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Famous Short June Poems. Short June Poetry by Famous Poets

Famous Short June Poems. Short June Poetry by Famous Poets. A collection of the all-time best June short poems

See also: Best Famous Short Poems | Short Member Poems | Best Short Member Poems | Top 100 Famous Short Poems

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by Gwendolyn Brooks

We Real Cool

 We real cool.
We Left School.
We Lurk late.
We Strike straight.
We Sing sin.
We Thin gin.
We Jazz June.
We Die soon.


by Edward Lear

There was an Old Person of Tring

There was an Old Person of Tring,
Who embellished his nose with a ring;
He gazed at the moon every evening in June,
That ecstatic Old Person of Tring.


by Mother Goose

Bees


A swarm of bees in May
Is worth a load of hay;
A swarm of bees in June
Is worth a silver spoon;
A swarm of bees in July
Is not worth a fly.


by Mother Goose

Thirty Days Hath September


Thirty days hath September,
April, June, and November;
February has twenty-eight alone,
All the rest have thirty-one,
Excepting leap-year, that's the time
When February's days are twenty-nine.


by Emily Dickinson

To see her is a Picture --

 To see her is a Picture --
To hear her is a Tune --
To know her an Intemperance
As innocent as June --
To know her not -- Affliction --
To own her for a Friend
A warmth as near as if the Sun
Were shining in your Hand.


by Emily Dickinson

There is a Zone whose even Years

 There is a Zone whose even Years
No Solstice interrupt --
Whose Sun constructs perpetual Noon
Whose perfect Seasons wait --

Whose Summer set in Summer, till
The Centuries of June
And Centuries of August cease
And Consciousness -- is Noon.


by Fenny Sterenborg

Summer Colours

 Long curls
lightest blond
like silver and gold
in the saffron sun

Summer dresses
cool white
show lots of skin
golden brown

Painted toenails
fierce red
in summer shoes
walk by

and catch eyes
green and blue
behind black shades
against the gleam


June 20, 2006
©2006 Fenny


by Emily Dickinson

They dropped like Flakes

 They dropped like Flakes --
They dropped like Stars --
Like Petals from a Rose --
When suddenly across the June
A wind with fingers -- goes --

They perished in the Seamless Grass --
No eye could find the place --
But God can summon every face
Of his Repealless -- List.


by Robert Louis Stevenson

Lo! In Thine Honest Eyes I Read

 LO! in thine honest eyes I read
The auspicious beacon that shall lead,
After long sailing in deep seas,
To quiet havens in June ease.
Thy voice sings like an inland bird First by the seaworn sailor heard; And like road sheltered from life's sea Thine honest heart is unto me.


by Robert Herrick

THE SUCCESSION OF THE FOUR SWEET MONTHS

 First, April, she with mellow showers
Opens the way for early flowers;
Then after her comes smiling May,
In a more rich and sweet array;
Next enters June, and brings us more
Gems than those two that went before;
Then, lastly, July comes, and she
More wealth brings in than all those three.


by Philip Larkin

Cut Grass

 Cut grass lies frail:
Brief is the breath
Mown stalks exhale.
Long, long the death It dies in the white hours Of young-leafed June With chestnut flowers, With hedges snowlike strewn, White lilac bowed, Lost lanes of Queen Anne's lace, And that high-builded cloud Moving at summer's pace.


by Emily Dickinson

Summer has two Beginnings --

 Summer has two Beginnings --
Beginning once in June --
Beginning in October
Affectingly again --

Without, perhaps, the Riot
But graphicker for Grace --
As finer is a going
Than a remaining Face --

Departing then -- forever --
Forever -- until May --
Forever is deciduous
Except to those who die --


by Louise Gluck

Lullaby

 Softly lie down
and close your eyes so blue
worry no more
for tonight I'll watch over you

Gently rest your head
against my soothing chest
for here in my arms
you've found a safe place to rest

Sleep sweet child
in peaceful undisturbed dreams
and don't awake
until the morning beams


June 25, 2006
©2006 Fenny


by Bertolt Brecht

The Solution

 After the uprising of the 17th June
The Secretary of the Writers Union
Had leaflets distributed in the Stalinallee
Stating that the people
Had forfeited the confidence of the government
And could win it back only
By redoubled efforts.
Would it not be easier In that case for the government To dissolve the people And elect another?


by Arthur Symons

In Fountain Court

 The fountain murmuring of sleep, 
A drowsy tune; 
The flickering green of leaves that keep 
The light of June; 
Peace, through a slumbering afternoon, 
The peace of June.
A waiting ghost, in the blue sky, The white curved moon; June, hushed and breathless, waits, and I Wait too, with June; Come, through the lingering afternoon, Soon, love, come soon.


by Edgar Lee Masters

Francis Turner

 I could not run or play
In boyhood.
In manhood I could only sip the cup, Not drink -- For scarlet-fever left my heart diseased.
Yet I lie here Soothed by a secret none but Mary knows: There is a garden of acacia, Catalpa trees, and arbors sweet with vines -- There on that afternoon in June By Mary's side -- Kissing her with my soul upon my lips It suddenly took flight.


by Amy Levy

June

 Last June I saw your face three times;
Three times I touched your hand;
Now, as before, May month is o'er,
And June is in the land.
O many Junes shall come and go, Flow'r-footed o'er the mead; O many Junes for me, to whom Is length of days decreed.
There shall be sunlight, scent of rose; Warm mist of summer rain; Only this change--I shall not look Upon your face again.


by Carl Sandburg

Young Bullfrogs

 JIMMY WIMBLETON listened a first week in June.
Ditches along prairie roads of Northern Illinois Filled the arch of night with young bullfrog songs.
Infinite mathematical metronomic croaks rose and spoke, Rose and sang, rose in a choir of puzzles.
They made his head ache with riddles of music.
They rested his head with beaten cadence.
Jimmy Wimbledon listened.


by Vachel Lindsay

Caught in a Net

 Upon her breast her hands and hair 
Were tangled all together.
The moon of June forbade me not — The golden night time weather In balmy sighs commanded me To kiss them like a feather.
Her looming hair, her burning hands, Were tangled black and white.
My face I buried there.
I pray — So far from her to-night — For grace, to dream I kiss her soul Amid the black and white.


by Emily Dickinson

The nearest Dream recedes -- unrealized

 The nearest Dream recedes -- unrealized --
The Heaven we chase,
Like the June Bee -- before the School Boy,
Invites the Race --
Stoops -- to an easy Clover --
Dips -- evades -- teases -- deploys --
Then -- to the Royal Clouds
Lifts his light Pinnace --
Heedless of the Boy --
Staring -- bewildered -- at the mocking sky --
Homesick for steadfast Honey --
Ah, the Bee flies not
That brews that rare variety!


by Elizabeth Barrett Browning

The Best Thing In The World

 What's the best thing in the world? 
June-rose, by May-dew impearled; 
Sweet south-wind, that means no rain; 
Truth, not cruel to a friend; 
Pleasure, not in haste to end; 
Beauty, not self-decked and curled 
Till its pride is over-plain; 
Light, that never makes you wink; 
Memory, that gives no pain; 
Love, when, so, you're loved again.
What's the best thing in the world? —Something out of it, I think.


by Robert Browning

Youll love me yet!—and I can tarry

 You'll love me yet!—and I can tarry
Your love's protracted growing:
June reared that bunch of flowers you carry
From seeds of April's sowing.
I plant a heartful now: some seed At least is sure to strike, And yield—what you'll not pluck indeed, Not love, but, may be, like! You'll look at least on love's remains, A grave's one violet: Your look?—that pays a thousand pains.
What's death?—You'll love me yet!


by Connie Wanek

Daisies

 In the democracy of daisies
every blossom has one vote.
The question on the ballot is Does he love me? If the answer's wrong I try another, a little sorry about the petals piling up around my shoes.
Bees are loose in the fields where daisies wait and hope, dreaming of the kiss of a proboscis.
We can't possibly understand what makes us such fools.
I blame the June heat and everything about him.


by Allen Ginsberg

Fourth Floor Dawn Up All Night Writing Letters

 Pigeons shake their wings on the copper church roof
out my window across the street, a bird perched on the cross
surveys the city's blue-grey clouds.
Larry Rivers 'll come at 10 AM and take my picture.
I'm taking your picture, pigeons.
I'm writing you down, Dawn.
I'm immortalizing your exhaust, Avenue A bus.
O Thought! Now you'll have to think the same thing forever! New York, June 7, 1980, 6:48 A.
M.


by Delmore Schwartz

Poem (In the morning when it was raining)

 In the morning, when it was raining,
Then the birds were hectic and loudy;
Through all the reign is fall's entertaining;
Their singing was erratic and full of disorder:
They did not remember the summer blue
Or the orange of June.
They did not think at all Of the great red and bursting ball Of the kingly sun's terror and tempest, blazing, Once the slanting rain threw over all The colorless curtains of the ceaseless spontaneous fall.


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