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Famous Short Journey Poems

Famous Short Journey Poems. Short Journey Poetry by Famous Poets. A collection of the all-time best Journey short poems

Other Short Poem Pages

More great short poems below.

Journey | Short Famous Poems and Poets

by Ogura Hyakunin Isshu

Ono no Komachi

Color of the flower
Has already passed away
While on trivial things
Vainly I have set my gaze,
In my journey through the world.

by Emily Dickinson

Elijahs Wagon knew no thill

 Elijah's Wagon knew no thill
Was innocent of Wheel
Elijah's horses as unique
As was his vehicle --

Elijah's journey to portray
Expire with him the skill
Who justified Elijah
In feats inscrutable --

by Emily Dickinson

Cosmopolities without a plea

 Cosmopolities without a plea
Alight in every Land
The compliments of Paradise
From those within my Hand

Their dappled Journey to themselves
A compensation fair
Knock and it shall be opened
Is their Theology

by Omar Khayyam

Thy pity being promised me, I have no fear of sin.

Thy pity being promised me, I have no fear of sin.
With the provision that Thou possessest, I have no disquiet
about the journey. Thy benevolence renders my
visage white and of the black book I have no fear.

by Emily Dickinson

I sing to use the Waiting

 I sing to use the Waiting
My Bonnet but to tie
And shut the Door unto my House
No more to do have I

Till His best step approaching
We journey to the Day
And tell each other how We sung
To Keep the Dark away.

by Omar Khayyam

O idol, while you are on your journey through this

O idol, while you are on your journey through this
world, draw from the fountain-head into the pitcher, draw
this salutary wine and, ere the potter makes another
pitcher of my dust and thine, fill out a cup, drink it
and pass me one.

by Emily Dickinson

Dropped into the Ether Acre --

 Dropped into the Ether Acre --
Wearing the Sod Gown --
Bonnet of Everlasting Laces --
Brooch -- frozen on --

Horses of Blonde -- and Coach of Silver --
Baggage a strapped Pearl --
Journey of Down -- and Whip of Diamond --
Riding to meet the Earl --

by William Butler Yeats

The Pity Of Love

 A pity beyond all telling
Is hid in the heart of love:
The folk who are buying and selling,
The clouds on their journey above,
The cold wet winds ever blowing,
And the shadowy hazel grove
Where mouse-grey waters are flowing,
Threaten the head that I love.

by Wendell Berry

The Real Work

 It may be that when we no longer know what to do
we have come our real work,

and that when we no longer know which way to go
we have come to our real journey.
The mind that is not baffled is not employed.
The impeded stream is the one that sings.

by Henry Van Dyke

The Gentle Traveller

 Through many a land your journey ran,
And showed the best the world can boast:
Now tell me, traveller, if you can,
The place that pleased you most.
" She laid her hands upon my breast, And murmured gently in my ear, "The place I loved and liked the best Was in your arms, my dear!"

by William Blake

Ah! Sun-Flower

 Ah Sun-flower! weary of time.
Who countest the steps of the Sun; Seeking after that sweet golden clime Where the travellers journey is done.
Where the Youth pined away with desire, And the pale Virgin shrouded in snow: Arise from their graves and aspire.
Where my Sun-flower wishes to go.

by Emily Dickinson

Nobody knows this little Rose

 Nobody knows this little Rose --
It might a pilgrim be
Did I not take it from the ways
And lift it up to thee.
Only a Bee will miss it -- Only a Butterfly, Hastening from far journey -- On its breast to lie -- Only a Bird will wonder -- Only a Breeze will sigh -- Ah Little Rose -- how easy For such as thee to die!

by Emily Dickinson

Not probable -- The barest Chance

 Not probable -- The barest Chance --
A smile too few -- a word too much
And far from Heaven as the Rest --
The Soul so close on Paradise --

What if the Bird from journey far --
Confused by Sweets -- as Mortals -- are --
Forget the secret of His wing
And perish -- but a Bough between --
Oh, Groping feet --
Oh Phantom Queen!

by Emily Dickinson

Could live -- did live

 Could live -- did live --
Could die -- did die --
Could smile upon the whole
Through faith in one he met not,
To introduce his soul.
Could go from scene familiar To an untraversed spot -- Could contemplate the journey With unpuzzled heart -- Such trust had one among us, Among us not today -- We who saw the launching Never sailed the Bay!

by George William Russell

The Mid-World

 THIS is the red, red region
Your heart must journey through:
Your pains will here be legion
And joy be death for you.
Rejoice to-day: to-morrow A turning tide shall flow Through infinite tones of sorrow To reach an equal woe.
You pass by love unheeding To gain the goal you long— But my heart, my heart is bleeding: I cannot sing this song.

by Emily Dickinson

Our journey had advanced --

 Our journey had advanced --
Our feet were almost come
To that odd Fork in Being's Road --
Eternity -- by Term --

Our pace took sudden awe --
Our feet -- reluctant -- led --
Before -- were Cities -- but Between --
The Forest of the Dead --

Retreat -- was out of Hope --
Behind -- a Sealed Route --
Eternity's White Flag -- Before --
And God -- at every Gate --

by Ingeborg Bachmann


 Now the journey is ending,
the wind is losing heart.
Into your hands it's falling, a rickety house of cards.
The cards are backed with pictures displaying all the world.
You've stacked up all the images and shuffled them with words.
And how profound the playing that once again begins! Stay, the card you're drawing is the only world you'll win.

by Hafez

Wend I, wander I, past all worlds that be

Wend I, wander I, past all worlds that be;
Ever have I wander’d or e’er the earth was made;
Urg’d like the álien áir o’er land & sea,
Sleepless as sunlight, joyless as its shade.

Not on your earth travel I; sáy not to mé
‘Cease awhile thy wandering, Ó tir’d day!’
Say not, ‘O pilgrim, rest thee; comfort thee’:
Not hére is my journey’s end, Indus nor Cathay.

by Emily Dickinson

I cannot buy it -- tis not sold --

 I cannot buy it -- 'tis not sold --
There is no other in the World --
Mine was the only one

I was so happy I forgot
To shut the Door And it went out
And I am all alone --

If I could find it Anywhere
I would not mind the journey there
Though it took all my store

But just to look it in the Eye --
"Did'st thou?" "Thou did'st not mean," to say,
Then, turn my Face away.

by Walter de la Mare


 Clouded with snow 
The cold winds blow, 
And shrill on leafless bough 
The robin with its burning breast 
Alone sings now.
The rayless sun, Day's journey done, Sheds its last ebbing light On fields in leagues of beauty spread Unearthly white.
Thick draws the dark, And spark by spark, The frost-fires kindle, and soon Over that sea of frozen foam Floats the white moon.

by Dylan Thomas

Twenty-Four Years

 Twenty-four years remind the tears of my eyes.
(Bury the dead for fear that they walk to the grave in labour.
) In the groin of the natural doorway I crouched like a tailor Sewing a shroud for a journey By the light of the meat-eating sun.
Dressed to die, the sensual strut begun, With my red veins full of money, In the final direction of the elementary town I advance as long as forever is.

by Margaret Atwood


 What should we have taken
with us? We never could decide
on that; or what to wear,
or at what time of
year we should make the journey

So here we are in thin
raincoats and rubber boots

On the disastrous ice, the wind rising

Nothing in our pockets

But a pencil stub, two oranges
Four Toronto streetcar tickets

and an elastic band holding a bundle
of small white filing cards
printed with important facts.

by Emily Dickinson

One Crucifixion is recorded -- only --

 One Crucifixion is recorded -- only --
How many be
Is not affirmed of Mathematics --
Or History --

One Calvary -- exhibited to Stranger --
As many be
As persons -- or Peninsulas --
Gethsemane --

Is but a Province -- in the Being's Centre --
Judea --
For Journey -- or Crusade's Achieving --
Too near --

Our Lord -- indeed -- made Compound Witness --
And yet --
There's newer -- nearer Crucifixion
Than That --

by Walt Whitman

To Rich Givers.

 WHAT you give me, I cheerfully accept, 
A little sustenance, a hut and garden, a little money—these, as I rendezvous with my
A traveler’s lodging and breakfast as I journey through The States—Why should I
 ashamed to own such gifts? Why to advertise for them? 
For I myself am not one who bestows nothing upon man and woman; 
For I bestow upon any man or woman the entrance to all the gifts of the universe.

by Wang Wei


 I have got my leave.
Bid me farewell, my brothers! I bow to you all and take my departure.
Here I give back the keys of my door ---and I give up all claims to my house.
I only ask for last kind words from you.
We were neighbors for long, but I received more than I could give.
Now the day has dawned and the lamp that lit my dark corner is out.
A summons has come and I am ready for my journey.