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Famous Short Happiness Poems. Short Happiness Poetry by Famous Poets

Famous Short Happiness Poems. Short Happiness Poetry by Famous Poets. A collection of the all-time best Happiness short poems

See also: Best Famous Short Poems | Short Member Poems | Best Short Member Poems | Top 100 Famous Short Poems

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by Paul Celan

Landscape

 tall poplars -- human beings of this earth!
black pounds of happiness -- you mirror them to death!

I saw you, sister, stand in that effulgence.


by William Butler Yeats

A Man Young And Old: III. The Mermaid

 A mermaid found a swimming lad,
Picked him for her own,
Pressed her body to his body,
Laughed; and plunging down
Forgot in cruel happiness
That even lovers drown.


by Lawrence Ferlinghetti

Recipe For Happiness Khaborovsk Or Anyplace

 One grand boulevard with trees
with one grand cafe in sun
with strong black coffee in very small cups.
One not necessarily very beautiful man or woman who loves you.
One fine day.


by Stevie Smith

Happiness

 Happiness is silent, or speaks equivocally for friends,
Grief is explicit and her song never ends,
Happiness is like England, and will not state a case,
Grief, like Guilt, rushes in and talks apace.


by Dimitris P Kraniotis

Ashes

 The fireplace
was eager
to put a fullstop,
in the sentence
where the road
of my dreams
stuck
upon the word of happiness
with sparkles
of wet logs
I collected
from the inside of me
that I dared
to turn to ashes.


by Emily Dickinson

Such is the Force of Happiness --

 Such is the Force of Happiness --
The Least -- can lift a Ton
Assisted by its stimulus --

Who Misery -- sustain --
No Sinew can afford --
The Cargo of Themselves --
Too infinite for Consciousness'
Slow capabilities.


by Emily Dickinson

Of God we ask one favor

 Of God we ask one favor,
That we may be forgiven --
For what, he is presumed to know --
The Crime, from us, is hidden --
Immured the whole of Life
Within a magic Prison
We reprimand the Happiness
That too competes with Heaven.


by Robert Burns

164. Song—A Bottle and Friend

 HERE’S a bottle and an honest friend!
 What wad ye wish for mair, man?
Wha kens, before his life may end,
 What his share may be o’ care, man?


Then catch the moments as they fly,
 And use them as ye ought, man:
Believe me, happiness is shy,
 And comes not aye when sought, man.


by Louise Gluck

Confession

 To say I'm without fear--
It wouldn't be true.
I'm afraid of sickness, humiliation.
Like anyone, I have my dreams.
But I've learned to hide them, To protect myself From fulfillment: all happiness Attracts the Fates' anger.
They are sisters, savages-- In the end they have No emotion but envy.


by Paul Eluard

Other Children

 "Little child of my five senses 
and of my tenderness.
" Let us cradle our loves, We will have good children.
Well cared for, We will fear nothing on earth, Happiness, good fortune, prudence, Our loves And this leap from age to age, From the order of a child to that of an old man, Will not diminish us.
(Confidence).


by Emily Dickinson

I thought the Train would never come --

 I thought the Train would never come --
How slow the whistle sang --
I don't believe a peevish Bird
So whimpered for the Spring --
I taught my Heart a hundred times
Precisely what to say --
Provoking Lover, when you came
Its Treatise flew away
To hide my strategy too late
To wiser be too soon --
For miseries so halcyon
The happiness atone --


by Mark Strand

So You Say

 It is all in the mind, you say, and has
nothing to do with happiness.
The coming of cold, the coming of heat, the mind has all the time in the world.
You take my arm and say something will happen, something unusual for which we were always prepared, like the sun arriving after a day in Asia, like the moon departing after a night with us.


by Vasko Popa

The Tenants Of The Little Box

 Throw into the little box
A stone
You'll take out a bird

Throw in your shadow
You'll take out the shirt of happiness

Throw in your father's root
You'll take out the axle of the universe

The little box works for you

Throw into the little box
A mouse
You'll take out a quaking hill

Throw in your head
You'll take out two

The little box works for you


by Ellis Parker Butler

The Rich Boy’s Christmas

 And now behold this sulking boy,
His costly presents bring no joy;
Harsh tears of anger fill his eye
Tho’ he has all that wealth can buy.
What profits it that he employs His many gifts to make a noise? His playroom is so placed that he Can cause his folks no agony.
MORAL: Mere worldly wealth does not possess The power of giving happiness.


by Alexander Pushkin

The Dream

 Not long ago, in a charming dream,
I saw myself -- a king with crown's treasure;
I was in love with you, it seemed,
And heart was beating with a pleasure.
I sang my passion's song by your enchanting knees.
Why, dreams, you didn't prolong my happiness forever? But gods deprived me not of whole their favor: I only lost the kingdom of my dreams.


by Denise Levertov

The Breathing

 An absolute
patience.
Trees stand up to their knees in fog.
The fog slowly flows uphill.
White cobwebs, the grass leaning where deer have looked for apples.
The woods from brook to where the top of the hill looks over the fog, send up not one bird.
So absolute, it is no other than happiness itself, a breathing too quiet to hear.


by Robert Herrick

KISSING USURY

 Biancha, let
Me pay the debt
I owe thee for a kiss
Thou lend'st to me;
And I to thee
Will render ten for this.
If thou wilt say, Ten will not pay For that so rich a one; I'll clear the sum, If it will come Unto a million.
He must of right, To th' utmost mite, Make payment for his pleasure, (By this I guess) Of happiness Who has a little measure.


by Margaret Widdemer

If you should tire of loving me

 If you should tire of loving me 
 Some one of our far days, 
Oh, never start to hide your heart 
 Or cover thought with praise.
For every word you would not say Be sure my heart has heard, So go from me all silently Without a kiss or word; For God must give you happiness, And Oh, it may befall In listening long to Heaven-song I may not care at all!


by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

FOR EVER.

 THE happiness that man, whilst prison'd here,

Is wont with heavenly rapture to compare,--
The harmony of Truth, from wavering clear,--

Of Friendship that is free from doubting care,--
The light which in stray thoughts alone can cheer

The wise,--the bard alone in visions fair,--
In my best hours I found in her all this,
And made mine own, to mine exceeding bliss.
1820.
*


by James Whitcomb Riley

The Old Times Were the Best

 Friends, my heart is half aweary
Of its happiness to-night:
Though your songs are gay and cheery,
And your spirits feather-light,
There's a ghostly music haunting
Still the heart of every guest
And a voiceless chorus chanting
That the Old Times were the best.
CHORUS All about is bright and pleasant With the sound of song and jest, Yet a feeling's ever present That the Old Times were the best.


by James Joyce

This Heart that Flutters Near My Heart

 This heart that flutters near my heart 
My hope and all my riches is, 
Unhappy when we draw apart 
And happy between kiss and kiss: 
My hope and all my riches -- - yes! -- - 
And all my happiness.
For there, as in some mossy nest The wrens will divers treasures keep, I laid those treasures I possessed Ere that mine eyes had learned to weep.
Shall we not be as wise as they Though love live but a day?


by Osip Mandelstam

This

 This is what I most want
unpursued, alone
to reach beyond the light
that I am furthest from.
And for you to shine there- no other happiness- and learn, from starlight, what its fire might suggest.
A star burns as a star, light becomes light, because our murmuring strengthens us, and warms the night.
And I want to say to you my little one, whispering, I can only lift you towards the light by means of this babbling.


by Carl Sandburg

Happiness

 I ASKED the professors who teach the meaning of life to tell
me what is happiness.
And I went to famous executives who boss the work of thousands of men.
They all shook their heads and gave me a smile as though I was trying to fool with them And then one Sunday afternoon I wandered out along the Desplaines river And I saw a crowd of Hungarians under the trees with their women and children and a keg of beer and an accordion.


by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

THE CONVERT.

 As at sunset I was straying

Silently the wood along,
Damon on his flute was playing,

And the rocks gave back the song,
So la, Ia! &c.
Softly tow'rds him then he drew me; Sweet each kiss he gave me then! And I said, "Play once more to me!" And he kindly play'd again, So la, la! &c.
All my peace for aye has fleeted, All my happiness has flown; Yet my ears are ever greeted With that olden, blissful tone, So la, la! &c.
1791.


by Nikki Giovanni

You Came, Too

You Came, Too


I came to the crowd seeking friends
I came to the crowd seeking love
I came to the crowd for understanding


I found you


I came to the crowd to weep
I came to the crowd to laugh


You dried my tears
You shared my happiness


I went from the crowd seeking you
I went from the crowd seeking me
I went from the crowd forever


You came, too


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