Submit Your Poems
Get Your Premium Membership

See and share Beautiful Nature Photos and amazing photos of interesting places

Famous Short Pride Poems. Short Pride Poetry by Famous Poets

Famous Short Pride Poems. Short Pride Poetry by Famous Poets. A collection of the all-time best Pride short poems

See also: Best Famous Short Poems | Short Member Poems | Best Short Member Poems | Top 100 Famous Short Poems

12
 
by Walt Whitman

Thou Reader.

 THOU reader throbbest life and pride and love the same as I, 
Therefore for thee the following chants.


by Dorothy Parker

Rhyme Against Living

 If wild my breast and sore my pride,
I bask in dreams of suicide;
If cool my heart and high my head,
I think, "How lucky are the dead!"


by Robert Burns

541. Song—Fragment—Leezie Lindsay

 WILL ye go to the Hielands, Leezie Lindsay,
 Will ye go to the Hielands wi’ me?
Will ye go to the Hielands, Leezie Lindsay,
 My pride and my darling to be.


by Ella Wheeler Wilcox

Earthly Pride

 How baseless is the mightiest earthly pride, 
The diamond is but charcoal purified, 
The lordliest pearl that decks a monarch’s breast
Is but an insect’s sepulchre at best.


by Maya Angelou

Insomniac

 There are some nights when
sleep plays coy,
aloof and disdainful.
And all the wiles
that I employ to win
its service to my side
are useless as wounded pride,
and much more painful.


by Walter Savage Landor

Proud Word You Never Spoke

 Proud word you never spoke, but you will speak
Four not exempt from pride some future day.
Resting on one white hand a warm wet cheek,
Over my open volume you will say,
'This man loved me'—then rise and trip away.


by Walt Whitman

Not My Enemies Ever Invade Me.

 NOT my enemies ever invade me—no harm to my pride from them I fear; 
But the lovers I recklessly love—lo! how they master me! 
Lo! me, ever open and helpless, bereft of my strength! 
Utterly abject, grovelling on the ground before them.


by Dorothy Parker

Iseult Of Brittany

 So delicate my hands, and long,
They might have been my pride.
And there were those to make them song
Who for their touch had died.

Too frail to cup a heart within,
Too soft to hold the free-
How long these lovely hands have been
A bitterness to me!


by Robert Burns

174. The Bard at Inverary

 WHOE’ER he be that sojourns here,
 I pity much his case,
Unless he comes to wait upon
 The Lord their God, His Grace.


There’s naething here but Highland pride,
 And Highland scab and hunger:
If Providence has sent me here,
 ’Twas surely in his anger.


by Walter Savage Landor

Do you Remember me? or are you Proud?

 "Do you remember me? or are you proud?"
Lightly advancing thro' her star-trimm'd crowd,
Ianthe said, and lookt into my eyes,
"A yes, a yes, to both: for Memory
Where you but once have been must ever be,
And at your voice Pride from his throne must rise."


by Walter Savage Landor

Ianthes Question

 ‘Do you remember me? or are you proud?’
Lightly advancing thro’ her star-trimm’d crowd,
Ianthe said, and look’d into my eyes.
‘A yes, a yes to both: for Memory
Where you but once have been must ever be,
And at your voice Pride from his throne must rise.’


by Ogden Nash

The Germ

 A mighty creature is the germ,
Though smaller than the pachyderm.
His customary dwelling place 
Is deep within the human race. 
His childish pride he often pleases 
By giving people strange diseases. 
Do you, my poppet, feel infirm? 
You probably contain a germ.


by Robert William Service

The Wistful One

 I sought the trails of South and North,
I wandered East and West;
But pride and passion drove me forth
And would not let me rest.
And still I seek, as still I roam,
A snug roof overhead;
Four walls, my own; a quiet home. . . .
"You'll have it -- when you're dead."


by William Butler Yeats

He Thinks Of Those Who Have Spoken Evil Of His Beloved

 Half close your eyelids, loosen your hair,
And dream about the great and their pride;
They have spoken against you everywhere,
But weigh this song with the great and their pride;
I made it out of a mouthful of air,
Their children's children shall say they have lied.


by William Butler Yeats

The Peacock

 What's riches to him
That has made a great peacock
With the pride of his eye?
The wind-beaten, stone-grey,
And desolate Three Rock
Would nourish his whim.
Live he or die
Amid wet rocks and heather,
His ghost will be gay
Adding feather to feather
For the pride of his eye.


by William Butler Yeats

The Peacock

 What's riches to him
That has made a great peacock
With the pride of his eye?
The wind-beaten, stone-grey,
And desolate Three Rock
Would nourish his whim.
Live he or die
Amid wet rocks and heather,
His ghost will be gay
Adding feather to feather
For the pride of his eye.


by Dorothy Parker

Fighting Words

 Say my love is easy had,
Say I'm bitten raw with pride,
Say I am too often sad-
Still behold me at your side.

Say I'm neither brave nor young,
Say I woo and coddle care,
Say the devil touched my tongue-
Still you have my heart to wear.

But say my verses do not scan,
And I get me another man!


by Howard Nemerov

The Beautiful Lawn Sprinkler

 What gives it power makes it change its mind
At each extreme, and lean its rising rain
Down low, first one and then the other way;
In which exchange humility and pride
Reverse, forgive, arise, and die again,
Wherefore it holds at both ends of the day
The rainbow in its scattering grains of spray.


by Richard Wilbur

Parable

 I read how Quixote in his random ride
Came to a crossing once, and lest he lose
The purity of chance, would not decide

Whither to fare, but wished his horse to choose.
For glory lay wherever turned the fable.
His head was light with pride, his horse's shoes

Were heavy, and he headed for the stable.


by Edwin Arlington Robinson

An Old Story

 Strange that I did not know him then. 
That friend of mine! 
I did not even show him then 
One friendly sign;

But cursed him for the ways he had 
To make me see 
My envy of the praise he had 
For praising me.

I would have rid the earth of him 
Once, in my pride... 
I never knew the worth of him 
Until he died.


by Percy Bysshe Shelley

Poetical Essay

 Extract from Poetical Essay by Percy Bysshe Shelley


Millions to fight compell'd, to fight or die
In mangled heaps on War's red altar lie . . . 
When the legal murders swell the lists of pride;
When glory's views the titled idiot guide


Lost Shelley poem found after 200 years
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,2-2267433,00.html


by Algernon Charles Swinburne

Prelude - Tristan And Isolde

 Fate, out of the deep sea's gloom,
When a man's heart's pride grows great,
And nought seems now to foredoom
Fate,

Fate, laden with fears in wait,
Draws close through the clouds that loom,
Till the soul see, all too late,

More dark than a dead world's tomb,
More high than the sheer dawn's gate,
More deep than the wide sea's womb,
Fate.


by Claude McKay

The Citys Love

 For one brief golden moment rare like wine, 
The gracious city swept across the line; 
Oblivious of the color of my skin, 
Forgetting that I was an alien guest, 
She bent to me, my hostile heart to win, 
Caught me in passion to her pillowy breast; 
The great, proud city, seized with a strange love, 
Bowed down for one flame hour my pride to prove.


by William Butler Yeats

The Three Monuments

 They hold their public meetings where
Our most renowned patriots stand,
One among the birds of the air,
A stumpier on either hand;
And all the popular statesmen say
That purity built up the State
And after kept it from decay;
And let all base ambition be,
For intellect would make us proud
And pride bring in impurity:
The three old rascals laugh aloud.


by Delmore Schwartz

Albert Einstein To Archibald Macleish

 I should have been a plumber fixing drains.
And mending pure white bathtubs for the great Diogenes
(who scorned all lies, all liars, and all tyrannies),

And then, perhaps, he would bestow on me -- majesty!
(O modesty aside, forgive my fallen pride, O hidden
 majesty,
The lamp, the lantern, the lucid light he sought for 

 All too often -- sick humanity!)


12