Submit Your Poems
Get Your Premium Membership

Famous Short Light Poems. Short Light Poetry by Famous Poets

Famous Short Light Poems. Short Light Poetry by Famous Poets. A collection of the all-time best Light short poems

See also: Best Famous Short Poems | Short Member Poems | Best Short Member Poems | Top 100 Famous Short Poems

12
 
by Emily Dickinson

Of their peculiar light

 Of their peculiar light
I keep one ray
To clarify the Sight
To seek them by --


by Emily Dickinson

Morning is due to all --

 Morning is due to all --
To some -- the Night --
To an imperial few --
The Auroral light.


by Carl Sandburg

Window

 Night from a railroad car window
Is a great, dark, soft thing
Broken across with slashes of light.


by Emily Dickinson

Had I not seen the Sun

 Had I not seen the Sun
I could have borne the shade
But Light a newer Wilderness
My Wilderness has made --


by Emily Dickinson

In thy long Paradise of Light

 In thy long Paradise of Light
No moment will there be
When I shall long for Earthly Play
And mortal Company --


by Emily Dickinson

Pass to they Rendezvous of Light

 Pass to they Rendezvous of Light,
Pangless except for us --
Who slowly for the Mystery
Which thou hast leaped across!


by Edna St Vincent Millay

First Fig

 My candle burns at both ends;
It will not last the night;
But ah, my foes, and oh, my friends ­
It gives a lovely light!


by Edna St Vincent Millay

First Fig

 My candle burns at both ends;
It will not last the night;
But ah, my foes, and oh, my friends—
It gives a lovely light.


by Emily Dickinson

Morning -- is the place for Dew

 Morning -- is the place for Dew --
Corn -- is made at Noon --
After dinner light -- for flowers --
Dukes -- for Setting Sun!


by Roger McGough

Mrs Moon

 Mrs Moon
sitting up in the sky
little old lady
rock-a-bye
with a ball of fading light
and silvery needles
knitting the night


by Emily Dickinson

Before He comes we weigh the Time!

 Before He comes we weigh the Time!
'Tis Heavy and 'tis Light.
When He depart, an Emptiness Is the prevailing Freight.


by Emily Dickinson

Let my first Knowing be of thee

 Let my first Knowing be of thee
With morning's warming Light --
And my first Fearing, lest Unknowns
Engulf thee in the night --


by Friedrich von Schiller

The Genius With The Inverted Torch

 Lovely he looks, 'tis true, with the light of his torch now extinguished;
But remember that death is not aesthetic, my friends!


by Emily Dickinson

Unworthy of her Breast

 Unworthy of her Breast
Though by that scathing test
What Soul survive?
By her exacting light
How counterfeit the white
We chiefly have!


by Robert Burns

455. Epitaph on a noted coxcomb

 LIGHT lay the earth on Billy’s breast,
 His chicken heart so tender;
But build a castle on his head,
 His scull will prop it under.


by Emily Dickinson

Image of Light Adieu --

 Image of Light, Adieu --
Thanks for the interview --
So long -- so short --
Preceptor of the whole --
Coeval Cardinal --
Impart -- Depart --


by Edward Lear

L was a light

L

was a light
Which burned all the night,
And lighted the gloom
Of a very dark room.

l

Useful nice light!


by Edward Lear

Z was some zinc

Z

was some zinc,
So shiny and bright,
Which caused you to wink
In the sun's merry light.

z

Beautiful zinc!


by Dejan Stojanovic

Before and After

Before the first before
And after the last after
There is night waiting; 

Almost nonexistent
Yet so constant, 
Night in the heart of light.


by Edward Lear

L was a fine new Lamp

L

was a fine new Lamp;
But when the wick was lit, Papa he said, "This Light ain't good!
I cannot read a bit!"


by Emily Dickinson

By a departing light

 By a departing light
We see acuter, quite,
Than by a wick that stays.
There's something in the flight That clarifies the sight And decks the rays.


by Emily Dickinson

Guest am I to have

 Guest am I to have
Light my northern room
Why to cordiality so averse to come
Other friends adjourn
Other bonds decay
Why avoid so narrowly
My fidelity --


by Spike Milligan

Bump

 Things that go 'bump' in the night
Should not really give one a fright.
It's the hole in each ear That lets in the fear, That, and the absence of light!


by Stephen Crane

I was in the darkness

 I was in the darkness;
I could not see my words
Nor the wishes of my heart.
Then suddenly there was a great light -- "Let me into the darkness again.
"


by Edward Lear

There was an old man in a barge

There was an old man in a barge,
Whose nose was exceedingly large;
But in fishing by night, it supported a light,
Which helped that old man in a barge.


12