Were that the only one.


by Algernon Charles Swinburne

Wasted Love

 What shall be done for sorrow
With love whose race is run?
Where help is none to borrow,
What shall be done?

In vain his hands have spun
The web, or drawn the furrow:
No rest their toil hath won.
His task is all gone thorough, And fruit thereof is none: And who dare say to-morrow What shall be done?


by Walt Whitman

To a Certain Cantatrice

 HERE, take this gift! 
I was reserving it for some hero, speaker, or General, 
One who should serve the good old cause, the great Idea, the progress and freedom of the
 race; 
Some brave confronter of despots—some daring rebel; 
—But I see that what I was reserving, belongs to you just as much as to any.
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