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Famous Short Heart Poems. Short Heart Poetry by Famous Poets

Famous Short Heart Poems. Short Heart Poetry by Famous Poets. A collection of the all-time best Heart short poems

See also: Best Famous Short Poems | Short Member Poems | Best Short Member Poems | Top 100 Famous Short Poems

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by Robert Herrick

THE HEART

 In prayer the lips ne'er act the winning part
Without the sweet concurrence of the heart.


by Emily Dickinson

Sometimes with the Heart

 Sometimes with the Heart
Seldom with the Soul
Scarcer once with the Might
Few -- love at all.


by Emily Dickinson

Unto a broken heart

 Unto a broken heart
No other one may go
Without the high prerogative
Itself hath suffered too.


by Emily Dickinson

My Heart upon a little Plate

 My Heart upon a little Plate
Her Palate to delight
A Berry or a Bun, would be,
Might it an Apricot!


by Emily Dickinson

Not Sickness stains the Brave

 Not Sickness stains the Brave,
Nor any Dart,
Nor Doubt of Scene to come,
But an adjourning Heart --


by Emily Dickinson

Confirming All who analyze

 Confirming All who analyze
In the Opinion fair
That Eloquence is when the Heart
Has not a Voice to spare --


by Emily Dickinson

Parting with Thee reluctantly

 Parting with Thee reluctantly,
That we have never met,
A Heart sometimes a Foreigner,
Remembers it forgot --


by Emily Dickinson

God made no act without a cause

 God made no act without a cause,
Nor heart without an aim,
Our inference is premature,
Our premises to blame.


by David Herbert Lawrence

Nothing To Save

 There is nothing to save, now all is lost,
but a tiny core of stillness in the heart
like the eye of a violet.


by Herman Melville

Gold in the Mountain

 Gold in the mountain,
And gold in the glen,
And greed in the heart,
Heaven having no part,
And unsatisfied men.


by Emily Dickinson

Arrows enamored of his Heart --

 Arrows enamored of his Heart --
Forgot to rankle there
And Venoms he mistook for Balms
disdained to rankle there --


by Emily Dickinson

To break so vast a Heart

 To break so vast a Heart
Required a Blow as vast --
No Zephyr felled this Cedar straight --
'Twas undeserved Blast --


by William Morris

Spring

 Spring am I, too soft of heart
Much to speak ere I depart:
Ask the Summer-tide to prove
The abundance of my love.


by Emily Dickinson

Where Roses would not dare to go

 Where Roses would not dare to go,
What Heart would risk the way --
And so I send my Crimson Scouts
To sound the Enemy --


by Dorothy Parker

Faute De Mieux

 Travel, trouble, music, art,
A kiss, a frock, a rhyme-
I never said they feed my heart,
But still they pass my time.


by Walter Savage Landor

One Lovely Name

 One lovely name adorns my song, 
And, dwelling in the heart, 
Forever falters at the tongue, 
And trembles to depart.


by Emily Dickinson

His Heart was darker than the starless night

 His Heart was darker than the starless night
For that there is a morn
But in this black Receptacle
Can be no Bode of Dawn


by Emily Dickinson

By homely gift and hindered Words

 By homely gift and hindered Words
The human heart is told
Of Nothing --
"Nothing" is the force
That renovates the World --


by Dorothy Parker

Experience

 Some men break your heart in two,
Some men fawn and flatter,
Some men never look at you;
And that cleans up the matter.


by Emily Dickinson

My Eye is fuller than my vase

 My Eye is fuller than my vase --
Her Cargo -- is of Dew --
And still -- my Heart -- my Eye outweighs --
East India -- for you!


by Friedrich von Schiller

The Key

 Wouldst thou know thyself, observe the actions of others.
Wouldst thou other men know, look thou within thine own heart.


by Friedrich von Schiller

Inside And Outside

 God alone sees the heart and therefore, since he alone sees it,
Be it our care that we, too, something that's worthy may see.


by William Morris

Autumn

 Laden Autumn here I stand
Worn of heart, and weak of hand:
Nought but rest seems good to me,
Speak the word that sets me free.


by Emily Dickinson

Sweet Pirate of the heart

 Sweet Pirate of the heart,
Not Pirate of the Sea,
What wrecketh thee?
Some spice's Mutiny --
Some Attar's perfidy?
Confide in me.


by Emily Dickinson

An antiquated Grace

 An antiquated Grace
Becomes that cherished Face
As well as prime
Enjoining us to part
We and our pouting Heart
Good friends with time


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