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Famous Short Places Poems. Short Places Poetry by Famous Poets

Famous Short Places Poems. Short Places Poetry by Famous Poets. A collection of the all-time best Places short poems

See also: Best Famous Short Poems | Short Member Poems | Best Short Member Poems | Top 100 Famous Short Poems

 
by Dejan Stojanovic

The Return

I visited many places, 
Some of them quite 
Exotic and far away, 
But I always returned to myself.


by John Masefield

An Epilogue

 I had seen flowers come in stony places
And kind things done by men with ugly faces,
And the gold cup won by the worst horse at the races,
Ao I trust, too.


by William Butler Yeats

The Great Day

 Hurrah for revolution and more cannon-shot!
A beggar upon horseback lashes a beggar on foot.
Hurrah for revolution and cannon come again!
The beggars have changed places, but the lash goes on.


by Donald Justice

A Map Of Love

 Your face more than others' faces
Maps the half-remembered places
I have come to I while I slept—
Continents a dream had kept
Secret from all waking folk
Till to your face I awoke,
And remembered then the shore,
And the dark interior.


by Emily Dickinson

Death leaves Us homesick who behind

 Death leaves Us homesick, who behind,
Except that it is gone
Are ignorant of its Concern
As if it were not born.

Through all their former Places, we
Like Individuals go
Who something lost, the seeking for
Is all that's left them, now --


by Carl Sandburg

Haunts

 THERE are places I go when I am strong.
One is a marsh pool where I used to go
 with a long-ear hound-dog.
One is a wild crabapple tree; I was there
 a moonlight night with a girl.
The dog is gone; the girl is gone; I go to these
 places when there is no other place to go.


by Robert Frost

Atmosphere

 Inscription for a Garden Wall

Winds blow the open grassy places bleak;
But where this old wall burns a sunny cheek,
They eddy over it too toppling weak
To blow the earth or anything self-clear;
Moisture and color and odor thicken here.
The hours of daylight gather atmosphere.


by Stephen Crane

Places among the stars

 Places among the stars,
Soft gardens near the sun,
Keep your distant beauty;
Shed no beams upon my weak heart.
Since she is here
In a place of blackness,
Not your golden days
Nor your silver nights
Can call me to you.
Since she is here
In a place of blackness,
Here I stay and wait


by Mary Elizabeth Coleridge

We Never Said Farewell

 WE never said farewell, nor even looked 
Our last upon each other, for no sign 
Was made when we the linkèd chain unhooked 
And broke the level line. 

And here we dwell together, side by side, 
Our places fixed for life upon the chart. 
Two islands that the roaring seas divide 
Are not more far apart.


by Emily Dickinson

In many and reportless places

 In many and reportless places
We feel a Joy --
Reportless, also, but sincere as Nature
Or Deity --

It comes, without a consternation --
Dissolves -- the same --
But leaves a sumptuous Destitution --
Without a Name --

Profane it by a search -- we cannot
It has no home --
Nor we who having once inhaled it --
Thereafter roam.


by Dejan Stojanovic

Unpretentious Dreams

How hard it is not to say too much, 
How hard to love more, 
To say simple things, 
Live like a river slowly eroding the stone, 
Watch from the shore the distant dot, 
Imagine places bathing in its light, 
To see, not colors, not shapes, not the sea 
But the simple life glistening 
And hovering like a bird 
Full of unpretentious dreams 
Satisfied only with the ability to fly.


by Sarojini Naidu

To My Fairy Fancies

 NAY, no longer I may hold you, 
In my spirit's soft caresses, 
Nor like lotus-leaves enfold you 
In the tangles of my tresses. 
Fairy fancies, fly away 
To the white cloud-wildernesses, 
Fly away!


Nay, no longer ye may linger 
With your laughter-lighted faces, 
Now I am a thought-worn singer 
In life's high and lonely places. 
Fairy fancies, fly away, 
To bright wind-inwoven spaces, 
Fly away!


by Katherine Mansfield

Countrywomen

 These be two
Countrywomen.
What a size!
Grand big arms
And round red faces;
Big substantial
Sit-down-places;
Great big bosoms firm as cheese
Bursting through their country jackets;
Wide big laps
And sturdy knees;
Hands outspread,
Round and rosy,
Hands to hold
A country posy
Or a baby or a lamb--
And such eyes!
Stupid, shifty, small and sly
Peeping through a slit of sty,
Squinting through their neighbours' plackets.


by Rainer Maria Rilke

What Fields Are As Fragrant As Your Hands?

 What fields are as fragrant as your hands?
You feel how external fragrance stands
upon your stronger resistance.
Stars stand in images above.
Give me your mouth to soften, love;
ah, your hair is all in idleness.

See, I want to surround you with yourself
and the faded expectation lift
from the edges of your eyebrows;
I want, as with inner eyelids sheer,
to close for you all places which appear
by my tender caresses now.


by William Blake

Song: Memory hither come

 Memory, hither come, 
And tune your merry notes;
And, while upon the wind
Your music floats,

I'll pore upon the stream
Where sighing lovers dream,
And fish for fancies as they pass
Within the watery glass.

I'll drink of the clear stream,
And hear the linnet's song;
And there I'll lie and dream
The day along:

And, when night comes, I'll go
To places fit for woe,
Walking along the darken'd valley
With silent Melancholy.


by Joyce Kilmer

Vision

 (For Aline)

Homer, they tell us, was blind and could not see the beautiful 
faces
Looking up into his own and reflecting the joy of his dream,
Yet did he seem
Gifted with eyes that could follow the gods to their holiest places.
I have no vision of gods, not of Eros with love-arrows laden,
Jupiter thundering death or of Juno his white-breasted queen,
Yet have I seen
All of the joy of the world in the innocent heart of a maiden.


by Ezra Pound

Francesca

 You came in out of the night
And there were flowers in your hand,
Now you will come out of a confusion of people,
Out of a turmoil of speech about you.

I who have seen you amid the primal things
Was angry when they spoke your name
IN ordinary places.
I would that the cool waves might flow over my mind,
And that the world should dry as a dead leaf,
Or as a dandelion see-pod and be swept away,
So that I might find you again,
Alone.


by Rainer Maria Rilke

The Sonnets To Orpheus: Book 2: I

 Breathing: you invisible poem! Complete
interchange of our own
essence with world-space. You counterweight
in which I rythmically happen.

Single wave-motion whose
gradual sea I am:
you, most inclusive of all our possible seas-
space has grown warm.

How many regions in space have already been
inside me. There are winds that seem like
my wandering son.

Do you recognize me, air, full of places I once absorbed?
You who were the smooth bark,
roundness, and leaf of my words.


by Carl Sandburg

Just Before April Came

 THE SNOW piles in dark places are gone.
Pools by the railroad tracks shine clear.
The gravel of all shallow places shines.
A white pigeon reels and somersaults.

Frogs plutter and squdge—and frogs beat the air with a recurring thin steel sliver of melody.
Crows go in fives and tens; they march their black feathers past a blue pool; they celebrate an old festival.
A spider is trying his webs, a pink bug sits on my hand washing his forelegs.
I might ask: Who are these people?


by James Henry Leigh Hunt

May and the Poets

 There is May in books forever; 
May will part from Spenser never; 
May's in Milton, May's in Prior, 
May's in Chaucer, Thomson, Dyer; 
May's in all the Italian books:-- 
She has old and modern nooks, 
Where she sleeps with nymphs and elves, 
In happy places they call shelves, 
And will rise and dress your rooms 
With a drapery thick with blooms. 
Come, ye rains, then if ye will, 
May's at home, and with me still; 
But come rather, thou, good weather, 
And find us in the fields together.


by Carl Sandburg

Pennsylvania

 I HAVE been in Pennsylvania,
In the Monongahela and the Hocking Valleys.

In the blue Susquehanna
On a Saturday morning
I saw the mounted constabulary go by,
I saw boys playing marbles.
Spring and the hills laughed.

And in places
Along the Appalachian chain,
I saw steel arms handling coal and iron,
And I saw the white-cauliflower faces
Of miners’ wives waiting for the men to come home from the day’s work.

I made color studies in crimson and violet
Over the dust and domes of culm at sunset.